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Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: January-March 2003

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 January to 31 March 2003 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, PSI conducted preparation work on direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae and developed a design concept for photobioreactors for biofixation of CO{sub 2} and photovoltaic power generation. Aquasearch continued their effort on characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration and preparation for pilot scale demonstration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Nakamura, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of co2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: July-September 2002

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 July to 30 September 2002 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on feasibility demonstration of direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection and characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Nakamura, T.; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: January-March 2004

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 January to 31 March 2004 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch run first pilot scale production run with coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch started the second full scale carbon sequestration tests with propane combustion gases. Aquasearch also conducted modeling work to study the change in alkalinity in the medium resulting form microalgal photosynthesis and growth. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: October-December 2003

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October to 31 December 2003 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch run first pilot scale production run with coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch started the second full scale carbon sequestration tests with propane combustion gases. Aquasearch also conducted modeling work to study the change in alkalinity in the medium resulting form microalgal photosynthesis and growth. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of co2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: July-September 2004

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 July to 30 September 2004 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch run the first set of experiments with actual coal combustion gases with two different strains of microalgae. In addition further, full scale carbon sequestration tests with propane combustion gases were conducted. Aquasearch continued testing modifications to the coal combustor to allow for longer-term burns.
Date: December 2004
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of co2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: April-June 2002

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 April to 30 June 2002 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on feasibility demonstration of direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection and characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Nakamura, T.; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: October-December 2000

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period from 1 October to 31 December 2000. During this period planning of chemostat experiments at Aquasearch was initiated. These experiments will be used to select microalgae for the photobioreactor demonstrations. An initial survey of techniques for removing CO{sub 2} from coal-fired flue gas was begun. Chemical adsorption using MEA is the most mature technology and looks to be the most economically viable in the near future.
Date: March 1, 2001
Creator: Nakamura, T. & Senior, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: January-March 2001

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 January to 31 March 2001 in which Aquasearch tested 24 different species of microalgae for growth at three different temperatures. Eleven species were analyzed for the presence of high-value pigments. Most of the algae analyzed were good sources of industrially valuable pigments. Analysis of the methods for introducing and dissolving CO{sub 2} in the commercial bioreactor was begun this quarter.
Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: Nakamura, T. & Senior, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: April-June 2001

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 April to 30 June 2001 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on the component optimization work. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii initiated effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Nakamura, T.; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Steven M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: October-December 2004

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October to 31 December 2004 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch run the first set of experiments with actual coal combustion gases with two different strains of microalgae. In addition further, full scale carbon sequestration tests with propane combustion gases were conducted. Aquasearch continued testing modifications to the coal combustor to allow for longer-term burns.
Date: March 2005
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: October-December 2002

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October to 31 December 2002 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work conducted during the previous reporting period, PSI initiated work on feasibility demonstration of direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch continued their effort on selection and characterization of microalgae suitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: April 2003
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of co2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: April-June 2004

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 April to 30 June 2004 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch run further, pilot and full scale, carbon sequestration tests with actual propane combustion gases utilizing two different strains of microalgae. Aquasearch continued testing modifications to the coal combustor to allow for longer-term burns. Aquasearch also tested an alternative cell separation technology. University of Hawaii performed experiments at the Mera Pharmaceuticals facility in Kona in mid June to obtain data on the carbon venting rate out of the photobioreactor; gas venting rates were measured with an orifice flow meter and gas samples were collected for GC analysis to determine the carbon content of the vented gases.
Date: November 2004
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Extended Performance Handheld and Mobile Sensors for Remote Detection of Natural Gas Leaks

Description: This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.
Date: May 1, 2005
Creator: Frish, Michael B.; Green, B. David; Wainner, Richard T.; Scire-Scappuzzo, Francesca; Cataldi, Paul & Laderer, Matthew C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of co2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: April-June 2003

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 April to 30 June 2003 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, PSI delivered its coal reactor to Aquasearch. Aquasearch and PSI continued preparation work on direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch started their effort on economic analyses of commercial scale photobioreactor. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: September 1, 2003
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 from Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae Quarterly Technical Progress Report: Number 12

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 July to 30 September 2003 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch and PSI continued preparation work on direct feeding of coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch started the first full scale carbon sequestration tests with propane combustion gases. Aquasearch started to model the costs associated with biomass harvest from different microalgal strains. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: November 1, 2003
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 from Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae: Final Report

