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Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals

Description: New coal gasification processes are now being developed which can generate electricity with high thermal efficiency either in a combined gas-turbine, steam-turbine cycle or in a fuel cell. Both of these coal-to-electricity pathways require that the coal-derived fuel gas be at a high temperature and be free of potential pollutants, such as sulfur compounds. Unfortunately, some high-sulfur Illinois coals also contain significant chlorine which converts into hydrogen chloride (HC1) in the coal-gas. This project investigates the effect of HC1, in concentrations typical of a gasifier fed by high-chlorine Illinois coals, on zinc-titanate sorbents that are currently being developed for H{sub 2}S and COS removal from hot coal-gas. This study is designed to identify any deleterious changes in the sorbent caused by the HC1, both in adsorptive operation and in the regeneration cycle, and will pave the way to modify the sorbent formulation or the process operating procedure to remove HC1 along with the H{sub 2}S and COS from the coal-gas. This will negate any harmful consequences of utilizing high-chlorine Illinois in these processes. The bench- scale fluidized bed has been modified to prevent potential HC1 corrosion and startup experiments have proven the reactor system operable and capable of yielding reliable experimental results. The first of the planned experiments in the project are now being performed. 1 fig.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: O'Brien, W.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal

Description: Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost--effective of desulfurizing Illinois coal is non-existent at the present time. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds, relative to fragmentation of the coal macromolecule via C-C, C-O, and C-N bond cleavage. During this funding period, we plan to carry out examinations of: (a) the effects of various reaction conditions on radical-initiated and Lewis acid-catalyzed C-S bond cleavages; (b) the effects of caustic impregnation and subsequent alcoholic reflux on C-S bond cleavage strategies; (c) the reactions of coal model compounds with electron-deficient substrates; (d) examinations of photooxidative C-S bond cleavage reactions; (e) the effects of moderate (300--400{degrees}C) temperatures and pressures as well as ultrasonic radiation on (a) - (c). Also planned are differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) examinations of selected C-S bond cleavage protocols, including those on Illinois coals that possess varying amounts of organic and inorganic sulfur.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Bausch, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched

Description: The goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to produce clean, desulfurized, premium-quality chars from the Illinois basin coals. This goal is achieved by utilizing the effective capabilty of smectites in combination with methane to manipulate the char yields. The major objectives are: to determine the optimum water- ground particle size for the maximum reduction of pyrite and minerals by the selective-bitumen agglomeration process; to evaluate the type of smectite and its interlamellar cation which enhances the premium-quality char yields; to find the mode of dispersion of smectites in clean coal which retards the agglomeration of char during mild gasification; to probe the conditions that maximize the desulfurized clean-char yields under a combination of methane+oxygen or helium+oxygen; to characterize and accomplish a material balance of chars, liquids, and gases produced during mild gasification; to identify the conditions which reject dehydrated smectites from char by the gravitational separation technique; and to determine the optimum seeding of chars with polymerized maltene for flammability and transportation.
Date: January 3, 1992
Creator: Smith, G.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced physical coal cleaning to comply with potential air toxic regulations. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

Description: Studies have indicated that the potentially hazardous trace elements found in coal have a strong affinity for coal pyrite. Thus, by maximizing the rejection of pyrite, one can minimize the trace element content of a given coal while also reducing sulfur emissions. The pyrite in most Illinois Basin coals, however, is finely disseminated within the coal matrix. Therefore, to remove the pyrite using physical coal cleaning techniques, the pyrite must be liberated by grinding the coal to ultrafine particle sizes. Fortunately, the coals being fed to pulverized coal boilers (PCB) are already ground to a very fine size, i.e., 70% passing 200 mesh. Therefore, this research project will investigate the use of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies for cleaning PCB feed as a compliance strategy. Work in this quarter has focused on the processing of a PCB feed sample collected from Central Illinois Power`s Newton Power Station using column flotation and an enhanced gravity separator as separate units and in a circuitry arrangement. The PCB feed sample having a low ash content of about 12% was further cleaned to 6% while achieving a very high energy recovery of about 90% in a single stage column flotation operation. Enhanced gravity treatment is believed to be providing excellent total sulfur rejection values, although with inferior ash rejection for the {minus}400 mesh size fraction. The circuitry arrangement with the Falcon concentrator as the primary cleaner followed by the Microcel column resulted in an excellent ash rejection performance, which out performed the release analysis. Trace element analyses of the samples collected from these tests will be conducted during the next report period.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C. & Wang, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced physical coal cleaning to comply with potential air toxic regulations. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

