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Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2001

Description: The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SRS near Aiken, South Carolina. The Laboratory's research mission during the 2001 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of one book and 83 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 77 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 54. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, global reptile decline, phytoremediation, and radioecology. Dr. Domy Adriano authored the second edition of his book ''Trace Elements in Terrestrial Environments: Biogeochemistry, Bioavailability, and Risks of Metals'', which was recently published by Springer-Verlag. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of many important aspects of trace elements in the environment. The first edition of the book, published in 1986, has become a widely acclaimed and cited reference. International attention was focused on the problem of reptile species decline with the publication of an article on this topic in the journal ''Bioscience'' in August, 2000. The article's authors included Dr. Whit Gibbons and a number of other SREL herpetologists who researched the growing worldwide problem of decline of reptile species. Factors related to these declines include habitat loss and degradation, introduction of invasive species, environmental pollution, disease, global ...
Date: June 30, 2001
Creator: Bertsch, Paul M.; Janecek, Laura & Rosier, Brenda
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997

Description: This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Wein, G. & Rosier, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduction of sample volume and waste generation in acid/base titrations using microelectrodes

Description: The Analytical Development Section (ADS) has developed microelectrode methods for use with pH titrations and pH determinations. These microelectrode methods offer increased sensitivity and enable analyses to be done with smaller sample and buffer volumes than are used with standard size electrodes. This report establishes the technical validity of the methods and describes the application of these methods to decreased detection limits, decreased waste generation, and decreased radiation exposure.
Date: March 22, 1996
Creator: Ekechukwu, A.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1998

Description: This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Wein, G. & Rosier, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Four Mile Creek bottomland restoration program. Final report

Description: On the Savannah River Site (SRS), nuclear production reactors were cooled by a once-through cooling cycle, using water from the Savannah River and discharging the effluent to small tributaries of the Savannah River. Four Mile Creek (also known as Fourmile Branch) is a third order tributary of the Savannah River on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. It received thermal effluent from C Reactor from 1955 to 1985, which increased the flow rate, water depth and water temperature. Prior to 1955, the base flow was approximately one cubic meter per second, but increased, with the reactor effluent, to approximately 11 cubic meters per second, raising the water depth in the channel by 15 to 30 cm. Effluent temperature at the outfall was approximately 60 C and at the delta was 40 to 45 C, depending on the operation level of the reactor, the season of the year and the specific meteorological conditions. The increased flow rate also increased erosion in the upper reaches of the stream with deposition of this eroded material occurring in the delta averaging 60 cm of newly deposited sand on top of the former substrate.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: McLeod, K.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

Description: Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.
Date: August 31, 1997
Creator: Davis, C.E. & Janecek, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995

Description: The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Smith, M.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The goal of this report is to establish a protocol for assessing risks to non-human populations exposed to environmental stresses typically found on many DOE sites. The authors think that they can achieve this by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments, and by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables (such as age-specific survivorship, reproductive output, age at maturity and longevity). This research is needed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, and radiation with concomitant exposure to chemicals. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization. The experimental facility will allow them to develop a credible assessment tool for appraising ecological risks, and to evaluate the effects of radionuclide/chemical synergisms on non-human species. This report summarizes work completed midway of a 3-year project that began in November 1996. Emphasis to date has centered on three areas: (1) developing a molecular probe to measure stable chromosomal aberrations known as reciprocal translocations, (2) constructing an irradiation facility where the statistical power inherent in replicated mesocosms can be used to address the response of non-human organisms to exposures from low levels of radiation and metal contaminants, and (3) quantifying responses of organisms living in contaminated mesocosms and field sites.'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Scott, D.; Rowe, C.; Bedford, J. & Whicker, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'This report summarizes the first year''s progress of research funded under the Department of Energy''s Environmental Management Science Program. The research was initiated to better determine ecological risks from toxic and radioactive contaminants. More precisely, the research is designed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and to identify characteristics of non-human populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, as is typically found on many DOE sites. The authors propose to establish a protocol to assess risks to non-human species at higher levels of biological organization by relating molecular damage to more relevant responses that reflect population health. They think that they can achieve this by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables, and by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization.'
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, D.; Bedford, J. & Whicker, F.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UnCensor{copyright} v4.0

Description: UnCensor{copyright} is a program that estimates the mean, standard deviation, variance, and the confidence interval on the mean of left censored data sets. At present, the program can provide estimates for normal and two-parameter lognormal data sets. Large (N > 20) and small (N {le} 20) data sets can be handled. UnCensor{copyright} provides estimates by the application of several statistical methods. At present, these methods include the following. The explanations are taken from the appendix of the companion paper for this program (Newman et al. 1989 and Newman 1995.)
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Newman, M.C.; Greene, K.D. & Dixon, P.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Linking Chemical Speciation, Desorption Kinetics, and Bioavailability of U and Ni in Aged-Contaminated Sediments: A Scientific Basis for Natural Attenuation and Risk Assessment

