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Science To Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards

Description: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, nine in fiscal year 1998, seven in fiscal year 1999, and five in fiscal year 2000. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have published final reports. The 1997 and 1998 award projects have been completed or are nearing completion. Final reports for these awards will be published, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the 1999 and 2000 grants address significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. The 1999 and 2000 EMSP awards at PNNL are focused primarily in two areas: Tank Waste Remediation, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.
Date: June 19, 2001
Creator: Bredt, Paul R; Brockman, Fred J; Grate, Jay W; Hess, Nancy J; Meyer, Philip D; Murray, Christopher J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 mid-year progress report

Description: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

Description: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.
Date: July 25, 2000
Creator: Carlson, CD & Bennett, SQ
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

Description: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.
Date: June 30, 1999
Creator: Peurrung, L.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Screening analysis for EPACT-covered commercial HVAC and water-heating equipment

Description: EPCA requirements state that if the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) amends efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90.1-1989, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in amended Standard 90.1. However, DOE can establish higher efficiency levels if it can show through clear and convincing evidence that a higher efficiency level, that is technologically feasible and economically justified, would produce significant additional energy savings. On October 29, 1999, ASHRAE approved the amended Standard 90.1, which increases the minimum efficiency levels for some of the commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment covered by EPCA 92. DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential of the efficiency levels listed in Standard 90.1-1999. The analysis estimates the annual national energy consumption and the potential for energy savings that would result if the EPACT-covered products were required to meet these efficiency levels. The analysis also estimates additional energy-savings potential for the EPACT-covered products if they were to exceed the efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90-1-1999. In addition, a simple life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was performed for some alternative efficiency levels. This paper will describe the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis. The magnitude of HVAC and SWH loads imposed on equipment depends on the building's physical and operational characteristics and prevailing climatic conditions. To address this variation in energy use, coil loads for 7 representative building types at 11 climate locations were estimated based on a whole-building simulation.
Date: May 25, 2000
Creator: Somasundaram, S; Armstrong, PR; Belzer, DB; Gaines, SC; Hadley, DL; Katipumula, S et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from South Brother Island Channel, New York

Description: South Brother Island Channel was one of seven waterways that the US Army Crops of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal. Tests and analyses were conducted on South Brother Island Channel sediment core samples and evaluations were performed. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from South Brother Island Channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Souther Brother Island Channel were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. a composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particle phase of South Brother Island Channel sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. & Tokos, J.J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Effect of Fuel Assembly Loading Patterns on Thermal and Shielding Performance of a Spent Fuel Storage/Transportation Cask

Description: The licensing of spent fuel storage casks is generally based on conservative analyses that assume a storage system being uniformly loaded with design basis fuel. The design basis fuel typically assumes a maximum assembly enrichment, maximum burn up, and minimum cooling time. These conditions set the maximum decay heat loads and radioactive source terms for the design. Recognizing that reactor spent fuel pools hold spent fuel with an array of initial enrichments, burners, and cooling times, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of load pattern on peak cladding temperature and cask surface dose rate. Based on the analysis, the authors concluded that load patterns could be used to reduce peak cladding temperatures in a cask without adversely impacting the surface dose rates.
Date: November 20, 2001
Creator: Cuta, Judith M; Jenquin, Urban P & McKinnon, Mikal A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Elevated Tritium Levels in Groundwater Downgradient from the 618-11 Burial Ground Phase I Investigations

Description: This report describes the results of the preliminary investigation of elevated tritium in groundwater discovered near the 618-11 burial ground, located in the eastern part of the Hanford Site. Tritium in one well downgradient of the burial ground was detected at levels up to 8,140,000 pCi/L. The 618-11 burial ground received a variety of radioactive waste from the 300 Area between 1962 and 1967. The burial ground covers 3.5 hectare (8.6 acre) and contains trenches, large diameter caissons, and vertical pipe storage units. The burial ground was stabilized with a native sediment covering. The Energy Northwest reactor complex was constructed immediately east of the burial ground.
Date: May 1, 2000
Creator: Dresel, P.E.; Smith, R.M.; Williams, B.A.; Thompson, C.J.; Evans, J.C. & Hulstrom, L.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase A: Small-Scale Testing at ITT Flygt