Description: Studies have indicated that the potentially hazardous trace elements found in coal have a strong affinity for coal pyrite. Thus, by maximizing the rejection of pyrite, one can minimize the trace element content of a given coal while also reducing sulfur emissions. The pyrite in most Illinois Basin coals, however, is finely disseminated within the coal matrix. Therefore, to remove the pyrite using physical coal cleaning techniques, the pyrite must be liberated by grinding the coal to ultrafine particle sizes. Fortunately, the coals being fed to pulverized coal boilers (PCB) are already ground to a very fine size, i.e., 70% passing 200 mesh. Therefore, this research project will investigate the use of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies for cleaning PCB feed as a compliance strategy. Work in this quarter has focused on the processing of a run-of-mine coal sample collected from Amax Coal Company`s Delta Coal mine using column flotation and an enhanced gravity separator as separate units and in circuitry arrangements. The {minus}60 mesh run-of-mine sample having an ash content of about 22% was cleaned to 6% while achieving a very high energy recovery of about 87% and a sulfur rejection value of 53% in a single stage column flotation operation. Enhanced gravity treatment is believed to be providing excellent total sulfur rejection values, although with inferior ash rejection for the {minus}400 mesh size fraction. The circuitry arrangement with the Falcon concentrator as the primary cleaner followed by the Packed-Column resulted in an excellent ash rejection performance, which out performed the release analysis. Trace element analyses of the samples collected from these tests will be conducted during the next report period.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C.; Mohanty, M.K. & Wang, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} with methane over molybdenum catalyst. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

Description: One of the primary concerns in coal utilization is the emission of sulfur compounds, especially SO{sub 2}. This project deals with catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} with methane using molybdenum sulfide catalyst supported on different activated carbons: Darco TRS, Norit ROZ-3, and an activated carbon prepared from Illinois coal IBC-110. The work conducted during this quarter has concentrated on continuation of the synthesis of activated carbon derived from Illinois coal IBC-110, modification and improvement of the apparatus for the catalyst testing, ESCA (XPS) analysis of the catalyst (10% MoS{sub 2} on Darco TRS activated carbon), and experiments in the temperature range of 450{degree}C--600{degree}C for the S0{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} ratio equal 1:1. XPS study confirmed that Mo is present in the form of Mo+4 and S in the form of S-2. The catalytic experiments of SO{sub 2} reduction with CH{sub 4} showed that for both Darco TRS and ROZ-3 supports, S0{sub 2} conversion increases with the temperature. Also, the catalyst having 20% loading of MoS{sub 2} on Darco TRS support shows the highest S0{sub 2} conversion over 10% or 15% loadings on Darco TRS. In contrast, for the ROZ-3 support, the catalyst having a 15% loading shows the highest activity. Additionally, it was observed that conversions of S0{sub 2} at 600{degree}C for both supports are comparable to each other when catalysts with 20% loadings are used; at lower temperatures, the activities are quite different with the conversions being higher for Darco TRS support.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Wiltowski, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lightweight combustion residues-based structural materials for use in mines. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

