Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.
open access

Assessment of research and development (R and D) needs in ammonia safety and environmental control

Description: This report characterizes the ammonia industry operations, reviews current knowledge of ammonia release and subsequent impacts, summarizes the status of release prevention and control methods and identify research and development needs for safety and environmental control. Appendices include: accidental spills and human exposure; adiabatic mixing of liquid nitrogen and air; fire and explosion hazards; and environmental impact rating tables. (PSB)
Date: September 1, 1981
Creator: Brenchley, D.L.; Athey, G.F. & Bomelburg, H.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

INSPECT: a package of computer programs for planning and evaluating safeguards inspections

Description: As part of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, PNL has developed a package of computer programs, called INSPECT, that can be used in planning and evaluating safeguards inspections of various types of nuclear facilities. The programs are based on the statistical methods described in Part F of the IAEA Safeguards Technical Manual and can be used to calculate the variance components of the MUF (Material Unaccounted For) statistic, the variance components of the D (difference) statistic, attribute and variables sampling plans, and a measure of the effectiveness of the inspection plan. The paper describes the programs, reviews a number of applications, and indicates areas for future work.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Mullen, M.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

COMP: a BASIC language nonlinear least-squares curve fitting program

Description: COMP is an interactive nonlinear least squares routine written in BASIC language and used to obtain estimates of parameters in nonlinear functions and to approximate their associated statistical errors. The program uses the linearizing (or Taylor Series) expansion of partial derivatives outlined in Draper and Smith, (1966, pp. 267 to 270). Therefore, partial derivatives must be supplied (as well as the function) by the user for any new models not currently contained in the programs. When a linearizing method is used to estimate parameters in a nonlinear model, all the usual procedures of linear regression theory can be applied. However, the results so obtained are only valid insofar as the linearized form approximates the true model. All of the statistics computed by COMP should be viewed with this restriction in mind. The output of COMP includes the variance-covariance matrix, t-tests for parameters, Von Neumann's ratio, observed, predicted and residual values, the error mean square, and an optional procedure to evaluate heteroscedasticity.
Date: November 1, 1977
Creator: Thomas, J. M.; Cochran, M. I.; Watson, C. R. & Eberhardt, L. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Analysis of Paraho oil shale products and effluents: an example of the multi-technique approach

Description: Inorganic analysis of solid, liquid and gaseous samples from the Paraho Semiworks Retort was completed using a multitechnique approach. The data were statistically analyzed to determine both the precision of each method and to see how closely the various techniques compared. The data were also used to determine the redistribution of 31 trace and major elements in the various effluents, including the offgas for the Paraho Retort operating in the direct mode. The computed mass balances show that approximately 1% or greater fractions of the As, Co, Hg, N, Ni, S and Se are released during retorting and redistributed to the product shale oil, retort water or product offgas. The fraction for these seven elements ranged from almost 1% for Co and Ni to 50 to 60% for Hg and N. Approximately 20% of the S and 5% of the As and Se are released. The mass balance redistribution during retorting for Al, Fe, Mg, V and Zn was observed to be no greater than .05%. These redistribution figures are generally in agreement with previous mass balance studies made for a limited number of elements on laboratory or smaller scale pilot retorts. 7 tables.
Date: June 10, 1979
Creator: Fruchter, J. S.; Wilkerson, C. L.; Evans, J. C. & Sanders, R. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Review of tribological sinks in six major industries

Description: Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.
Date: September 1, 1985
Creator: Imhoff, C. H.; Brown, D. R.; Hane, G. J.; Hutchinson, R. A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ETRANS: an energy transport system optimization code for distributed networks of solar collectors

Description: The optimization code ETRANS was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to design and estimate the costs associated with energy transport systems for distributed fields of solar collectors. The code uses frequently cited layouts for dish and trough collectors and optimizes them on a section-by-section basis. The optimal section design is that combination of pipe diameter and insulation thickness that yields the minimum annualized system-resultant cost. Among the quantities included in the costing algorithm are (1) labor and materials costs associated with initial plant construction, (2) operating expenses due to daytime and nighttime heat losses, and (3) operating expenses due to pumping power requirements. Two preliminary series of simulations were conducted to exercise the code. The results indicate that transport system costs for both dish and trough collector fields increase with field size and receiver exit temperature. Furthermore, dish collector transport systems were found to be much more expensive to build and operate than trough transport systems. ETRANS itself is stable and fast-running and shows promise of being a highly effective tool for the analysis of distributed solar thermal systems.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Barnhart, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Pacific Northwest Laboratory, annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4. Physical sciences

Description: Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1983 to the Office of Energy Research, includes those programs funded under the title Physical and Technological Research. The Field Task Program Studies reports in this document are grouped under the subheadings and each section is introduced by a divider page that indicates the Field Task Agreement reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1983. The reader should contact the principal investigators named or examine the publications cited for more details.
Date: February 1, 1984
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Interactions of tailings leachate with local liner materials found at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

