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Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery From Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado

Description: This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado''. Optimizing development of highly heterogeneous reservoirs where porosity and permeability vary in unpredictable ways due to facies variations can be challenging. An important example of this is in the algal mounds of the Lower and Upper Ismay reservoirs of the Paradox Basin in Utah and Colorado. It is nearly impossible to develop a forward predictive model to delineate regions of better reservoir development, and so enhanced recovery processes must be selected and designed based upon data that can quantitatively or qualitatively distinguish regions of good or bad reservoir permeability and porosity between existing well control. Recent advances in seismic acquisition and processing offer new ways to see smaller features with more confidence, and to characterize the internal structure of reservoirs such as algal mounds. However, these methods have not been tested. This project will acquire cutting edge, three-dimensional, nine-component (3D9C) seismic data and utilize recently-developed processing algorithms, including the mapping of azimuthal velocity changes in amplitude variation with offset, to extract attributes that relate to variations in reservoir permeability and porosity. In order to apply advanced seismic methods a detailed reservoir study is needed to calibrate the seismic data to reservoir permeability, porosity and lithofacies. This will be done by developing a petrological and geological characterization of the mounds from well data; acquiring and processing the 3D9C data; and comparing the two using advanced pattern recognition tools such as neural nets. In addition, should the correlation prove successful, the resulting data will be evaluated from the perspective of selecting alternative enhanced recovery processes, and their possible implementation. The work is being carried out on ...
Date: July 10, 2003
Creator: La Pointe, Paul; Rebne, Claudia & Dobbs, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming

Description: This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was greatly extended by calibrating wireline logs from 113 wells with incomplete or older-vintage ...
Date: November 18, 2002
Creator: La Pointe, Paul; Hermanson, Jan; Parney, Robert; Eiben, Thorsten; Dunleavy, Mike; Steele, Ken et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery From Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado

Description: This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado'', for the Second Biennial Report covering the time period May 1, 2003 through October 31, 2003. During this period, the project achieved two significant objectives: completion of the acquisition and processing design and specifications 3D9C seismic acquisition and the 3D VSP log; and completion of the permitting process involving State, Tribal and Federal authorities. Successful completion of these two major milestones pave the way for field acquisition as soon as weather permits in the Spring of 2004. This report primarily describes the design and specifications for the VSP and 3D9C surveys.
Date: March 1, 2004
Creator: La Pointe, Paul; Rebne, Claudia & Dobbs, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of resource activities upon repository siting and waste containment with reference to bedded salt

Description: The primary consideration for the suitability of a nuclear waste repository site is the overall ability of the repository to safely contain radioactive waste. This report is a discussion of the past, present, and future effects of resource activities on waste containment. Past and present resource activities which provide release pathways (i.e., leaky boreholes, adjacent mines) will receive initial evaluation during the early stages of any repository site study. However, other resource activities which may have subtle effects on containment (e.g., long-term pumping causing increased groundwater gradients, invasion of saline water causing lower retardation) and all potential future resource activities must also be considered during the site evaluation process. Resource activities will affect both the siting and the designing of repositories. Ideally, sites should be located in areas of low resource activity and low potential for future activity, and repository design should seek to eliminate or minimize the adverse effects of any resource activity. Buffer zones should be created to provide areas in which resource activities that might adversely affect containment can be restricted or curtailed. This could mean removing large areas of land from resource development. The impact of these frozen assets should be assessed in terms of their economic value and of their effect upon resource reserves. This step could require a major effort in data acquisition and analysis followed by extensive numerical modeling of regional fluid flow and mass transport. Numerical models should be used to assess the effects of resource activity upon containment and should include the cumulative effects of different resource activities. Analysis by other methods is probably not possible except for relatively simple cases.
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Ashby, J. & Rowe, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical modeling capabilities to predict repository performance

Description: This report presents a summary of current numerical modeling capabilities that are applicable to the design and performance evaluation of underground repositories for the storage of nuclear waste. The report includes codes that are available in-house, within Golder Associates and Lawrence Livermore Laboratories; as well as those that are generally available within the industry and universities. The first listing of programs are in-house codes in the subject areas of hydrology, solute transport, thermal and mechanical stress analysis, and structural geology. The second listing of programs are divided by subject into the following categories: site selection, structural geology, mine structural design, mine ventilation, hydrology, and mine design/construction/operation. These programs are not specifically designed for use in the design and evaluation of an underground repository for nuclear waste; but several or most of them may be so used.
Date: September 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Second report: development of site suitability criteria for the high level waste repository for Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

Description: Results are presented of mining and geotechnical studies provided to the University in support of the development of site suitability criteria. The work involved literature research, further evaluation of geotechnical and mining site suitability factors, further development of specific geotechnical descriptions and coefficients relating to uncertainties, additional documentation of descriptors and coefficients developed for the Cycle II model, and geotechnical and mining guidance to the overall LLL site suitability work. Work results are summarized in sections on general site suitability, geotechnical data base, descriptors and coefficients, uncertainty considerations, natural resources, hydrology, geology, and documentation. (JRD)
Date: November 1, 1977
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detailed report on tested models companion report 2 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL 10571)