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 October 2000 to 31 March 2005 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. This report discusses results of the work pertaining to five tasks: Task 1--Supply of CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas to Photobioreactor; Task 2--Selection of Microalgae; Task 3--Optimization and Demonstration of Industrial Scale Photobioreactor; Task 4--Carbon Sequestration System Design; and Task 5--Economic Analysis. Based on the work conducted in each task summary conclusion is presented.
Date: April 1, 2005
Creator: Nakamura, T. & Senior, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion - A Comprehensive Assessment

Description: The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at UU focused on the behavior …
Date: June 30, 2001
Creator: Senior, C. L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G. P.; Shah, N.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J. O. L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance model for molten-carbonate fuel cells. Quarterly report, 5 January-5 April 1979

Description: Progress on the development of a performance model for molten carbonate fuel cells is reported. Key physical and chemical phenomena being modeled include mass transport, ohmic losses, electrode kinetics, fuel and oxidant utilization, gas phase convective heat transfer and inplane heat conduction through cell hardware. Numerical schemes have been developed and programmed to calculate overpotential versus current density curves for individual electrodes, the cell current density distribution, and the cell temperature distribution.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Wilemski, G.; Wolf, T.; Bloomfield, D.; Finson, M. L.; Pugh, E. R. & Wray, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of induced unimolecular decomposition for development of visible chemical lasers. Quarterly progress report, 1 November 1976--31 January 1977

Description: Progress during the third quarterly period of the subject contract is summarized. The logic developed in previous quarterly reports for studying the kinetics and spectroscopy of chemiluminescent azide radical reactions is summarized. The apparatus built for these studies is described. Preliminary observations of NO gamma-band emission produced from the reaction of oxygen atoms with products of thermally decomposed sodium azide are taken as an indication that azide radicals are being produced in the thermal decomposition source. Additional observations are underway and future plans are discussed.
Date: February 1, 1977
Creator: Piper, L G & Taylor, R L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of induced unimolecular decomposition for development of visible chemical lasers. Final report, 1 May 1976--30 April 1977

Description: This report summarizes the results of a study of azide decomposition for possible application in a visible chemical laser. Task 1 of the subject contract involved thorough review of the chemical literature pertaining to azide decomposition. Covalently bonded azides decompose directly into an electronically excited nitrene (RN) and ground-state molecular nitrogen. Ionic azides decompose to metal atoms and azide radicals. The azide radicals subsequently recombine to form electronically excited nitrogen molecules. Task 2, the experimental phase of this program, involved the study of azide-radical reactions. A flow reactor was built in which large concentrations (up to 10/sup 13/ molec cm/sup -3/) of N/sub 3/ could be produced from the thermal decomposition of NaN/sub 3/. The kinetics of and chemiluminescent products from several reactions of N/sub 3/ have been studied, and a method for obtaining absolute concentrations of N/sub 3/ is described. The potential utility of azide decomposition for the production of excited electronic states suitable for a laser device and further areas of research germane to this goal are discussed briefly.
Date: May 1, 1977
Creator: Piper, L G & Taylor, R L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthetic fuel combustion: pollutant formation. Soot initiation mechanisms in burning aromatics. First quarterly report, 19 September-31 December 1980

Description: Although considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding the phenomenology of soot formation in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels, relatively little attention has been focused upon aromatic fuels of the types commonly found in coal liquids. In particular, the effects of gas-phase free radicals, formed during combustion, on the kinetics of formation of incipient soot particles have not been characterized. Accordingly, an experimental investigation of the detailed kinetics of incipient soot formation in the combustion and pyrolysis of aromatic fuels of the benzene, anisole, phenol, and pyrrole families has been initiated in order to determine soot formation mechanisms and rate parameters. The experiments will be performed in a shock tube over the temperature range 1300 to 2500 K, using multiple ultraviolet, visible, and infrared diagnostics to monitor the kinetic behavior of free radicals (such as OH), incipient soot particles, and combustion products. Experiments will be conducted with artificially enhanced concentrations of free radicals such as OH and O to determine their effects on the kinetics of soot and soot precursors. The experimental work will be supported and directed by a parallel analytical effort using a detailed mechanistic model of the chemical kinetics and dynamics of the reacting systems. In this report, the design and configuration of the experimental apparatus are described, the details of the kinetic model are outlined, and possible reaction pathways are discussed.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Rawlins, W. T. & Tanzawa, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hot-gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells-dechlorination and soot formation. Final report, May 19, 1981-July 19, 1983