Description: The mill tailings site at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania is the first mill site to receive remedial action under the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Part of this remedial action will require excavating the 53,500 m/sup 3/ (70,000 yd/sup 3/) of tailings on the site having a specific activity exceeding 100 pCi/g, and encapsulating these contaminated tailings in a clay-lined cell. As part of the remedial action effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been studying the interactions of tailings and tailings leachate with locally occurring clays proposed for liner materials. These studies include physical and chemical characterization of amended and unamended local clays, chemical characterization of the tailings, column studies of tailings leached with deionized water, and column studies of clays contacted with tailings solutions to determine the attenuation properties of the proposed liner materials. Column studies of tailings leached with deionized water indicated that the Canonsburg tailings could represent a source of soluble radium-226 and uranium-238, several trace metals, cations, and the anions SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 3/, and Cl. Of these soluble contaminants, uranium-238, radium-226, the trace metals As and Mo, and the anions F and SO/sub 4/ were present at levels exceeding maximum concentration levels in the tailings leaching column effluents. However, local clays, both in amended and unamended form were effective in attenuating contaminant migration. The soil amendments tested failed to increase radium attenuation. The tailings leaching studies indicated that the tailings will produce leachates of neutral pH and relatively low contaminant levels for at least 200 years. We believe that compacting the tailings within the encapsulation cell will help to reduce leaching of contaminants from the liner system, since very low permeabilities (<10/sup -8/ cm/s) were observed for even slightly compacted tailings materials.
Date: April 1, 1984
Creator: Dodson, M.E.; Gee, G.W. & Serne, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Compressed air energy storage (CAES) environmental control concerns and program plan

Description: This report assesses the required environmental research and recommends a program plan to assist DOD's Environmental Control Technology Division (ECT) in performing its mission of ensuring that the procedures, processes, systems, and strategies necessary to minimize any adverse environmental impacts of compressed air energy storage (CAES) are developed in a timely manner so as not to delay implementation of the technology. To do so, CAES technology and the expected major environmental concerns of the technology are described. Second, ongoing or planned research in related programs and the applicability of results from these programs to CAES environmental research are discussed. Third, the additional research and development required to provide the necessary environmental data base and resolve concerns in CAES are outlined. Finally, a program plan to carry out this research and development effort is presented.
Date: June 1, 1980
Creator: Beckwith, M.A. & Boehm, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A Method for Determining Allowable Residual Contamination Levels of Radionuclide Mixtures in Soil

Description: An important consideration in the disposal of radioactive wastes, and consequently in the preparation of plans for remedial actions at contaminated sites, is the amount of radioactive contamination that may be allowed to remain at any particular waste site. The allowable residual contamination level (ARCL) is dependent on the radiation dose limit imposed, the physical and environmental characteristics of the waste site, and the time at which exposure to the wastes is assumed to occur. The steps in generating an ARCL are generally as follows: (1) develop plausible, credible site-specific exposure scenario; (2) calculate maximum annual radiation doses to an individual for each radionuclide based on the existing physical characteristics of the waste site and the site-specific exposure scenario; (3) calculate the ARCL for the dose limit desired, including all radionuclides present, uncorrected for site cleanup or barrier considerations; and (4) apply any corrections for proposed cleanup activity or addition of barriers to waste migration or uptake to obtain the ARCL applicable to the proposed action. Use of this method allows appropriate application of resources to achieve uniform compliance with a single regulatory standard, i.e., a radiation dose rate limit. Application and modification of the ARCL method requires appropriate models of the environmental transport and fate of radionuclides. Example calculations are given for several specific waste forms and waste site types in order to demonstrate the technique and generate comparisons with other approaches.
Date: May 1, 1982
Creator: Napier, B .A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Organic components of nuclear wastes and their potential for altering radionuclide distribution when released to soil

Description: Normal waste processing at the Hanford operations requires the use of many organic materials, chiefly in the form of complexing agents and diluents. These organic materials and their chemical and radiolytic degradation products, have potential for complexing fission products and transuranium elements, both in the waste streams and upon infiltration into soil, perhaps influencing future sorption or migration of the nuclides. Particular complexation characteristics of various nuclides which constitute the major fission products, long-lived isotopes, and the most mobile in radioactive wastes are discussed briefly with regards to their anticipated sorption or mobility in soils. Included in the discussion are Am, Sb, Ce, Cs, Co, Cm, Eu, I, Np, Pm, Pu, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, U, and Zr. 107 references.
Date: August 1, 1980
Creator: McFadden, K.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