Description: The key findings of the small-scale Flygt mixer tests are provided in this section. Some of these findings may not apply in larger tanks, so these data must be applied carefully when making predictions for large tanks. Flygt mixer testing in larger tanks at PNNL and in a full-scale tank at the SRS will be used to determine the applicability of these findings. The principal objectives of the small-scale Flygt mixer tests were to measure the critical fluid velocities required for sludge mobilization and particle suspension, to evaluate the applicability of the Gladki (1997) method for predicting required mixer thrust, and to provide small-scale test results for comparison with larger-scale tests to observe the effects of scale-up. The tank profile and mixer orientation (i.e., stationary, horizontal mixers) were in the same configuration as the prototype system, however, available resources did not allow geometric, kinematic, and dynamic similitude to be achieved. The results of these tests will be used in conjunction with the results from similar tests using larger tanks and mixers (tank diameters of 1.8 and 5.7 m [Powell et al. 1999]) to evaluate the effects of scaling and to aid in developing a methodology for predicting performance at full scale.
Date: March 30, 1999
Creator: Powell, M.R.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Poirier, M.R. & Rodwell, P.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase B: Mid-Scale Testing at PNNL

Description: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed mixer tests using 3-kW (4-hp) Flygt mixers in 1.8- and 5.7-m-diameter tanks at the 336 building facility in Richland, Washington to evaluate candidate scaling relationships for Flygt mixers used for sludge mobilization and particle suspension. These tests constituted the second phase of a three-phase test program involving representatives from ITT Flygt Corporation, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNNL. The results of the first phase of tests, which were conducted at ITT Flygt's facility in a 0.45-m-diameter tank, are documented in Powell et al. (1999). Although some of the Phase B tests were geometrically similar to selected Phase A tests (0.45-m tank), none of the Phase B tests were geometrically, cinematically, and/or dynamically similar to the planned Tank 19 mixing system. Therefore, the mixing observed during the Phase B tests is not directly indicative of the mixing expected in Tank 19 and some extrapolation of the data is required to make predictions for Tank 19 mixing. Of particular concern is the size of the mixer propellers used for the 5.7-m tank tests. These propellers were more than three times larger than required by geometric scaling of the Tank 19 mixers. The implications of the lack of geometric similarity, as well as other factors that complicate interpretation of the test results, are discussed in Section 5.4.
Date: March 30, 1999
Creator: Powell, M.R.; Combs, W.H.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Johnson, M.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2001

Description: Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the HSN, there were 477 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY ) 2001. The peak of the activity occurred over December 12th, 13th, and 14th when 35 events occurred. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the first quarter of FY 2001.
Date: February 27, 2001
Creator: Hartshorn, Donald C; Reidel, Steve; Rohay, Alan C & Valenta, Michelle Melody
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site Annual Treatability Studies Report: Calendar Year 2000

Description: This report provides information required to be reported annually by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-071 (3)(r)(ii)(F) and (3)(s)(ix) on the treatability studies conducted on the Hanford Site in 2000. These studies were conducted as required by WAC 173-303-071, ?Excluded Categories of Waste,? sections (3)(r) and (s). Unless otherwise noted, the waste samples were provided by and the treatability studies were performed for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identification number for these studies is WA7890008967.
Date: February 14, 2001
Creator: McCoy, Michael W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report

Description: This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.
Date: September 21, 1999
Creator: Dirkes, R. L.; Hanf, R. W. & Poston, T. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site climatological data summary 1995 with historical data