Description: The overall goal of this PrOject is to develop, design, and test artificial supports (post and crib members), for use in mines, which will be manufactured from coal combustion by-products (CCB) based lightweight structural materials. During the last quarter (Dec. 1, 1994--Feb. 28, 1995), it was reported that low LOI ({approx}5%) F-fly ash-based lightweight materials with density ranging from 70-1 110 pcf and compressive strength ranging from about 1,500 psi to 5,000 psi had been developed. During this quarter, 1) similar materials were developed using higher LOI ({approx}1O%) F-fly ash, 2) performance of materials using nylon fibers rather than polypropylene fibers was examined, 3) effect of addition of small amounts of FBC spent bed material on strength-deformation properties was evaluated, 4) flexural strength tests were performed on 2 in. X 2 in. X 12 in. cast beams, 5) compressive strength tests were performed on cast hollow cylinders (6 in. outer diameter, 2.762 in. inner diameter and 12 in. long) and 6) limited number of tests were conducted to determine the effect of mixing speed on strength of developed materials. The results of these studies indicate that 1) suitable lightweight materials using 60--65% higher LOI F-fly ash can be developed for fabrication of artificial supports, 2) nylon fibers perform significantly better than Polypropylene fibers, 3) loss of strength and deformability due to the use of higher LOI fly ash can be offset to some extent by adding 5--10% FBC spent bed material, 4) relationship between flexural strength and compressive strength, similar to that in concrete exists, 5) strength-deformation properties of hollow cylinders are similar to 3 in. X 6 in. solid cylinders, and 6) strength and deformation modulus increase with mixing speed. Two mixes for final development of lightweight materials have been identified and final test` will begin June 1, 1995.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Chugh, Y.P.; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Ghosh, A.K.; Palmer, S.R.; Peng, Suping & Xiao, Y
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. Technical progress report, March 1--May 31, 1995

Description: This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that IBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During the first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer was eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal was confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions was revealed. During the second quarter, working with IBC-108 coal (2.3% organic S, 0.4% pyrite S), the effects of different extraction solvents were examined. A new pretreatment which combines alkali with linseed oil was discovered. Best organic sulfur removal is approximately 26% using alkali pretreatment combined with linseed oil at 100[degrees]C. BTU loses can be kept to a minimum of 3% with proper use of solvents. During this third quarter the effects of different ratios of oil:coal, different temperatures, and different reaction times were completely examined. The effects of alkali on sulfur removal were further investigated. Best organic sulfur removal reaches 34% using ammonia pretreatment, then oil and finally aqNA2CO3 extraction.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, Feng & Gholson, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996

Description: The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

Description: On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D. & Esling, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined removal of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} from flue gas using non-thermal plasma. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

Description: The removal of NO{sub x} from flue gas was studied during this period. About 44% of NO{sub x} in concentrations of about 400 ppm and 100% of NO{sub x} in concentrations below 80 ppm can be removed without any chemical additives. Also some pre experiments have been done on the combined removal of S0{sub 2} and NO. Indications are that the NO in the flue gas helps the removal of S0{sub 2}. Work is continuing on the combined removal at present.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Dhali, S.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

Description: Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method will be investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. During this first quarter the selection of base for pretreatment and extraction (Task 1) has been completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. About 40% of sulfur is removed from IBC-108 coal using 5% NaOH for pretreatment followed by linseed oil oxidation in air and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} extraction.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F. & Wang, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Desulfurization of coal: Enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

Description: Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development of viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigates the application of phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions than otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidations for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal. During this quarter aliquots of the IBC-101 coal have been ground to various particle sizes in an attempt to find the optimum physical pretreatment for mineral, especially pyrite, removal. Analysis of these various aliquots shows them to be representative of the original coal. In addition, preliminary desulfurization reactions using fly ash and scrubber sludges have been performed on an unoxidized IBC-101 sample. Results will be available next quarter. Also, SEM-EDAX analysis of the fly ash indicates that it contains oxides that have shown activity in base desulfurization reactions.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Palmer, S.R. & Hippo, E.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

Description: A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1993--94 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900{degrees}C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter there were two major accomplishments.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Crelling, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Composition modification of zinc titanate sorbents for hot gas desulfurization. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