TCT hybrid preconceptual blanket design studies

Description: The conceptual design of a tokamak fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor, which produces electric power and fissile material, has been performed in a cooperative effort between Princeton's Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). PPPL, who had overall project lead responsibility, designed the fusion driver system. Its core consists of a tokamak plasma maintained in the two-component torus (TCT) mode by both D and T beams and having a single null poloidal divertor. The blanket concept selected by PPPL consists of a neutron multiplying converter region, containing natural Uranium Molybdenum (U-Mo) slugs followed by a fuel burning blanket region of molten salt containing PuF/sub 3/. PNL analyzed this concept to determine its structural, thermal and hydraulic performance characteristics. An adequate first wall cooling method was determined, utilizing low pressure water in a double wall design. A conceptual layout of the converter region tubes was performed, providing adequate helium cooling and the desired movement of U-Mo slugs. A thermal hydraulic analysis of the power-producing blanket regions indicated that either more helium coolant tubes are needed or the salt must be circulated to obtain adequate heat removal capability.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Aase, D. T.; Bampton, M. C. C.; Doherty, T. J.; Leonard, B. R.; McCann, R. A.; Newman, D. F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

Description: This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Andrews, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

An Evaluation of liquid metal leak detection methods for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

Description: This report documents an independent review and evaluation of sodium leak detection methods described in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Only information in publicly available documents was used in making the assessments.
Date: December 1, 1977
Creator: Morris, C. J. & Doctor, S. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. A report on Tasks 1 and 2 of Phase I. [Shallow land burial]

Description: The purpose of the work reported here was to evaluate the relevance of biotic transport to the assessment of impacts and licensing of low-level waste disposal sites. Available computer models and their recent applications at low-level waste disposal sites are considered. Biotic transport mechanisms and processes for both terrestrial and aquatic systems are presented with examples from existing waste disposal sites. Following a proposed system for ranking radionuclides by their potential for biotic transport, recommendations for completing Phase I research are presented. To evaluate the long-term importance of biotic transport at low-level waste sites, scenarios for biotic pathways and mechanisms need to be developed. Scenarios should begin with a description of the waste form and should include a description of biotic processes and mechanisms, approximations of the magnitude of materials transported, and a linkage to processes or mechanisms in existing models. Once these scenarios are in place, existing models could be used to evaluate impacts resulting from biotic transport and to assess the relevance to site selection and licensing of low-level waste disposal sites.
Date: July 1, 1982
Creator: McKenzie, D. H.; Cadwell, L. L.; Cushing, C. E. Jr.; Harty, R.; Kennedy, W. E. Jr.; Simmons, M. A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Report on Fusion Energy Research, April 1977 - June 1977

Description: The development of economic data for fusion power plants continued in a study estimating the potential impact of a shortage of materials important in fusion plant construction. In studies developing heat transfer and fluid flow design tools for fusion reactor blankets, preconceptual design studies were initiated to identify the potential design limits of water cooling in the first wall of Tokamak Next Step (TNS) concepts. In surface effects research clean gold samples were irradiated in the University of California (D,Be) neutron source for a neutron sputtering experiment. Light ion and neutron irradiation experiments have continued in studies of the effects of radiation on mechanical properties. The hardening response of 14 MeV neutron-irradiated nickel changed at high particle fluences (10/sup 16/ to 10/sup 17/ particles/cm/sup 2/) while the hardening response of 16 MeV proton-irradiated nickel did not, which may have been due to a difference in irradiation hardening mechanisms. The flux dependence of the damage microstructure and irradiation hardening of materials needs further study to clarify uncertainty about light ion and fusion neutron damage processes. Neutron irradiations of Ni, 316SS, and Nb wires and foils were completed. Work has continued in studies developing acoustic emission (AE) techniques for determining the prebreakdown behavior and failure mechanisms in electric insulators with potential applications in fusion reactors. Scoping experiments with the high-vacuum dielectric breakdown apparatus were conducted.
Date: July 1, 1977
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Evaluation of models for developing biological input for the design and location of water-intake structures

Description: An approach for assessing multiple stimulus/response relations between fish and water intake structures is presented in this report. The approach stresses stimulus/response relations influencing fish and shellfish distribution and is made up of two methods. The first places emphasis on spatial and temperal distributions of populations; information is presented in the form of a non-predictive model, which allows for organizing information and documenting review processes. The second approach encompasses functional relationships between environmental and biological stimuli and responses of organisms. By using the two methods together, functional relationships can be evaluated to define the distribution of a fish or shellfish species. This information can then be used to resolve questions relating to impingement and entrainment.
Date: December 1, 1981
Creator: Simmons, M. A. & McKenzie, D. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

COBRA-WC: a version of COBRA for single-phase multiassembly thermal hydraulic transient analysis. [LMFBR]

Description: The objective of this report is to provide the user of the COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code a basic understanding of the code operation and capabilities. Included in this manual are the equations solved and the assumptions made in their derivations, a general description of the code capabilities, an explanation of the numerical algorithms used to solve the equations, and input instructions for using the code. Also, the auxiliary programs GEOM and SPECSET are described and input instructions for each are given. Input for COBRA-WC sample problems and the corresponding output are given in the appendices. The COBRA-WC code has been developed from the COBRA-IV-I code to analyze liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) assembly transients. It was specifically developed to analyze a core flow coastdown to natural circulation cooling.
Date: July 1, 1980
Creator: George, T. L.; Basehore, K. L.; Wheeler, C. L.; Prather, W. A. & Masterson, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Back to Top of Screen