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Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy

Description: Article on the identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Shi, Jinrui; Dixon, R. A.; Gonzales, Robert A.; Kjellbom, Per & Bhattacharyya, Madan Kumar
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Mutation of WRKY transcription factors initiates pith secondary wall formation and increases stem biomass in dicotyledonous plants

Description: Article discussing how the mutation of WRKY transcription factors initiates pith secondary wall formation and increases stem biomass in dicotyledonous plants.
Date: December 21, 2010
Creator: Wang, Huan-Zhong; Avci, Utku; Nakashima, Jin; Hahn, Michael G.; Chen, Fang & Dixon, R. A.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

The impact of biology on risk assessment -- Workshop of the National Research Council`s board on radiation effects research. Meeting report

Description: The linear, nonthreshold extrapolation from a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation derived at higher doses to doses for which regulatory standards are proposed is being challenged by some scientists and defended by others. It appears that the risks associated with exposures to doses of interest are below the risks that can be measured with epidemiologic studies. Therefore, many have looked to biology to provide information relevant to risk assessment. The workshop reported here, ``The Impact of biology on Risk Assessment,`` was planned to address the need for further information by bringing together scientists who have been working in key fields of biology and others who have been contemplating the issues associated specifically with this question. The goals of the workshop were to summarize and review the status of the relevant biology, to determine how the reported biologic data might influence risk assessment, and to identify subjects on which more data is needed.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Fry, R. J. M.; Grosovsky, A.; Hanawalt, P. C.; Jostes, R. F.; Little, J. B.; Morgan, W. F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mathematical challenges from theoretical/computational chemistry

Description: The committee believes that this report has relevance and potentially valuable suggestions for a wide range of readers. Target audiences include: graduate departments in the mathematical and chemical sciences; federal and private agencies that fund research in the mathematical and chemical sciences; selected industrial and government research and development laboratories; developers of software and hardware for computational chemistry; and selected individual researchers. Chapter 2 of this report covers some history of computational chemistry for the nonspecialist, while Chapter 3 illustrates the fruits of some past successful cross-fertilization between mathematical scientists and computational/theoretical chemists. In Chapter 4 the committee has assembled a representative, but not exhaustive, survey of research opportunities. Most of these are descriptions of important open problems in computational/theoretical chemistry that could gain much from the efforts of innovative mathematical scientists, written so as to be accessible introductions to the nonspecialist. Chapter 5 is an assessment, necessarily subjective, of cultural differences that must be overcome if collaborative work is to be encouraged between the mathematical and the chemical communities. Finally, the report ends with a brief list of conclusions and recommendations that, if followed, could promote accelerated progress at this interface. Recognizing that bothersome language issues can inhibit prospects for collaborative research at the interface between distinctive disciplines, the committee has attempted throughout to maintain an accessible style, in part by using illustrative boxes, and has included at the end of the report a glossary of technical terms that may be familiar to only a subset of the target audiences listed above.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. Annual reports for 1997, 1998, 1999

Description: The Roundtable was created in 1984 to provide a unique forum for dialog among top government, university, and industry leaders of the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas regarding issues, problems, and promising opportunities that are facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. These annual reports begin by describing the purpose, structure, and mode of operation of the Roundtable. There follow sections devoted to the council activities, major projects, and follow-up planning, and the activities of the Roundtable working groups. Meeting agendas and publications lists are also included.
Date: December 31, 1999
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable 1996 annual report

Description: The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable was created just over a decade ago to provide a unique forum for dialogue among top government, university, and industry leaders in the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas about issues, problems, and promising opportunities facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. In 1996, Council meetings focused on the following: (1) the impact of information technology on the structure of research and educational organizations; (2) ways to improve communication between the science and engineering community and the public; and (3) new approaches both to measuring the results of research investments, and to communicating those metrics to non-technical decision-makers and to the public. Significant milestones were also achieved in four major projects, representing, impart, follow-up activity from previous Council Meeting discussions: (1) facilitating the Federal Demonstration Partnership, designed to maximize the efficiency of the federal research support system; (2) compiling results of a regional workshop on experiences in industry-university collaborative organization; (3) publishing the results of a study comparing the cost structures for research performed in the industrial, academic, and government laboratory sector; and (4) catalyzing, and participating in, a series of campus-based convocations on stresses being experienced in the research university environment.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics; and Conceptual model of fluid infiltration in fractured media. Project summary, July 28, 1997--July 27, 1998

Description: The title describes the two tasks summarized in this report. The remainder of the report contains information on meetings held or to be held on the subjects. The US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) provides for US participation in international activities in rock mechanics, principally through adherence to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM). It also keeps the US rock mechanics community informed about new programs directed toward major areas of national concern in which rock mechanics problems represent critical or limiting factors, such as energy resources, excavation, underground storage and waste disposal, and reactor siting. The committee also guides or produces advisory studies and reports on problem areas in rock mechanics. A new panel under the auspices of the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics has been appointed to conduct a study on Conceptual Models of Fluid Infiltration in Fractured Media. The study has health and environmental applications related to the underground flow of pollutants through fractured rock in and around mines and waste repositories. Support of the study has been received from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project Office. The new study builds on the success of a recent USNC/RM report entitled Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications (National Academy Press, 1996, 551 pp.). A summary of the new study is provided.
Date: September 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ABCC/RERF: Commemorating the First 50 Years and Looking to the Future [Symposium program]