Description: For new coal gasification systems, zinc titanate sorbents are being developed to remove sulfur from the hot product gas prior to its use in combined cycle turbines and high temperature fuel cells. Although most of the properties of these sorbents are very attractive, there are still concerns about durability over many sulfidation-regeneration cycles and zinc losses due to vaporization. Doping the zinc titanate with other metal ions could alleviate both concerns, which are the objectives of this project. A screening study was completed during the second quarter in which Ni, Cr, Cu, Mg, and Al were evaluated as dopants in zinc titanate. Measurements that were made include solubility, crush strength, and sulfidation-regeneration behavior in a thermogravimetric analyzer. A formulation containing Cr showed the most promise. It and other formulations containing Cr will be emphasized during the remainder of the year. Fixed bed experiments will start during the third quarter.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Swisher, J.H. & Datta, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A modified release analysis procedure using advanced froth flotation mechanisms: Technical report, March 1, 1996-May 31, 1996

Description: Recent studies indicate that the optimum separation performances achieved by multiple stage cleaning using various column flotation technologies and single stage cleaning using a Packed-Flotation Column are superior to the performance achieved by the traditional release procedure, especially in terms of pyritic sulfur rejection. This superior performance is believed to be the result of the advanced flotation mechanisms provided by column flotation technologies. Thus, the objective of this study is to develop a suitable process utilizing the advanced froth flotation mechanisms to characterize the true flotation response of a coal sample. Work in this reporting period concentrated on developing a modified coal flotation characterization procedure, termed as Advanced Flotation Washability (AFW) technique. The new apparatus used for this procedure is essentially a batch operated packed-column device equipped with a controlled wash water system. Several experiments were conducted using the AFW technique on a relatively high sulfur, -100 mesh Illinois No. 5 run-of-mine coal sample collected from a local coal preparation plant. Similar coal characterization experiments were also conducted using the traditional release and tree analysis procedures. The best performance curve generated using the AFW technique was found to be superior to the optimum curve produced by the traditional procedures. For example, at a combustible recovery of 80%, a 19% improvement in the reduction of the pyritic sulfur content was achieved by the AFW method while the ash reduction was also enhanced by 4%. Several tests are on-going to solidify the AFW procedure and verify the above finding by conducting Anova analyses to evaluate the repeatability of the AFW method and the statistical significance of the difference in the performance achieved from the traditional and modified coal characterization procedures.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Honaker, R.Q., Mohanty, M.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1995

Description: On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy - Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SITJC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC-30252). Under the agreement SIUC will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mine workings, and assess the environmental impact of such underground placements. This report discusses the technical progress achieved during the period October 1 - December 31, 1995. Rapid Aging Test columns were placed in operation during the second quarter of 1995, and some preliminary data were acquired during this quarter. These data indicate that the highly caustic pH is initially generated in the pneumatic mix, but that such pH is short lived. The initial pH rapidly declines to the range of 8 to 9. Leachates in this pH range will have little or no effect on environmental concerns. Dedicated sampling equipment was installed in the groundwater monitoring wells at the proposed placement site at the Peabody Number 10 mine. Also, the groundwater monitoring wells were {open_quotes}developed{close_quotes} during the quarter to remove the fines trapped in the sand pack and screen. A new procedure was used in this process, and proved successful. A series of tests concerning the geotechnical characteristics of the pneumatic mixes were conducted. Results show that both moisture content and curing time have a direct effect on the strength of the mixes. These are, of course, the expected general results. The Christmas holidays and the closing of the University during an extended period affected the progress of the program during the quarter. However, the program is essentially on schedule, both technically and fiscally, and any delays will be overcome during the first quarter of 1996.
Date: May 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

Description: On September 30, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Souther Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines``. Under the agreement SIUC will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement, using virtually dry materials, and (2) hydraulic placement, using a ``paste`` mixture of materials with about 70% solids. Phase II of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase II is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a surface demonstration-test of both technologies. During the current quarter the main thrust was to develop the equipment necessary for the program. Shop drawings were completed for the pneumatic placement equipment, and purchase orders issued for many of the component parts. The final pneumatic placement system will be assembled in the SIUC Carterville facility.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