Description: Two separate aspects of hot-gas conditioning for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) were investigated under this contract: potential high temperature chloride sorbent materials were sreened and tested and carbon deposition on MCFC components was studied experimentally to determine guidelines for maximizing MCFC efficiency while avoiding carbon fouling. Natural minerals containing sodium carbonate were identified as the most promising candidates for economical removal of chlorides from coal gasifier effluents at temperatures of about 800 K (980/sup 0/F). The mineral Shortite was tested in a fixed bed and found to perform remarkably well with no calcination. Using Shortite we were able to achieve the program goal of less than 1 ppmV chlorides at 800 K. Shortite is an abundant mineral with no competing commercial demand, so it should provide an economical chloride cleanup sorbent. Measurements showed that carbon deposition can occur in the equilibrium carbon freee region because of the relative rates of the relevant reactions. On all surfaces tested, the Boudouard carbon formation reaction is much faster than the water-gas shift reaction which is much faster than the methanation reaction. This means that the normal practice of adding steam to prevent carbon formation will only succeed if flows are slow enough for the water shift reaction to go substantially to completion. More direct suppression of carbon formation can be achieved by CO/sub 2/ addition through anode recycle to force the Boudouard reaction backward. Addition of steam or CO/sub 2/ must be minimized to attain the highest possible MCFC efficiency. 28 references, 31 figures, 22 tables.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Ham, D.; Gelb, A.; Lord, G. & Simons, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of preignition on pulverized-coal combustion. Second quarterly report, 1 January 1981-31 March 1981. [Above 800K]

Description: The technical effort on pore structure optimization is complete. The basic conclusion is that particle size and porosity are the most important physical properties of char when considering char oxidation above 800K. The distribution of porosity with pore size is of secondary importance. The internal surface area and pore aspect ratio have no significant influence on char oxidation above 800K. The apparatus for the bench scale pore evolution experiments has been constructed. Coal samples will be heated at various rates to various final temperatures and the pore structure of the remaining char will be measured. Preliminary data have been analyzed using N/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ adsorption, Hg porosimetry and Hg and He densities. In future studies, the CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ adsorption will be omitted as they have not yielded any surprising empirical results and do not offer any information which is useful to the theory of a tailored pore structure for enhanced char reactivity. The Hg and He densities are important as they yield the char pososity and the Hg porosimetry is important as it yields the size distribution of the large pores which control char oxidation. Both the He pycnometer and Hg porosimeter have been purchased. All future experiments and char analyses will be performed in-house. The theory of pore evolution has been initiated. A statistical description of the pore tree has been developed.
Date: April 1, 1981
Creator: Simons, Girard A. & Kothandaraman, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Empirical systems model of the Westinghouse fluidized-bed PDU coal gasifier. Task report No. 1

Description: A systems-level model of the Westinghouse PDU coal gasifier has been constructed based entirely on the data gathered during testing of this gasifier. It represents a purely empirical attempt to correlate the published data by means of multiple linear regression analysis, leading to prediction equations for output variables as linear combinations of a number of input variables. The prediction equations so derived do not have any physical laws incorporated into them explicitly. They rely entirely on measurements of the physical processes going on in the gasifier-cyclone combination. However, the choice of relevant input variables was made with the help of some intuition about the variables which affect these physical processes, based on work performed at PSI to model coal gasifiers. It should also be noted that the data comes from engineering tests which were not necessarily designed to produce systematic variation of all variables, so the data may contain some biases about which variables are varied. The computer implementation of the model is very fast and simple. For each output variable a set of 11 coefficients are prescribed. To obtain a predicted value of that output variable, for a specified set of values of the 10 input variables, a linear combination (dot product) of the 10 input variables is formed, using the 11 coefficients. The use of this empirical model is restricted to predictions for the Westinghouse PDU coal gasifier (and associated cyclone) within the range of operating variables represented in the data base. In particular, all the data involve operation on Pittsburgh Seam Coal. However, there is a range of coal feed rates, and both air-blown and oxygen-blown runs were included.
Date: December 1, 1980
Creator: Kemp, N.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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