Description: In 1946, President Harry Truman, in a document currently on display at the entrance to this auditorium, approved a directive to the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council (NAS-NRC) to initiate a long-term investigation of the health effects associated with exposure to radiation from the atomic bombs. With funding provided by the Atomic Energy Commission, now the Department of Energy, NAS-NRC established the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in March 1947. The government of Japan through the Japanese National Institute of Health, became a partner in that endeavor in 1948. In 1975, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) was established and assumed the responsibilities of ABCC. This symposium commemorates 50 years of ABCC/RERF. It is dedicated to the many survivors and their families without whose cooperation we would not have learned as much as we have about the effects of radiation. It is also dedicated to the thousands of employees of RERF and scientists around the world who have contributed through the years to the analysis and interpretation of the information emerging from this unique study.
Date: June 13, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its activities

Description: The Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) coordinates, the National Research Council`s advice to the federal government on solid-earth science issues. The board identifies opportunities for advancing basic research and understanding, reports on applications of earth sciences in such areas as disaster mitigation and resource utilization, and analyzes the scientific underpinnings and credibility of earth science information for resource, environmental and other applications and policy decision. Committees operating under the guidance of the Board conducts studies addressing specific issues within the earth sciences. The current committees are as follows: Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data; Mapping Sciences Committee; Committee on Seismology; Committee on Geodesy; Rediscovering Geography Committee; Committee on Research Programs of the US Bureau of Mines. The following recent reports are briefly described: research programs of the US Bureau of Mines, first assessment 1994; Mount Rainier, active cascade volcano; the national geomagnetic initiative; reservoir class field demonstration program; solid-earth sciences and society; data foundation for the national spatial infrastructure; promoting the national spatial data infrastructure through partnerships; toward a coordinated spatial data infrastructure for the nation; and charting a course into the digital era; guidance to the NOAA`s nautical charting mission.
Date: June 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable 1995 annual report

Description: The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable was created just over a decade ago to provide a unique forum for dialogue among top government, university, and industry leaders of the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas about issues, problems, and promising opportunities that are facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. The open dialogue and informal exchange of ideas preclude a process of making formal recommendations or offering specific advice. Instead, the Roundtable seeks to stimulate new approaches by dissemination of its discussions, and pro-active contacts with organizations that may want to build on the idea base it establishes. After introductory material on the structure and operation of the Roundtable, accomplishments on current projects are described. Projects include: Stresses on research and education at colleges and universities; Formulating US research policies within an international context; The Federal Demonstration project, designed to improve the management of federally-funded research; Analysis of the costs of research in industrial, academic, and federal labs; Industry-university research collaborations; and Public stakeholding in America`s investment in science and technology.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drilling for energy resources

Description: Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.
Date: January 1, 1976
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geodynamics Project. US progress report, 1977

Description: Past work of the US Geodynamics Committee (USGC) is summarized. The USGC devoted considerable discussion at its November 1976, meeting to preparation of an up-to-date statement of the USGC actions developed by USGC reporters. That discussion ultimately led to a number of statements and recommendations, given here. The bulk of this document is comprised of the reporters' reports on the following topics: fine structure of the crust and upper mantle, evolution of oceanic lithosphere, internal processes and properties, crystal growing, large-volume experimentation, application of isotope geochemistry to geodynamics, geodynamic modeling, drilling for scientific purposes, plate boundaries, plate interiors, data centers and repositories, geodynamic activities in the Caribbean area, seismicity and deep structure of the continental margin, and aeromagnetic survey. Appendixes give project correspondents, participants, etc. 23 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)
Date: January 1, 1977
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) and the Panel on Opportunities in Plasma Science and Technology (OPST). Final technical progress report, 1 June 1993--31 May 1994

Description: The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of plasma science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the PLSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of PLSC activities from June 1, 1993 to May 31, 1994. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the PLSC study on opportunities in plasma science and technology. During the above period, the PLSC continued to track and participate in, when requested, discussions on the health of the field. Much of the perspective of the PLSC has been presented in its report Research Briefing on Contemporary Problems in Plasma Science. That report not only has served as the basis for briefings to representatives of the federal government and the community-at-large, but also served as the starting point for the Panel on Opportunities in Plasma Science and Technology (OPST) as it began an assessment of the field. The PLSC also continued its follow-up briefings and discussions on the results of the report Plasma Processing of Materials: Scientific and Technological Opportunities (PPPM). As a result of these activities, the Committee is now working with the NRC Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) to organize a symposium on database needs in plasma processing of materials.
Date: December 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee

Description: The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.
Date: January 1, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department