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Engineering and economic evaluation of direct hot-water geothermal energy applications on the University of New Mexico campus. Final technical report

Description: The potential engineering and economic feasibility of low-temperature geothermal energy applications on the campus of the University of New Mexico is studied in detail. This report includes three phases of work: data acquisition and evaluation, system synthesis, and system refinement and implementation. Detailed process designs are presented for a system using 190/sup 0/F geothermal water to substitute for the use of 135 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/y (141 TJ/y) of fossil fuels to provide space and domestic hot water heating for approximately 23% of the campus. Specific areas covered in the report include economic evaluation, environmental impact and program implementation plans.
Date: December 31, 1980
Creator: Kauffman, D. & Houghton, A.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New multigroup Monte Carlo scattering algorithm suitable for neutral- and charged-particle Boltzmann and Fokker-Planck calculations

Description: Morel (1981) has developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates transport codes for performing charged-particle Fokker-Planck calculations in one-dimensional slab and spherical geometries. Since the Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MORSE, uses the same multigroup cross section data that discrete ordinates codes use, it was natural to consider whether Fokker-Planck calculations could be performed with MORSE. In order to extend the unique three-dimensional forward or adjoint capability of MORSE to Fokker-Planck calculations, the MORSE code was modified to correctly treat the delta-function scattering of the energy operator, and a new set of physically acceptable cross sections was derived to model the angular operator. Morel (1979) has also developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates codes for performing electron Boltzmann calculations. These electron cross sections may be treated in MORSE with the same methods developed to treat the Fokker-Planck cross sections. The large magnitude of the elastic scattering cross section, however, severely increases the computation or run time. It is well-known that approximate elastic cross sections are easily obtained by applying the extended transport (or delta function) correction to the Legendre coefficients of the exact cross section. An exact method for performing the extended transport cross section correction produces cross sections which are physically acceptable. Sample calculations using electron cross sections have demonstrated this new technique to be very effective in decreasing the large magnitude of the cross sections.
Date: May 1, 1983
Creator: Sloan, D.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Net-energy analysis of a retrofit geothermal-heating system

Description: A net energy analysis was carried out as part of a study of the potential engineering and economic feasibility for geothermal heating of the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. The geothermal system design included production and disposal wells, surface facilities and retrofitting of eighteen existing buildings. For a 30-year project life, the net energy ratio was found to be about 7.1.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Kauffman, D.; Houghton, A.V. & Kuo, W.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of geothermal potential of Rio Grande rift and Basin and Range province, New Mexico. Final technical report, January 1, 1977-May 31, 1978

Description: A study was made of the geological, geochemical and geophysical characteristics of potential geothermal areas in the Rio Grande rift and Basin and Range province of New Mexico. Both regional and site-specific information is presented. Data was collected by: (1) reconnaissance and detailed geologic mapping, emphasizing Neogene stratigraphy and structure; (2) petrologic studies of Neogene igneous rocks; (3) radiometric age-dating; (4) geochemical surveying, including regional and site-specific water chemistry, stable isotopic analyses of thermal waters, whole-rock and mineral isotopic studies, and whole-rock chemical analyses; and (5) detailed geophysical surveys, using electrical, gravity and magnetic techniques, with electrical resistivity playing a major role. Regional geochemical water studies were conducted for the whole state. Integrated site-specific studies included the Animas Valley, Las Cruces area (Radium Springs and Las Alturas Estates), Truth or Consequences region, the Albuquerque basin, the San Ysidro area, and the Abiquiu-Ojo Caliente region. The Animas Valley and Las Cruces areas have the most significant geothermal potential of the areas studied. The Truth or Consequences and Albuquerque areas need further study. The San Ysidro and Abiquiu-Ojo Caliente regions have less significant geothermal potential. 78 figs., 16 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1985
Creator: Callender, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of the geothermal resource in the area of Albuquerque, New Mexico