Description: This document presents the climatological data measured at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site for calendar year 1995. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995); however, Appendix B--Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1995 was warmer than normal, averaging 54.7 F, 1.4 F above normal (53.3 F). For the 12-month period, 8 months were warmer than normal, and 4 were cooler than normal. 1995 was the wettest year on record. Precipitation totaled 12.31 in., 197% of normal (6.26 in.); snowfall totaled 7.7 in., compared to the normal of 13.8 in. The average wind speed during 1995 was 7.8 mph, 0.1 mph above normal (7.7 mph). The peak gust during the year was 61 mph from the south-southwest on December 12. There were 27 days with peak gusts {ge} 40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Hoitink, D.J. & Burk, K.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site Climatological Data Summary 1998

Description: This document presents the climatological data measured at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site for calendar year 1998. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature; precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998); however, Appendix B--Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1998 was much warmer than normal, tying 1992 as the warmest year on record. The average temperature was 56.4 F, 3.1 F above normal (53.3 F). The highest July temperature ever recorded was 112 F on July 27, 1998. The first week in May, three daily temperature records were broken or tied. November 1998 was the third warmest on record. For the year 1998, there were 73 days with maximum temperature >90 F, the third highest on record. For the 12-month period, 11 months were warmer than normal and 1 was cooler than normal. The summer (June, July, and August) and autumn (September, October, and November) of 1998 were the fourth warmest on record. 1998 was slightly wetter than normal. Precipitation totaled 6.45 in., 103% of normal (6.26 in.); snow-fall totaled 7.2 in., compared to the normal of 13.8 in. There were eight thunderstorms recorded at Hanford Meteorological Station in July 1998, tying 1983 for the most thunderstorms in July. The average wind speed during 1998 was 7.9 mph, 0.2 mph above normal (7.7 mph). There were 32 days with peak gusts {ge}40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26 mph. The peak gust during the year was 56 mph from the south-southwest on November 21. November 1998 had a record number ...
Date: May 26, 1999
Creator: Hoitink, DJ; Ramsdell, JV & Burk, KW
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Site climatological data summary 1999 with historical data

Description: This document presents the climatological data measured at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site for calendar year 1999. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink et al. (1999), and Hoitink and Burk (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998); however, Appendix B-Wind Climatology (1994) is excluded. 1999 was warmer than normal at the Hanford Meteorology Station with an average temperature of 54.4 F, 1.1 F above normal (53.3 F). The hottest temperature was 105 F on July 28, while the coldest was 18 F on January 3. The maximum temperature of 64 F on August 30 was the lowest maximum temperature ever recorded in August, while the maximum temperature of 76 F on November 13 was the highest maximum temperature ever recorded in November. For the 12-month period, 6 months were warmer than normal and 6 were cooler than normal. 1999 was the fourth driest year on record. Precipitation totaled 3.75 inches, 60% of normal (6.26 inches); snowfall totaled 0.6 inch, the least calendar year snowfall on record (compared to the normal of 13.8 inches). 1999 was the windiest year on record with an average wind speed of 8.8 mph, 1.1 mph above normal (7.7 mph). There were 48 days with peak gust {ge} 40 mph, compared to a yearly average of 26 mph. The peak gust during the year was 65 mph on February 6. The heating-degree days for 1998--1999 were 4,802 (8% below the 5,231 normal). Cooling-degree days for 1999 were 891 (10% below the 994 normal).
Date: May 11, 2000
Creator: Hoitink, DJ; Burk, KW & Ramsdell, JV
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microsoft SQL Server 6.0{reg_sign} Workbook

Description: This workbook was prepared for introductory training in the use of Microsoft SQL Server Version 6.0. The examples are all taken from the PUBS database that Microsoft distributes for training purposes or from the Microsoft Online Documentation. The merits of the relational database are presented.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Augustenborg, E.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling water retention of sludge simulants and actual saltcake tank wastes

