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Radionuclides in plankton from the South Pacific Basin

Description: We have initiated an investigation of the utility of marine plankton as bioconcentrating samplers of low-level marine radioactivity in the southern hemisphere. A literature review has shown that both freshwater and marine plankton have trace element and radionuclide concentration factors (relative to water) of up to 10/sup 4/. We participated in Operations Deepfreeze 1981 and 1982, collecting a total of 48 plankton samples from the USCGC Glacier on its Antarctic cruises. Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories sampled air, water, rain, and fallout. We were able to measure concentrations in plankton of the naturally-occurring radionuclides /sup 7/Be, /sup 40/K, and the U and Th series, and we believe that we have detected low levels of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 95/Nb in seven samples ranging as far south as 68/sup 0/. Biological identification of the plankton suggests a possible correlation between radionuclide concentration and the protozoa content of the samples. 7 references, 5 figures.
Date: March 23, 1984
Creator: Marsh, K.V. & Buddemeier, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Amplification of a bi-phase shift-key modulated signal by a mm-wave FEL

Description: Bi-phase shift keying (BPSK) is a modulation scheme used in communications and radar in which the phase of a transmitted rf signal is switched in a coded pattern between discrete values differing by {pi} radians. The transmitted information rate (in communications) or resolution (in imaging radar) depends on the rate at which the transmitted signal can be modulated. Modulation rates of greater than 1 GHz are generally desired. Although the instantaneous gain bandwidth of a mm-wave FEL amplifier can be much greater than 10 GHz, slippage may limit the BPSK modulation rate that can be amplified. Qualitative slippage arguments would limit the modulation rate to relatively low values; nevertheless, simulations with a time-dependent FEL code (GINGER) indicate that rates of 2 GHz or more are amplified without much loss in modulation integrity. In this paper we describe the effects of slippage in the simulations and discuss the limits of simple arguments.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T. & Sheaffer, M.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer as a laser system diagnostic: Active and adaptive optical systems

Description: We are incorporating a novel self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer into a large scale laser system as a real time, interactive diagnostic tool for wavefront measurement. The instrument is capable of absolute wavefront measurements accurate to better than {lambda}/10 pv over a wavelength range > 300 nm without readjustment of the optical components. This performance is achieved through the design of both refractive optics and catadioptric collimator to achromatize the Mach-Zehnder reference arm. Other features include polarization insensitivity through the use of low angles of incidence on all beamsplitters as well as an equal path length configuration that allows measurement of either broad-band or closely spaced laser-line sources. Instrument accuracy is periodically monitored in place by means of a thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source that is calibrated off-line with a phase conjugate interferometer. Video interferograms are analyzed using Fourier transform techniques on a computer that includes dedicated array processor. Computer and video networks maintain distributed interferometers under the control of a single analysis computer with multiple user access. 7 refs., 11 figs.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Feldman, M.; Mockler, D.J.; English, R.E. Jr.; Byrd, J.L. & Salmon, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Laser-plasma interaction experiments at laser wavelengths of 1. 064. mu. m, 0. 532. mu. m, and 0. 355. mu. m

Description: The effect of laser wavelength on laser-plasma coupling is one of the critical issues facing the laser driven inertial confinement community. The advantages of using lasers with output wavelength less than 1 ..mu..m, such as enhanced absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency, reduction in parametric instabilities and corresponding suprathermal electron generation, have long been predicted theoretically.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Campbell, E. M.; Mead, W. C. & Turner, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Institutional research and development, FY 1987

Description: The Institutional Research and Development program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to problems in various scientific fields, and long-term interdisciplinary research in support of defense and energy missions. This annual report describes research funded under this program for FY87. (DWL)
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Struble, G. L.; Lawler, G. M.; Crawford, R. B.; Kirvel, R. D.; Peck, T. M.; Prono, J. K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Technician support for operation and maintenance of large fusion experiments: the tandem mirror experiment upgrade (TMX-U) approach

Description: As experiments continue to grow in size and complexity, a few technicians will no longer be able to maintain and operate the complete experiment. Specialization is becoming the norm. Subsystems are becoming very large and complex, requiring a great deal of experience and training for technicians to become qualified maintenance/operation personnel. Formal in-house and off-site programs supplement on-the-job training to fulfill the qualification criteria. This paper presents the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) approach to manpower staffing, some problems encountered, possible improvements, and safety considerations for the successful operation of a large experimental facility.
Date: December 1, 1983
Creator: Mattson, G.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Use of molybdenum ion source electrodes at RTNS-II