Description: Factors indicating a potential geothermal resource near Albuquerque are: (1) nearby volcanoes active as recently as 120,000 years ago, (2) gravity interpretation indicating a potential reservoir averaging 1.5 km thickness, (3) high heat flow near the city, (4) warm waters (>30/sup 0/C) in municipal wells, (5) recent seismicity indicating active faulting, thereby, allowing the possibility of deep hydrothermal circulation, (6) high shallow (<30 m) temperature gradients (>100/sup 0/C/km) discovered in our drillholes, (7) deeper (<500 m) gradients from water wells exceeding 80/sup 0/C/km, and (8) chemical analyses of 88 groundwater samples yielding estimated base reservoir temperatures as high as 190/sup 0/C. An area of elevated shallow temperature gradients (less than or equal to 140/sup 0/C/km) was discovered a few kilometers west of Albuquerque by our 69 hole drilling program. Resistivity, magnetic, and gravity measurements combined with computer modeling suggests that heated ground water is forced closer to the surface here by flow over a buried ridge. A well drilled nearby yielded the highest recorded temperature in the Albuquerque area at its maximum depth (32.8/sup 0/C at 364 m). The deep gradient is 35/sup 0/C/km. An oil test well close by reported large volumes of water at 1 km; therefore, the possibility of a low temperature (>50/sup 0/C) geothermal resource exists west of Albuquerque at less than 1 km depth.
Date: July 1, 1983
Creator: Jiracek, G.R.; Swanberg, C.A.; Morgan, P. & Parker, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Variable speed constant frequency constant voltage alternator. Annual report

Description: A test alternator is operated with digital control of its output frequency for variable shaft speed. The machine is a two-pole alternator with power removed through slip rings. The output frequency of the alternator is controlled by rotating the field by stepping through sixteen coils around the rotor. Usually four coils are active at one time. The rotating field in the stationary coils of the stator is controlled by microcircuits. The control circuits are constructed with available low-cost, low-power integrated circuits (ICs). The test results from the first test alternator indicate the feasibility of using this type of alternator to convert available wind power directly to usable 60 hertz power.
Date: July 1, 1980
Creator: Grannemann, W.W.; Yang, C.E. & Seo, P.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium deposits of the Grants, New Mexico mineral belt (II). [Genesis]

Description: This is part of a study of the genesis of the U deposits of the Grants mineral belt. Enrichment of Mg in ore zones is frequently observed, with chlorite being a common product. Clay mineralogic studies argue for chlorite-illite-montmorillonite associations with ores. The methods include scanning electron microscopy, Eh-pH diagrams, activation analysis, and rare earth element studies. (DLC)
Date: July 1, 1979
Creator: Brookins, D.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic modeling of electricity production from hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs: methodology and analyses. Final report

Description: An analytical methodology is developed for assessing alternative modes of generating electricity from hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy sources. The methodology is used in sensitivity analyses to explore relative system economics. The methodology used a computerized, intertemporal optimization model to determine the profit-maximizing design and management of a unified HDR electric power plant with a given set of geologic, engineering, and financial conditions. By iterating this model on price, a levelized busbar cost of electricity is established. By varying the conditions of development, the sensitivity of both optimal management and busbar cost to these conditions are explored. A plausible set of reference case parameters is established at the outset of the sensitivity analyses. This reference case links a multiple-fracture reservoir system to an organic, binary-fluid conversion cycle. A levelized busbar cost of 43.2 mills/kWh ($1978) was determined for the reference case, which had an assumed geothermal gradient of 40/sup 0/C/km, a design well-flow rate of 75 kg/s, an effective heat transfer area per pair of wells of 1.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 2/, and plant design temperature of 160/sup 0/C. Variations in the presumed geothermal gradient, size of the reservoir, drilling costs, real rates of return, and other system parameters yield minimum busbar costs between -40% and +76% of the reference case busbar cost.
Date: September 1, 1979
Creator: Cummings, R.G. & Morris, G.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Benefit-cost framework for analysis of trace element emissions from coal-fired power plants. [103 references]