Description: The extent to which heavy metals and radionuclides pose an environmental hazard depends on their potential for release to and transport in the environment, i.e., environmental availability, and their potential for introduction into biological systems, i.e., bioavailability. Although there exists a substantial body of literature pertaining to the fate, distribution, and bioavailability of contaminant metals in model laboratory systems, few studies have examined the biogeochemical cycling of heavy metals in complex aged-contaminated soils and sediments at a fundamental level. Even fewer have coupled detailed information on chemical speciation from state-of-the-art microscopic analytical and spectroscopic techniques with macroscopic observations obtained using indirect chemical extractions, metal desorption and leaching experiments, and biological uptake and toxicity assays.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Bertsch, Paul M.; Sowder, Andrew & Jackson, Brian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STResS (Simulated Toxicant-Related Stress) documentation

Description: STResS (Simulated Toxicant-Related Stress) is a program written in DEC FORTRAN v. 6.2. This program can be run either interactively or batch mode. This program is designed to model the effects of toxicant exposure on a simulated population of a specific species, as well as the effects of the toxicant on the demographic and genetic characteristics. The toxic effect on the time-to-death is based on an accelerated failure time model in which the time-to-death depends on size, sex and genotype, toxicant concentration, and frequency and duration of exposure. Sexual, fecundity, and meiotic drive/gametic selection can also be included. Multiple simulations can be run for a user-specified number of gestation periods of user-specified length. The effect of winter can be included, and the exposure duration can be changed once during each simulation, if desired.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Greene, K.D.; Newman, M.C. & Jagoe, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site

Description: The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory has completed 10 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) on the Savannah River Site. This progress report examines water quality studies on streams peripheral to the DWPF construction site and examines the effectiveness of refuge ponds'' in ameliorating the effects of construction on local amphibians. Individual papers on these topics are indexed separately. 93 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs. (MHB)
Date: December 1, 1988
Creator: Scott, D.E.; Pechmann, J.H.K.; Knox, J.N.; Estes, R.A.; McGregor, J.H. & Bailey, K. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wetland vegetation establishment in L-Lake

Description: Wetland vegetation was transplanted from PAR Pond to L-Lake between January and August, 1987. Approximately 100,000 individual plants representing over 40 species were transplanted along the southern shoreline. Three zones of vegetation were created: (1) submersed/floating-leaved, (2) emergent, (3) upper emergent/shrub. During the summers of 1987, 1988, 1989, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory sampled the vegetation in 54 permanent transects located in planted (N=32) and unplanted areas (N=22). The 1989 vegetation data from L-Lake were compared to 1985 data from PAR Pond.
Date: July 1, 1990
Creator: Kroeger, S.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

Description: The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.
Date: July 31, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

Description: This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Vaitkus, M. R.; Wein, G. R. & Johnson, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was built on the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the mid-1980's. The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has completed 12 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF complex. Prior to construction, the 600-acre site (S-Area) contained a Carolina bay and the headwaters of a stream. Research conducted by the SREL has focused primarily on four questions related to these wetlands: (1) Prior to construction, what fauna and flora were present at the DWPF site and at similar, yet undisturbed, alternative sites (2) By comparing the Carolina bay at the DWPF site (Sun Bay) with an undisturbed control Carolina bay (Rainbow Bay), what effect is construction having on the organisms that inhabited the DWPF site (3) By comparing control streams with streams on the periphery of the DWPF site, what effect is construction having on the peripheral streams (4) How effective have efforts been to lessen the impacts of construction, both with respect to erosion control measures and the construction of refuge ponds'' as alternative breeding sites for amphibians that formerly bred at Sun Bay Through the long-term census-taking of biota at the DWPF site and Rainbow Bay, SREL has begun to evaluate the impact of construction on the biota and the effectiveness of mitigation efforts. Similarly, the effects of erosion from the DWPF site on the water quality of S-Area peripheral streams are being assessed. This research provides supporting data relevant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, Executive Orders 11988 (Floodplain Management) and 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and United States Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10CFR1022).
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Pechmann, J.H.K.; Scott, D.E.; McGregor, J.H.; Estes, R.A. & Chazal, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mammals of the Savannah River Site

Description: This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, The Forbearer Census'' and White-tailed Deer Studies''. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master's theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Cothran, E.G.; Smith, M.H.; Wolff, J.O. & Gentry, J.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mammals of the Savannah River Site

Description: This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, ``The Forbearer Census`` and ``White-tailed Deer Studies``. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master`s theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Cothran, E. G.; Smith, M. H.; Wolff, J. O. & Gentry, J. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Species status of Mill Creek Elliptio