Description: Reports are reported for an ongoing effort to optimize D+ beam production by the MATS-III ion source used at RTNS-II. The three seven-aperture electrodes, originally consisting of water-cooled copper, have now been tested using uncooled molybdenum and with water cooling on the second (decel) electrode only. Details of the change, the results of the testing, and the benefits in operation, performance and cost are given.
Date: September 29, 1986
Creator: Massoletti, D.J.; Harter, G.A. & Heikkinen, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Extracted current densities from surface conversion sources of negative ions

Description: The condition for extracting a maximum negative ion current density is found when the product of the radius of the negative ion conversion electrode, the cross-section for negative and positive ion recombination, and the density of positive ions in the ion source equals one. The optimum output is obtained at the highest positive ion density and the smallest electrode radius.
Date: February 10, 1982
Creator: Fink, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cause of pitting in beryllium

Description: Light microscopy, bare-film radiography, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, electron microprobe and physical testing were used to examine beryllium specimens exhibiting a stratified, pitted, pattern after chemical milling. The objective was to find the cause of this pattern. Specimens were found to have voids in excess of density specification allowances. These voids are attributed, at least in part, to the sublimation of beryllium fluoride during the vacuum hot pressing operation. The origin of the pattern is attributed to these voids and etching out of fines and associated impurities. Hot isostatic pressing with a subsequent heat treatment close residual porosity and dispersed impurities enough to correct the problem.
Date: April 16, 1982
Creator: Kershaw, R. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Potential for efficient frequency conversion at high average power using solid state nonlinear optical materials

Description: High-average-power frequency conversion using solid state nonlinear materials is discussed. Recent laboratory experience and new developments in design concepts show that current technology, a few tens of watts, may be extended by several orders of magnitude. For example, using KD*P, efficient doubling (>70%) of Nd:YAG at average powers approaching 100 KW is possible; and for doubling to the blue or ultraviolet regions, the average power may approach 1 MW. Configurations using segmented apertures permit essentially unlimited scaling of average power. High average power is achieved by configuring the nonlinear material as a set of thin plates with a large ratio of surface area to volume and by cooling the exposed surfaces with a flowing gas. The design and material fabrication of such a harmonic generator are well within current technology.
Date: October 28, 1985
Creator: Eimerl, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Energy Program annual report

Description: The national economy is particularly dependent on efficient electrical generation and transportation. Electrical demand continues to grow and will increasingly rely on coal and nuclear fuels. The nuclear power industry still has not found a solution to the problem of disposing of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. Although coal is in ample supply and the infrastructure is in place for its utilization, environmental problems and improved conversion processes remain technical challenges. In the case of transportation, the nation depends almost exclusively on liquid fuels with attendant reliance on imported oil. Economic alternates---synfuels from coal, natural gas, and oil shale, or fuel cells and batteries---have yet to be developed or perfected so as to impact the marketplace. Inefficiencies in energy conversion in almost all phases of resource utilization remain. These collective problems are the focus of the Energy Program.
Date: February 1, 1988
Creator: Borg, I.Y. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Measurement of energy deposited by charged-particle beams in composite targets

Description: We have measured the energy deposited in two types of composite targets by a number of charged-particle beams: targets made of /sup 238/U, Lucite, and polyethylene were exposed to 0.26-GeV protons and 0.33-GeV deuterons, and aluminum-Lucite composites were exposed to 0.5-GeV electrons. In addition, we measured neutrons and gamma rays emitted from solid targets of various materials (including /sup 238/U and iron) exposed to 0.26-GeV protons and 0.33-GeV deuterons. We used passive detectors (thermoluminescence dosimeters, Lexan fission track recorders, and photographic emulsions) to measure the nonfission dose and the fission-fragment dose from the primary beam and its shower of products. Measurements were made at various depths and radial positions in the targets. Plots and numerical values of the measured doses are presented. The emission of neutrons and gamma rays was measured with a liquid-deuterated-benzene detector. In general, the dose profile with depth is similar for 0.26-GeV protons and 0.33-GeV deuterons. The ratio of return neutrons to gamma rays increases with increasing target mass number. Deuterons, however, produce from 1.7 to 5.8 times as many neutrons and gamma rays per particle as do protons.
Date: July 2, 1980
Creator: Farley, E.; Becker, J.; Crase, K.; Howe, R. & Selway, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Physics of antimatter-matter reactions for interstellar propulsion