Description: The major conclusions of this report may be summarized in the following four points: (1) It is probable that atmospheric emissions of trace elements from Southwestern coal-fired power plants will not cause major problems over the next 20 years. But monitoring for trace element build-up (especially mercury, selenium, and arsenic) in the mountains of southern Colorado, Navajo Reservoir, and other local hot spots would be an important and desirable step. (2) It appears that damage from trace elements in disposed ash is more likely than damage from atmospheric trace element emissions. But whether damage from disposed ash will actually occur is highly uncertain. We recommend that additional research be conducted on the entire range of issues surrounding ash disposal. (3) In the area of legislation and regulation, there may be some need for review of regulations concerning trace element atmospheric emissions. Present regulation of ash disposal is very likely to need revision and extension. (4) Future research on the environmental problems of coal-fired power plants should place emphasis on atmospheric emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides; consequent problems of acid precipitation also need exploration. Environmental research on coal-fired power plants does not need to exclude other problems. But issues surrounding sulfur emissions, nitrogen emissions, sulfate transformations, and acid precipitation appear to merit major emphasis. Perhaps the most important aspect of the preceding list of conclusions is that more questions are raised than are answered. As work on the subject proceeded, it became apparent that an important task was to point future research in the right direction.
Date: November 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photoassisted electrolysis applied to coal gasification. Third quarterly report, 1 January 1982-31 Mar 1982

Description: The literature search on electrochemical studies of various carbons has been completed. Two conclusions were reached: (1) The surfaces of various carbons are covered by oxide films to different extents and the oxides resemble either the quinone-like structure in their oxidized form or the hydroquinone-like structure in the reduced form. (2) When carbonaceous materials are oxidized chemically, electrochemically, or thermally, the first stage involves formation of the oxide film and the later stages oxide gas (CO or CO/sub 2/) evolution. The catalytic reaction mechanism of coal oxidation was substantiated by adding Fe/sup 3 +/ or Ce/sup 4 +/ to a cell containing a coal slurry without passing any electrical current and by monitoring the amount of CO/sub 2/ evolved. Also, studies were performed on current efficiencies of CO/sub 2/ production reaction as a function of the particle size of coal samples. Finally, the catalytic rate constants of various redox catalysts for the coal oxidation reaction are reported. These results indicate that the thermodynamics of the reaction systems play a predominant role in determining the rate constants. Methods of studying the stability of semiconductor electrodes were established employing rotating ring-disk electrode techniques. The long-term stability of semiconductor electrodes would be needed to carry out the photoassisted coal gasification reaction. In the method we developed, the semiconductor was used as a disk electrode while the noble metal, e.g., Au or Pt, is used as a ring electrode. The species generated at the semiconductor electrode by light illumination is detected at the ring electrode by applying the proper electrode potential. If the ring detection current is lower than its expected value, the disk may undergo the photocorrosion reaction.
Date: January 1, 1982
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration salt gradient solar pond. Fourth semiannual progress report, November 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

Description: A thorough account is given of a solar pond study underway at the University of New Mexico since 1975. This report consists of the Ph.D. dissertation of Federica Zangrando entitled Observation and Analysis of a Full-Scale Experimental Salt Gradient Solar Pond. The stability condition for a non-constant gradient, doubly-diffusive system is derived and a prescription for the routine detection of potential instabilities is presented. Techniques for handling unstable regions are described. Conclusions so far strongly support the viability of the solar pond concept. Salt gradient ponds appear to have a very definite niche in the ecology of energy production.
Date: July 10, 1979
Creator: Zangrando, F. & Bryant, H.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grid-controlled metal ion sources for heavy ion fusion accelerators

Description: A variety of metal ions can be generated using vacuum arcs, but due to the nature of these arcs, the flux generated fluctuates in time. We have successfully employed electrostatically biased grids to control the plasma and to provide a well-behaved, space charge limited ion source. The grid prevents the plasma from entering the extraction gap before the main voltage pulse is applied. The extracted ion current is space charge limited, resulting in a constant output current even though the ion flux from the vacuum arc source varies considerably. There are several advantages over other conventional sources, for instance, thermionic sources are faced with heating problems especially for large area configurations, while gas-injection sources cause prefill problems because they take too long to reach equilibrium. We have performed extraction experiments with aluminium and indium arc sources. We have extracted 300 mA of pure Al/sup +/ at 30 kV for 10 ..mu..s. The normalized beam emittance has been measured to be 8 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ ..pi..-m-rad. 3 refs., 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Len, L.K.; Humphries, S. Jr. & Burkart, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1979 New Mexico legislative session: energy issues and legislation. [WIPP]