Description: An assessment was performed of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction. Detailed analyses are presented of the theory, power, usability, and performance of the seven models used in conjunction with an ongoing research program aimed at improved understanding and control of ground movements caused by geothermal power production. The models used were: hand-calculation techniques; the nucleus-of-strain method; the one-dimensional Terzaghi consolidation method; the two-dimensional boundary-integral-equation method; two-dimensional finite-element coupled fluid flow and deformation; three-dimensional integrated finite difference, coupled fluid flow, heat flow, and porosity change; and the three-dimensional displacement discontinuity method. (MHR)
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of an inter-layer solute transport algorithm for SOLTR computer program. Part 1. The algorithm

Description: In order to perform studies of the influence of regional groundwater flow systems on the long-term performance of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories, it was determined that an adequate computer model would have to consider the full three-dimensional flow system. Golder Associates' SOLTR code, while three-dimensional, has an overly simple algorithm for simulating the passage of radionuclides from one aquifier to another above or below it. Part 1 of this report describes the algorithm developed to provide SOLTR with an improved capability for simulating interaquifer transport.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Miller, I. & Roman, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Derivation of parameters necessary for the evaluation of performance of sites for deep geological repositories with particular reference to bedded salt, Livermore, California. Volume II. Appendices

Description: The method of selection of parameters to be considered in the selection of a site for underground disposal of radioactive wastes is reported in volume 1. This volume contains the appendix to that report. The topics include: specific rock mechanics tests; drilling investigation techniques and equipment; geophysical surveying; theoretical study of a well text in a nonhomogeneous aquifer; and basic statistical and probability theory that may be used in the derivation of input parameters.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Ashby, J.P.; Rawlings, G.E.; Soto, C.A.; Wood, D.F. & Chorley, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Derivation of parameters necessary for the evaluation of performance of sites for deep geological repositories with particular reference to bedded salt, Livermore, California. Volume I. Main text

Description: A survey of parameters to be considered in the evaluation of sites for deep geologic nuclear waste repositories is presented. As yet, no comprehensive site selection procedure or performance evaluation approach has been adopted. A basis is provided for the development of parameters by discussing both site selection and performance evaluation. Three major groups of parameters are considered in this report: geologic, mining/rock mechanics, and hydrogeologic. For each type, the role of the parameter in the evaluation of repository sites is discussed. The derivation of the parameter by measurement, correlation, inference, or other method is discussed. Geologic parameters define the framework of the repository site and can be used in development of conceptual models and the prediction of long-term performance. Methods for deriving geological parameters include mapping, surveying, drilling, geophysical investigation, and historical and regional analysis. Rock mechanics/mining parameters are essential for the prediction of short-term performance and the development of initial conditions for modeling of long-term performance. Rock mechanics/mapping parameters can be derived by field or laboratory investigation, correlation, and theoretically or empirically based inference. Hydrogeologic parameters are the most important for assessment of long-term radionuclide confinement, since transport throughout the regional hydrogeologic system is the most likely mode of radionuclide escape from geologic repositories. Hydrogeologic parameters can be derived by hydrogeologic mapping and interpretation, hydrogeologic system modeling, field measurements, and lab tests. Procedures used in determination and statistical evaluation of geologic and rock mechanics parameters are discussed.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Ashby, J.P.; Rawlings, G.E.; Soto, C.A.; Wood, D.F. & Chorley, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

General basin modeling for site suitability. Draft report 1. Baseline data

Description: This report summarizes work completed by Golder Associates under Task 2 - Site Suitability specifically for modeling of fluid flow and mass transport in sedimentary basins containing thick shale or salt. It also describes ongoing and future work on the above topic. The purpose of the study is to develop a general model for a nuclear waste repository situated in a deep sedimentary basin environment. The model will be used in conjunction with Golder's fluid flow and mass transport codes to study specific aspects of nuclide transport by groundwater flow.
Date: April 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation of geothermal subsidence

Description: The results of an assessment of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction are summarized. The following subjects are discussed: the prediction process, physical processes of geothermal subsidence, computational models for reservoir flow, computational models for deformation, proficiency assessment, and real and idealized case studies. (MHR)
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of Y/OWI/TM-36: repository design performance in salt, granite, shale or basalt. [Underground disposal of radioactive wastes]

Description: As part of the ongoing work by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to evaluate repository design performance, this memorandum presents a review of the preconceptual repository design described in Y/OWI/TM-36, Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, April 1978. The purpose of this review is: to assess the adequacy of the design procedures and assumptions; to identify inappropriate or unsubstantiated design issues; to identify areas where additional numerical analyses may be required; and to develop data for inclusion in a reference repository design. The preconceptual repository design is presented in the form of 23 volumes of data base, analyses, and design layouts for four rock types: bedded salt, shale, granite and basalt. This memorandum reviews all four repository designs.
Date: September 1, 1979
Creator: Talbot, R. & Nair, O.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Case study data base companion report 3 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL-10571)