Description: This report discusses environmental effects of the Savannah River Plant on aqautic populations in Mill Creek and surrounding tributaries. Of particular concern was the status of Elliptio. Genetics and phenotypic characteristics have shown that the current classification system is not adequate for these populations. The appendices characterize genetic variability at different loci, electrophoretic data, allele frequencies, sympatric species, and anatomical characters.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Davis, G. M. & Mulvey, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site. FY 1989--1990 annual report

Description: The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was built on the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the mid-1980`s. The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has completed 12 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF complex. Prior to construction, the 600-acre site (S-Area) contained a Carolina bay and the headwaters of a stream. Research conducted by the SREL has focused primarily on four questions related to these wetlands: (1) Prior to construction, what fauna and flora were present at the DWPF site and at similar, yet undisturbed, alternative sites? (2) By comparing the Carolina bay at the DWPF site (Sun Bay) with an undisturbed control Carolina bay (Rainbow Bay), what effect is construction having on the organisms that inhabited the DWPF site? (3) By comparing control streams with streams on the periphery of the DWPF site, what effect is construction having on the peripheral streams? (4) How effective have efforts been to lessen the impacts of construction, both with respect to erosion control measures and the construction of ``refuge ponds`` as alternative breeding sites for amphibians that formerly bred at Sun Bay? Through the long-term census-taking of biota at the DWPF site and Rainbow Bay, SREL has begun to evaluate the impact of construction on the biota and the effectiveness of mitigation efforts. Similarly, the effects of erosion from the DWPF site on the water quality of S-Area peripheral streams are being assessed. This research provides supporting data relevant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, Executive Orders 11988 (Floodplain Management) and 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and United States Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10CFR1022).
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Pechmann, J. H. K.; Scott, D. E.; McGregor, J. H.; Estes, R. A. & Chazal, A. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wetland vegetation establishment in L-Lake

Description: Wetland vegetation was transplanted from PAR Pond to L-Lake between January and August, 1987. Approximately 100,000 individual plants representing over 40 species were transplanted along the southern shoreline. Three zones of vegetation were created: (1) submersed/floating-leaved, (2) emergent, (3) upper emergent/shrub. During the summers of 1987, 1988, 1989, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory sampled the vegetation in 54 permanent transects located in planted (N=32) and unplanted areas (N=22). The 1989 vegetation data from L-Lake were compared to 1985 data from PAR Pond.
Date: July 1, 1990
Creator: Kroeger, S. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological studies on the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) on the Savannah River Plant

Description: The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is the largest vertebrate of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), reaching a maximum length of 3.7 meters (12 feet) and weighing up to 175 kg (385 pounds). Currently, populations in coastal South Carolina are considered Threatened, whereas populations in inland areas (such as the SRP) are still Endangered. Because of their legal status and economic and ecological importance, it is important to determine the environmental impacts of SRP operations on the local alligator population. The major objectives under the Endangered Species Program of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) were as follows: (1) document and compare the present status and distribution of alligators on the SRP to previous surveys, in order to determine long-term changes in population abundance; (2) establish baseline population and ecological parameters of the Steel Creek population so that the ecological effects of L-Reactor operations can be determined, and (3) conduct ecological research on the immediate impacts of thermal effluents on American alligators. Gladden et al., (1985) summarized data on previous population surveys, temporal changes in the Par Pond population, preliminary results of the Steel Creek surveys and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) research on the effects of thermal effluents. This report summarizes the current status of the SRP population, presents data on the abundance, movement patterns and activity cycles of the Steel Creek population, and presents additional data on the effect of cooling water releases on alligator ecology and behavior.
Date: June 1, 1986
Creator: Seigel, R.A.; Brandt, L.A.; Knight, J.L. & Novak, S.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wood Storks of the Birdsville Colony and swamps of the Savannah River Site: General overview of research findings, 1983--1990

Description: The population of Wood Storks (Mycteria americana) that breeds in the United States has decreased from an estimated 20,000 breeding pairs in 1930 to just under 5,000 pairs in 1980. Since 1980, the number has remained relatively stable, fluctuating between 3,500 and 5,500 breeding pairs. The decline prompted the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to list the United States population of Wood Storks as endangered in 1984. When the US Department of Energy (USDOE) decided to restart L-Reactor on the Savannah River Site (SRS), there was concern that when the reactor was restarted, cooling water flowing into the Steel Creek Delta would raise the water level and the area would become too deep for foraging storks. The potential loss of this area to storks was important because storks had been observed foraging in the Steel Creek Delta. The USDOE began consultation with the USFWS in April, 1984, and the USDOE subsequently agreed to develop and maintain alternative foraging habitat to replace the potential loss. In order to design and manage the alternate foraging ponds as effectively as possible, it was necessary to understand aspects of the biology of the storks, the characteristics of their foraging sites and the patterns of their use of the SRSS. Results are described.
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Coulter, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department