Description: At the stage of the antiproton-nucleon annihilation chain of events relevant to propulsion the annihilation produces energetic charged pions and gamma rays. If annihilation occurs in a complex nucleus, protons, neutrons, and other nuclear fragments are also produced. The charge, number, and energy of the annihilation products are such that annihilation rocket engine concepts involving relatively low specific impulse (I/sub sp/ approx. = 1000 to 2000 s) and very high I/sub sp/ (3 x 10/sup 7/ s) appear feasible and have efficiencies on the order of 50% for annihilation energy to propulsion energy conversion. At I/sub sp/'s of around 15,000 s, however, it may be that only the kinetic energy of the charged nuclear fragments can be utilized for propulsion in engines of ordinary size. An estimate of this kinetic energy was made from known pieces of experimental and theoretical information. Its value is about 10% of the annihilation energy. Control over the mean penetration depth of protons into matter prior to annihilation is necessary so that annihilation occurs in the proper region within the engine. Control is possible by varying the antiproton kinetic energy to obtain a suitable annihilation cross section. The annihilation cross section at low energies is on the order of or larger than atomic areas due to a rearrangement reaction, but it is very low at high energy where its value is closer to nuclear areas.
Date: August 22, 1986
Creator: Morgan, D.L. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cross Sections for X-Ray Photoelectron-Induced Desorption of Hydrogen Ions From Metal Surfaces

Description: We have measured the cross sections for x-ray photoelectron-induced desorption of hydrogen ions from beryllium, carbon, aluminum, tantalum, and gold surfaces. This report describes the results of the cross-section measurements, and discusses a time-of-flight technique that allows the determination of ionic-desorption cross sections as small as 10/sup -25/ cm/sup 2/ per photoelectron. 19 refs., 7 figs.
Date: September 20, 1985
Creator: Kinney, J. H.; Siekhaus, W. J. & Anderson, R. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Study of impurities in the Tandem Mirror Experiment using extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy

Description: Impurities in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) have been studied using extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy. Three time-resolving absolutely-calibrated normal-incidence monochromators, one on each section of TMX, were used to study the impurity emissions in the wavelength range of 300 A to 1600 A. The instruments on the east end cell and central cell were each capable of obtaining spatially-resolved profiles from 22 chords of the plasma simultaneously while the instrument on the west end cell monitored the central chord. The impurities identified in TMX were carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and titanium. Emphasis was placed upon determining the impurity densities and radiated power losses of the central cell; results indicate that the impurity concentrations were low - less than 0.4% for each species - and that less than 10% of the total net trapped neutral beam power was lost to radiation. The use of titanium gettering on the central cell walls was observed to decrease the brightnesses of singly- and doubly-ionized carbon and oxygen in the central cell plasma. In the end cells, oxygen was the main impurity with a concentration of about 1.5% and was injected by the neutral beams; the other impurities had concentrations of about 0.5%. Radiation losses from the end cells were negligible.
Date: May 12, 1982
Creator: Strand, O. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

Description: Within the last few years, there have also appeared in the Heavy-Ion Fusion literature several studies of targets which have outer tampers. One-dimensional simulations indicate higher target gains with a judicious amount of tamping. But for these targets, a full investigation has not been carried through in regards to conservative criteria for fluid instabilities as well as reasonable imperfections in target fabrication and illumination symmetry which all affect target ignition and burn. Comparisons of these results with the gain survey of Part I would have to be performed with care. These calculations suggest that experiments relating to high temperature disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics.
Date: June 24, 1982
Creator: Mark, J.W.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Use of ICRH for startup and initial heating of the TMX-U central cell

