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Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system

Description: Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D. & Wen, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sub-pilot testing of an acoustically enhanced cyclone for PFBC

Description: The overall program objective is to demonstrate, on the subpilot-scale, the effectiveness of an acoustically enhanced cyclone collector under high temperature, high pressure conditions found in coal-fired pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) combined cycle power generating systems. The data obtained will be used to design an acoustically enhanced cyclone gas cleanup system which can meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) particulate control level with capital and operating costs significantly lower than currently available with conventional cyclones and post turbine particulate control.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Galica, M.A. & Rawlins, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas fired Advanced Turbine System

Description: The primary objective of the first phase of the Advanced Gas Turbine System (ATS) program was the concept definition of an advanced engine system that meets efficiency and emission goals far exceeding those that can be provided with today`s equipment. The thermal efficiency goal for such an advanced industrial engine was set at 50% some 15 percentage points higher than current equipment levels. Exhaust emissions goals for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UH) were fixed at 8 parts per million by volume (ppmv), 20 ppmv, and 20 ppmv respectively, corrected to 15% oxygen (O{sub 2}) levels. Other goals had to be addressed; these involved reducing the cost of power produced by 10 percent and improving or maintaining the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) at current levels. This advanced gas turbine was to be fueled with natural gas, and it had to embody features that would allow it bum coal or coal derived fuels.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: LeCren, R. T. & White, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system

Description: Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Roberts, P. B.; LeCren, R. T.; Cowell, L. H.; Galica, M. A.; Stephenson, M. D. & Wen, C. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High performance steam cogeneration (proof-of-concept phases). Phase 2, HRSG 500-hour test report: Final report

Description: Recent advances in small once-through Alloy 800 steam generators, improved materials technology, and application of small industrial gas turbine technology to steam turbine cogeneration offers the potential to make a step increase in steam temperature from around 1000{degree}F, where industry has been for almost fifty years, to 1500{degree}F. In small cogeneration systems, it is economically practical to introduce new technology and make a step change in temperature where it may not be possible (given the regulatory environment and economic risk) for a major change in steam temperature to be introduced in the hundreds of megawatt size of an electric utility. Increasing the peak steam temperature in a steam turbine cycle allows more work to be extracted or electrical power to be generated from a given quantity of heat input. Figure 1 plots steam efficiency as a function of superheat steam temperature and pressure for a turbine-back pressure of 166 psia. This figure clearly shows that increasing the steam conditions from the typical current practice of 900{degree}F and 900 psia to 1500{degree}F and 1500 psia will increase the steam cycle efficiency by 53%. The combination of higher cycle efficiency with an advanced high efficiency steam turbine design provides a substantial increase in turbine output power for a given steam flowrate. The output of this advanced high temperature steam turbine is approximately twice that of a current industrial practive turbine for the same turbine flowrate as seen in Figure 2.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Campbell, A. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas fired advanced turbine system. Phase 1, System scoping and feasibility studies

Description: The basic concept thus derived from the Ericsson cycle is an intercooled, recuperated, and reheated gas turbine. Theoretical performance analyses, however, showed that reheat at high turbine rotor inlet temperatures (TRIT) did not provide significant efficiency gains and that the 50 percent efficiency goal could be met without reheat. Based upon these findings, the engine concept adopted as a starting point for the gas-fired advanced turbine system is an intercooled, recuperated (ICR) gas turbine. It was found that, at inlet temperatures greater than 2450{degrees}F, the thermal efficiency could be maintained above 50%, provided that the turbine cooling flows could be reduced to 7% of the main air flow or lower. This dual and conflicting requirement of increased temperatures and reduced cooling will probably force the abandonment of traditional air cooled turbine parts. Thus, the use of either ceramic materials or non-air cooling fluids has to be considered for the turbine nozzle guide vanes and turbine blades. The use of ceramic components for the proposed engine system is generally preferred because of the potential growth to higher temperatures that is available with such materials.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: LeCren, R. T. & White, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sub-pilot testing of an acoustically enhanced cyclone for PFBC

Description: The overall program objective is to demonstrate, on the subpilot-scale, the effectiveness of an acoustically enhanced cyclone collector under high temperature, high pressure conditions found in coal-fired pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) combined cycle power generating systems. The data obtained will be used to design an acoustically enhanced cyclone gas cleanup system which can meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) particulate control level with capital and operating costs significantly lower than currently available with conventional cyclones and post turbine particulate control.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Galica, M. A. & Rawlins, D. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

Description: Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D. & Wen, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development

Description: Objective is to provide the conceptual design and product development plant for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000 (secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS). This report addresses the remaining 7 of the 9 subtasks in Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components: catalytic combustion, recuperator, high- temperature turbine disc, advanced control system, and ceramic materials.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department