Description: On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy - Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned underground coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement, using virtually dry materials, and (2) hydraulic placement, using a {open_quotes}paste{close_quotes} mixture of materials with about 70% solids. Phase II of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase II is to develop and fabricate the equipment for placing the coal combustion by-products underground, and to conduct a demonstration of the technologies on the surface. Therefore, this quarter has been largely devoted to developing specifications for equipment components, visiting fabrication plants throughout Southern Illinois to determine their capability for building the equipment components in compliance with the specifications, and delivering the components in a timely manner.
Date: May 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1998

Description: The DESEVAL-TRANS program is developed for the purpose of helping the engineer to design and economically evaluate coal combustion byproduct transportation systems that will operate between the power plant and the disposal site. The objective of the research project was to explore the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of disposing coal combustion byproducts in underground mines in Illinois. The DESEVAL-TRANS (short for Design and Evaluation of Transportation Systems) was developed in the Materials Handling and Systems Economics branch of the overall project. Four types of coal combustion byproducts were targeted for transportation and handling: Conventional fly ash; Scrubber sludge; Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) fly ash; and Spent-bed ash. Several transportation and handling systems that could handle these byproducts were examined. These technologies were classified under three general categories: Truck; Rail; and Container. The purpose of design models is to determine the proper number of transport units, silo capacity, loading and unloading rates, underground placement capacity, number of shifts, etc., for a given case, defined by a distance-tonnage combination. The cost computation models were developed for the determination of the operating and capital costs. An economic evaluation model, which is common to all categories, was also developed to establish the cost-per-ton of byproduct transported.
Date: September 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

Description: The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Chugh, Y.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

Description: On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. The major event during the quarter was the demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for loading and transporting coal combustion residues in the SEEC developed Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The demonstration was held on November 17, 1994, at the Illinois Power Company Baldwin power plant, and was attended by about eighty (80) invited guest. Also during the quarter meetings were held with Peabody Coal Company officials to finalize the area in the Peabody No. 10 mine to be used for the placement of coal combustion residues. Work under the Materials Handling and Systems Economics area continued, particularly in refining the costs and systems configuration and in economic evaluation of various systems using equipment leasing rather than equipment purchases. Likewise, work progressed on residues characterization, with some preparations being made for long-term testing.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion of char-coal waste pellets for high efficiency and low NO{sub x}. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

Description: To maintain market share, new uses must be found for Illinois coals in the largest end use area, namely power generation. To this end, the suitability of Illinois coal for high efficiency power plants like combined cycles must be investigated. This approach involves partial gasification of the coal to produce fuel gas for the topping cycle gas turbines, while the residual char is burnt in the gas turbine exhaust to produce steam for the Rankine bottoming cycle. This project seeks to improve the combustion characteristics of the residual char by pelletizing it with waste coal in order to improve its combustor residence time and carbon conversion efficiency. At the same time, attempts are made to reduce pollutant emissions. During this quarter, the residual char produced by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation in their pyrolyzer has been pelletized with Illinois gob coal in various proportions. Combustion tests have been performed in a laboratory scale circulating fluidized bed combustor. Preliminary results show that the pellets are much easier to burn and exhibit high carbon conversion efficiencies. Further combustion tests are in progress.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Rajan, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

Description: A new use for Illinois coal is as fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as first step in steel production. Because of cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. Purpose of this study is to evaluate combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a pilot plant test facility. (Limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high S and Cl contents are suitable for blast furnace injection.) This proposal is intended to complete the study under way with Armco and Inland and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for injection. Main feature of current work is testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s pilot plant coal combustion facility. During this quarter, two additional 300-pound samples of coal (IBCSP-110 Springfield No. 5 and an Appalachian coal) were delivered. Six Illinois Basin coals were analyzed with the CANMET model and compared with other bituminous coals from the Appalachians, France, Poland, South Africa, and Colombia. Based on computer modeling, lower rank bituminous coals, including coal from the Illinois Basin, compare well in injection with a variety of other bituminous coals.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Crelling, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department