Description: This report is an account of the energy legislation and associated issues considered during the 1979 session of the 34th New Mexico Legislature. The session's major issue was the federal study of a proposed nuclear Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. A large proportion of time and effort was spent on resolving the state's formal position toward the federal project. However, other energy concerns were also significant even though they were neither as controversial nor as visible as the primary issue. The two most important laws enacted were the Radioactive Waste Consultation Act and the Radioactive Waste Transportation Act. The Legislature considered 47 other energy-related bills, of which 17 were enacted.
Date: October 1, 1979
Creator: Barsumian, L. & Vandevender, S.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of annealed and metamict pyrochlore minerals by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. [Synthetic pyrochlores with general formula (RE)/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/, RE = Er, Y/sub 2/, Gd/sub 2/, Dy, La]

Description: Materials of the pyrochlore structure type exhibit a variety of interesting properties including phases capable of acting as hosts for actinides in radioactive wastes. Studies of curium doped gadolinium titanate phases (Gd/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/) have been made which showed that the radiation damage ingrowth followed an exponential relationship. For the study reported here a series of synthetic pyrochlores were produced having the titanate phase with the general formula (RE)/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/, RE = Er, Y/sub 2/, Gd/sub 2/, Dy, La. Additionally a set of metamict (radiation damaged) pyrochlores was examined in both a natural and post temperature annealed state. Experiments were conducted on these samples using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) techniques. In summary, these studies show that in pyrochlore structure types the Ti-O cage undergoes changes due to radiation damage. The individual Ti-O bonds become more disordered which leads to a loss of short and long range order and, ultimately, to expansion of the bulk material. 2 refs., 2 figs.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Greegor, R.B.; Lytle, F.W.; Ewing, R.C.; Chakoumakos, B.C. & Lumpkin, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

Description: This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: El-Genk, M.S. & Hoover, M.D. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhanced heat extraction from hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs due to interacting secondary thermal cracks. Final report

Description: How the fluid circulating through the main hydraulic fracture and the thermally-induced secondary, growing, interacting cracks affects the time-varying temperature, deformations, stresses, thermal crack geometry, water flow rates through the main and thermal cracks, reservoir coolant outlet temperature, and reservoir thermal power of the cracked geothermal reservoir is investigated. First, a simplified version of the proposed hot-dry-rock reservoir is considered. A closed-form solution of the rock temperature without thermal crack was found and substituted into SAP-IV computer code to calculate the stresses. These stresses being superposed with earth stresses and fluid pressure were used in conjunction with the fracture mechanics criterion to determine the initiation of secondary thermal crack. After the initiation of secondary thermal crack, the rock temperature was then calculated by a two-dimensional heat conduction program AYER. The detailed procedures for carrying out these steps are listed. Solutions developed are applied to studying the time-varying temperature field, thermal stresses and crack geometry produced, and additional heat power generated in the reservoir. Conclusions were discussed and summarized. (MHR)
Date: April 1, 1979
Creator: Hsu, Y.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

Description: This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: El-Genk, M.S. & Hoover, M.D. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Survey of Indian issues in the state of New Mexico relating to uranium mining and milling

Description: (Estimates of Indian uranium resources range from 11 to 50% of the US total resources. About 17% of New Mexico's reserves are known to be on Indian lands. New Mexico has produced almost half of the nation's uranium supply; over half of the known reserves are located within the state. However, the state has virtually no jurisdiction over development of Indian uranium. As a result, economic and environmental impacts on the state are beyond its control. The lack of state and federal control over these impacts is influencing how the Indians federal control over these impacts is influencing how the Indians allow development to proceed. The impacts of Indian uranium development also influence state control of non-Indian uranium development also influence state control of non-Indian reserves. To the extent that these controls affect the availability of uranium concentrate, DOE needs to understand the issues involved. This issue paper identifies some of the related problems for both the Indians and the state and explores the reasons behind them.
Date: November 1, 1979
Creator: Vandevender, S.G.; Barsumian, L. & Gurbaxani, S.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Extrapolation of nuclear waste glass aging