Description: Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) was evaluated and it was found to be satisfactory for use in establishing the conditions necessary to form a thermal barrier in TMX-upgrade (TMX-U). We discuss the constraints that must be satisfied in order to maintain a plasma, and outline a complete startup scenario that ends with the plasma at design parameters. The detailed discussions in this report concentrate on those parts of startup where ICRH is necessary. The ability of ICRH to couple power into a plasma at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance, w/sub ci/, is determined from experiments with a half-turn loop antenna in the Phaedrus tandem mirror central cell. From these experiments, we get the empirical scaling that shows power deposited in the plasma is proportional to the plasma density.
Date: May 1, 1982
Creator: Molvik, A.W. & Falabella, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Is the two-term expansion valid for highly anisotropic systems. The Townsend ionization coefficient in strong runaway as a test case

Description: The Townsend ionization coefficient in the strong runaway regime is calculated within the framework of the two-term expansion. Results are compared to the 1-D model. General features of the two models are qualitatively similar, but quantitative differences by factors of approx. 2 are observed.
Date: July 15, 1982
Creator: Yu, S. S. & Melendez, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ab initio calculations on collisions of low energy electrons with polyatomic molecules

Description: The Kohn variational method is one of simplest, and oldest, techniques for performing scattering calculations. Nevertheless, a number of formal problems, as well as practical difficulties associated with the computation of certain required matrix elements, delayed its application to electron--molecule scattering problems for many years. This paper will describe the recent theoretical and computational developments that have made the complex'' Kohn variational method a practical tool for carrying out calculations of low energy electron--molecule scattering. Recent calculations on a number of target molecules will also be summarized. 41 refs., 7 figs.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Rescigno, T. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Photophoresis and the scattering of electromagnetic radiation

Description: Electron-microscope photographs of soot lend support to the picture in which a soot particle is modeled as a collection of chains of small carbon spheres. The soot particle itself is typically considerably larger than the small carbon spheres making up the chains. Thus the soot particles might have a size approx.0.1 - 1 ..mu..m while the small carbon spheres might have a size approx.0.03 ..mu..m in typical situations. Further, measurements of the density of soot yield values much less than that of normal carbon, indicating that an individual soot particle has a rather small filling factor, i.e., the fraction of the volume of the particle tht is occupied by chains. If a soot particle is taken to be a sphere partially filled with carbon chains, what are its scattering and absorption properties. Several workers have adopted the view that the net scattering and absorption properties can be determined simply by summing the cross-sections for the individual small carbon spheres. We feel that such a procedure cannot be valid in general because it neglects coherence effects among the various randomly located scatterers within the soot particle. It appears that in a first rough approximation the scattering and absorption properties of soot can be determined by estimating the effective dielectric constant of a soot sphere.
Date: September 1, 1985
Creator: Ipser, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Technology for large tandem mirror experiments

Description: Construction of a large tandem mirror (MFTF-B) will soon begin at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Designed to reach break-even plasma conditions, the facility will significantly advance the physics and technology of magnetic-mirror-based fusion reactors. This paper describes the objectives and the design of the facility.
Date: September 4, 1980
Creator: Thomassen, K.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Optical-scattering measurements from 1. 06-. mu. m, 0. 53-. mu. m, and 0. 35-. mu. m laser-heated disk targets

Description: A discussion is presented on scattered light measurements relevant to three of the important parametric instabilities which occur in high intensity laser plasma interactions: stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), the two plasmon decay instability (2-..omega../sub pe/), and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). Most of these experiments were carried out on the ARGUS facility. Its configuration is described for the multiple wavelength experiments, all of which were conducted with one beam illumination of flat disk targets.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Turner, R. E.; Campbell, E. M.; Phillion, D. W.; Mead, W. C.; Ze, F.; Max, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A cryogenic system design for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER)

Description: A conceptual design for ITER was completed last year. The author developed a suitable cryogenic system for ITER as part of this conceptual design effort. An overview of the design is reported. Emphasis is on the fact that cryogenics is a mature science, and a system supporting ITER needs can be made from time-proven components without loss of efficiency or reliability. Because of the large size of the ITER cryogenic system, large numbers of compressors and expanders must be used. Very high reliability is assured by arranging these components in parallel banks where servicing of individual components can be done without interruption of operations. This and other ideas based on the author's experience with Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) operations are described. 5 refs., 3 figs.
Date: September 25, 1991
Creator: Slack, D.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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