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A control system upgrade of the spear synchrotron and injector

Description: The SPEAR electron synchrotron is an old and venerable facility with a history of great physics. When this storage ring was converted to serve as a full-time synchrotron light source, it was evident that the facility was due for an overhaul of its control system. Outdated hardware interfaces, custom operator interfaces, and the control computer itself were replaced with off-the-shelf distributed intelligent controllers and networked X-workstations. However, almost all applications and control functions were retained by simply rewriting the layer of software closest to each new device. The success of this upgrade prompted us to do a similar upgrade of our Injector system. Although the Injector was already running an X-windows based control system, it was non-networked and Q-bus based. By using the same Ethernet based controllers that were used at SPEAR, we were able to integrate the two systems into one that resembles the ``standard model`` for control systems, and at the same time preserve the applications software that has been developed over the years on both systems.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Garrett, R.; Howry, S.; Wermelskirchen, C. & Yang, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quadrupole shunt experiments at SPEAR

Description: As part of a program to align and stabilize the SPEAR storage ring, a switchable shunt resistor was installed on each quadrupole to bypass a small percentage of the magnet current. The impact of a quadrupole shunt is to move the electron beam orbit in proportion to the off-axis beam position at the quadrupole, and to shift the betatron tune. Initially, quadrupole shunts in SPEAR were used to position the electron beam in the center of the quadrupoles. This provided readback offsets for nearby beam position monitors, and helped to steer the photon beams with low-amplitude corrector currents. The shunt-induced tune shift measurements were then processed in MAD to derive a lattice model.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Corbett, W.J.; Hettel, R.O. & Nuhn, H.-D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

Description: 1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.
Date: December 31, 1987
Creator: Cantwell, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

Description: The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific ...
Date: January 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities

Description: The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fundamentals of relativistic particle beam optics

Description: This lecture introduces the nonaccelerator-specialist to the motion of charged particles in a Storage Ring. The topics of discussion are restricted to the linear and nonlinear dynamics of a single particle in the transverse plane, i.e., the plane perpendicular to the direction of motion. The major omissions for a complete review of accelerator theory, for which a considerable literature exists, are the energy and phase oscillations (1). Other important accelerator physics aspects not treated here are the collective instabilities (2), the role of synchrotron radiation in electron storage rings (3), scattering processes (4), and beam-beam effects in colliding beam facilities (5). Much of the discussion that follows applies equally well to relativistic electron, proton, or ion synchrotrons. In this narrative, we refer to the particle as electron. After a broad overview, the magnetic forces acting on the electrons and the associated differential equations of motion are discussed. Solutions of the equations are given without derivation; the method of solution is outlined. and references for deeper studies are given. In this paper, the word electron is used to signify electron or positron. The dynamics of a single particle are not affected by the sign of its charge when the magnetic field direction is changed accordingly.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Cornacchia, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

Description: During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.
Date: December 31, 1988
Creator: Robinson, S. & Cantwell, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

Description: SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Cantwell, K. & St. Pierre, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1990 Activity report for 1986-1992

Description: As discussed in last year`s Activity Report, a fairly complete analysis of SPEAR problems was performed in concert with SLAC, and a major maintenance/improvement process was initiated in the spring of 1989. This run made it apparent that SPEAR will remain a very useful and impressive synchrotron radiation storage ring for at least a decade, given a steady maintenance and improvement program. More details about SPEAR functioning during the run, as well as SPEAR improvements, are contained in Chapter I. The formal SPEAR injector construction project was completed in November, 1990, on-time and on-budget. Although DOE was not able to provide anticipated FY90 commissioning funds, preliminary commissioning was performed and 2.3 GeV injection to SPEAR was demonstrated. A discussion of the Injector project is contained in Chapter II. Commissioning of the injector and the injector/SPEAR complex is continuing in 1991 with Users participating during the May-September period. This user participation allowed normal experimentation, so that systems could be tested critically, but with the commissioning process having higher priority than data acquisition. Another major event in 1990 was the full dedication of SPEAR to the synchrotron radiation program. Previously SPEAR was considered a high energy physics machine that was partially dedicated to synchrotron radiation. The full dedication means that the accelerator can be modified and improved for synchrotron radiation research. Despite the heavy emphasis on completing the Injector, many beam line improvements were achieved, as described in Chapter IV. Among these was the optimization of stations 6-2 and 10-2, the provision of a considerably larger hutch for Station 1-5, which contains the area detector diffractometer, and the introduction of white light capability on 10-2. The provision of good beam during the month of April made an appreciable amount of experimentation possible. These and other runs are described in Chapter VI.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Cantwell, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

Description: For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Cantwell, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department