Description: Increased confidence is provided to the extrapolation of long-term waste form behavior by comparing the alteration of experimentally aged natural basaltic glass to the condition of the same glass as it has been geologically aged. The similarity between the laboratory and geologic alterations indicates that important aging variables have been identified and incorporated into the laboratory experiments. This provides credibility to the long-term predictions made for waste form borosilicate glasses using similar experimental procedures. In addition, these experiments have demonstrated that the aging processes for natural basaltic glass are relevant to the alteration of nuclear waste glasses, as both appear to react via similar processes. The alteration of a synthetic basaltic glass was measured in MCC-1 tests done at 90/sup 0/C, a SA/V of 0.1 cm/sup -1/ and time periods up to 182 days. Tests were also done using (1) MCC-2 procedures at 190/sup 0/C, a SA/V of 0.1 cm/sup -1/ and time periods up to 91 days and (2) hydration tests in saturated water vapor at 240/sup 0/C, a SA/V of approx. 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -1/, and time periods up to 63 days. These results are compared to alteration observed in natural basaltic glasses of great age. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Byers, C.D.; Ewing, R.C.; Jercinovic, M.J. & Keil, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Basalt glass: an analogue for the evaluation of the long-term stability of nuclear waste form borosilicate glasses

Description: The long-term stability of nuclear waste form borosilicate glasses can be evaluated by understanding the processes that effect the long-term alteration of glass and by comparing laboratory alteration of synthetic basalt and borosilicate glasses with the observed stability of naturally occurring basaltic glasses in diverse geologic environments. This paper presents detailed electron microprobe analyses of naturally altered basaltic glasses (with maximum ages of 10,000 to 20 million years) from low-temperature environments. These results are compared to laboratory data on the corrosion of a synthetic basaltic glass in MCC-1 tests (90/sup 0/C, a SA/V of 0.1 cm/sup -1/ and time periods up to 182 days), MCC-2 tests (190/sup 0/C, a SA/V of 0.1 cm/sup -1/ and time periods up to 210 days) and hydration tests in saturated water vapor (240/sup 0/C, an estimated SA/V of approx. 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -1/ and time periods up to 63 days). Additionally, laboratory-induced hydration alteration of synthetic basalt and borosilicate glasses is compared. These preliminary experiments provide evidence that the alteration processes observed for natural basalt glasses are relevant to understanding the alteration of nuclear waste glass, as both appear to react via similar processes. 12 references, 6 figures, 1 table.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Byers, C.D.; Jercinovic, M.J.; Ewing, R.C. & Keil, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conservatism in least favorable response analysis and testing

Description: In order to assure that mechanical structures can meet design requirements it is desirable to test a structure using an input which is conservative but not a severe overtest. One method available for the specification of shock tests is the method of least favorable response. This method can be used analytically or in the laboratory and is guaranteed to provide tests which are conservative, at least in one sense. When the impulse response function, or equivalently the frequency response function, is available between a point of interest on a structure and the input point of the structure, and when we know the real function which envelops the modulus of the Fourier transform of all possible inputs which might excite the structure, then the method of least favorable response can be used to find an upper bound on the response which the point of interest on the structure can realize. We use this in the analysis of structural peak response. In the laboratory the least favorable response is generated experimentally, for example, by testing the structural unit on a shake table. If the structure survives the laboratory test, then we assume that it could survive any input in the class of inputs whose Fourier transform moduli are enveloped by the function used in the analysis. The objective of this study was to analyze the inherent conservatism of the method of least favorable response. A technique that can be used to do this is demonstrated. First, the method of least favorable response is reviewed and how it is used analytically and experimentally is demonstrated. Next the technique used to measure the conservatism in a least favorable response test is developed. Finally, the method is applied in some numerical examples where the degree of conservatism in the tests of some specific structures is ...
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Paez, T.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of heat and mass transfer in sub-seabed disposal of nuclear waste

Description: A mathematical basis is developed for the prediction of thermal and radionuclide transport in marine sediments. The theory is applied to the study of radioactive waste disposal by emplacement, in specially designed containers, well below the sediment/water interface. Numerical results are obtained for a specified model problem through use of two computer programs designed primarily for the analysis of waste disposal problems. One program (MARIAH) provides descriptions of the temperature and velocity fields induced by the presence of a container of thermally active nuclear waste. A second program (IONMIG), which utilizes the results of the thermal analysis, is used to provide predictions for the migration of four representative radionuclides: /sup 239/Pu, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 129/I, and /sup 99/Tc.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Hickox, C. E.; Gartling, D. K.; McVey, D. F.; Russo, A. J. & Nuttall, H. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department