Description: The Ferrocyanide Tanks Safety Program managed by Westinghouse hanford Company has been concerned with the potential combustion hazard of dry tank wastes containing ferrocyanide chemical in combination with nitrate salts. Pervious studies have shown that tank waste containing greater than 20 percent of weight as water could not be accidentally ignited. Moreover, a sustained combustion could not be propagated in such a wet waste even if it contained enough ferrocyanide to burn. Because moisture content is a key critical factor determining the safety of ferrocyanide-containing tank wastes, physical modeling was performed by Pacific Northwest National laboratory to evaluate the moisture-retaining behavior of typical tank wastes. The physical modeling reported here has quantified the mechanisms by which two main types of tank waste, sludge and saltcake, retain moisture in a tank profile under static conditions. Static conditions usually prevail after a tank profile has been stabilized by pumping out any excess interstitial liquid, which is not naturally retained by the waste as a result of physical forces such as capillarity.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Simmons, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Noble Metals and Spinel Settling in High Level Waste Glass Melters

Description: In the continuing effort to support the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the noble metals issue is addressed. There is an additional concern about the amount of noble metals expected to be present in the future batches that will be considered for vitrification in the DWPF. Several laboratory, as well as melter-scale, studies have been completed by various organizations (mainly PNNL, SRTC, and WVDP in the USA). This letter report statuses the noble metals issue and focuses at the settling of noble metals in melters.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Sundaram, S Kamakshi & Perez Jr, Joseph M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International nuclear waste management fact book

Description: The International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled to provide current data on fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US; four multinational agencies; and 20 nuclear societies. This document, which is in its second year of publication supersedes the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 12 years. The content has been updated to reflect current information. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries--a section for each country that summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies--a section for each of the international agencies that has significant fuel cycle involvement and a list of nuclear societies. Glossary--a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, and technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country and some general information that is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the US.
Date: November 1995
Creator: Abrahms, C. W.; Patridge, M. D. & Widrig, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

Description: This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J. & Roop, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanics of Bubbles in Sludges and Slurries

Description: The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks that are known to retain and release bubbles composed of flammable gases. Characterizing and understanding the behavior of these bubbles is important for the safety issues associated with the flammable gases for both ongoing waste storage and future waste-retrieval operations. The retained bubbles are known to respond to small barometric pressure changes, though in a complex manner with unusual hysteresis occurring in some tanks in the relationship between bubble volume and pressure, or V-P hysteresis. With careful analysis, information on the volume of retained gas and the interactions of the waste and the bubbles can be determined. The overall objective of this study is to create a better understanding of the mechanics of bubbles retained in high-level waste sludges and slurries. Significant advancements have been made in all the major areas of basic theoretical and experimental method development.
Date: December 31, 2001
Creator: Gauglitz, Phillip A; Terrones, Guillermo & Rossen, William R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Low and High Frequency Sound for Enhancing Fish Screening Facilities to Protect Outmigrating Salmonids.

Description: The need to provide passage and protective screens at irrigation diversions has always been a necessary part of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1984, 1987, 1994). From 1985 through 1990, fish protection facilities in large irrigation diversions throughout the Columbia Basin, especially in the Yakima Basin, were updated. After 1990, fish protection efforts turned to installation of new facilities on unscreened diversions and to repair and upgrade of older facilities. The screening program also includes funds to monitor and evaluate the facilities. The screen evaluations indicate they are an effective means for protecting juvenile fish larger than 40 mm in length. As state and federal agencies change screening criteria to protect smaller fish (e.g., bull trout fry), the physical barrier may not always be effective. Screen mesh small enough to protect fish may be vulnerable to frequent plugging. Gap tolerances on side and bottom seals may be difficult to install and maintain. Physical barrier screens can be enhanced with behavioral barriers that cause fish to avoid a hazard. Behavioral barriers may consist of sound generator, strobe lights, bubble curtains, or electrical barriers. State of Oregon House Bill 3112 states that "Standards and criteria shall address the overall level of protection necessary at a given water diversion and shall not favor one technology or technique over another." Additionally, it goes on to say, "Screening device means a fish screen or behavior barrier." Other Northwest states, in particular Washington, have taken a comprehensive program to install barriers at all unscreened diversions by 1999. Protecting all fish at all water withdrawals will probably require both physical and behavioral barriers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of using an underwater sound-generator as a behavioral barrier for possible use at fish diversion facilities. This study did not ...
Date: February 1998
Creator: Mueller, Robert P.; Neitzel, Duane A. & Mavros, William V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department