Description: The data base developed for selection and evaluation of geothermal subsidence case studies is presented. Data from this data base were used in case studies of Wairakei, The Geysers, and Austin Bayou Prospect (Report LBL 10571).
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

Description: This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.
Date: November 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Third report, development of site suitability and design performance data base for a high level nuclear waste repository

Description: This report presents the results of mining and geotechnical studies provided as support for the development of a technical data base suitable for the generation of a regulatory framework governing high-level nuclear waste disposal: flow path models for basalts, salt domes, and crystalline rocks; simplistic model evaluations; loss of administrative control; repository conceptual designs; repository design considerations; and design performance criteria.
Date: May 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scoping study of salt domes, basalts and crystalline rock as related to long term risk modeling for deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste

Description: Purpose is to provide a preliminary geotechnical data base sufficient to initiate the development of Long-Term Risk Models for salt domes, basalt, and crystalline rock. Geology, hydrology, specific sites, and potential release pathways are considered for each type. A summary table of site suitability characteristics is presented. (DLC)
Date: November 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regional flow and solute transport modeling for site suitability. Part I

Description: The nature of regional flow systems in large sedimentary basins will largely determine the effectiveness of regional flow as a barrier to radionuclide escape from deep geologic repositories. The purpose of the work reported herein and the proposed future work is to develop a methodology for evaluating regional flow barriers by using numerical models. The Williston Basin was chosen as an archetype case for the regional modeling study. However, due to the simplified nature of the study, the results are not meant to represent the behavior of a repository actually placed within the Williston Basin. The major components of this Phase I study are: (1) assembly and reduction of available data; (2) formulation of a simplified geohydrologic model; (3) computer simulation of fluid flow; and (4) computer simulation of solute transport. As of this report, the first two items are essentially completed. Computer simulation of fluid flow will require some revision and further study, which will be done in the second phase of this study. Computer simulation of solute transport has been considered only on a very preliminary basis. Important conclusions of this Phase I study are as follows. Assembly and reduction of data require an extensive work effort. Generally, the parameters describing fluid flow are poorly known on a regional basis and those describing solute transport are unknown.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Rowe, J. & Miller, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical modeling of solute transport in groundwater

Description: Although the Galerkin finite element method has been used for problems of solute transport by flowing groundwater for nearly a decade, there are a number of problems which make its use as a routine modeling technique somewhat difficult. This report discussed three problem areas: boundary conditions, interfaces between materials of different permeabilities or radically different velocity vectors, and numerical instability. Methods are proposed for improving these problem areas and are demonstrated using a sample problem.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Miller, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical processes of compaction companion report 1 to simulation of geothermal subsidence

Description: There are a variety of theories, techniques, and parameters in the subsidence literature. Biot's theory, Terzaghi's theory, and the theory of interacting continua (TINC) are used to explain solid-fluid interaction; stress-strain theories range from linear elastic to e-log p to plasticity and pore-collapse theories. Parameters are numerous: void ratio,, permeability, compaction coefficient, pore compressibility, Young's modulus, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Lame coefficients, coefficient of consolidation, and storage coefficient. The physical processes which govern compaction and deformation in geothermal systems are reviewed. The review is an attempt to provide a reasonably coherent general structure for the theories and parameters which were referred to above. The materials presented is a compendium of existing published work.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K. & Schauer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proposed methodology for completion of scenario analysis for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. [Assessment of post-closure performance for a proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste]

Description: This report presents the methodology to complete an assessment of postclosure performance, considering all credible scenarios, including the nominal case, for a proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Hanford Site, Washington State. The methodology consists of defensible techniques for identifying and screening scenarios, and for then assessing the risks associated with each. The results of the scenario analysis are used to comprehensively determine system performance and/or risk for evaluation of compliance with postclosure performance criteria (10 CFR 60 and 40 CFR 191). In addition to describing the proposed methodology, this report reviews available methodologies for scenario analysis, discusses pertinent performance assessment and uncertainty concepts, advises how to implement the methodology (including the organizational requirements and a description of tasks) and recommends how to use the methodology in guiding future site characterization, analysis, and engineered subsystem design work. 36 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.
Date: November 1, 1984
Creator: Roberds, W.J.; Plum, R.J. & Visca, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical factors which influence repository design in the bedded salt environment

Description: This report describes the geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical considerations applicable to repository design. The topics discussed in the report include: tectonic activity; geologic structure; stratigraphy; rock mechanical properties; and hydrologic properties.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Ashby, J.P.; Nair, O.; Ortman, D. & Rowe, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ITEP: A survey of innovative environmental restoration technologies in the Netherlands and France

Description: The International Technology Exchange Program (ITEP) of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for promoting the import of innovative technologies to better address EM`s needs and the export of US services into foreign markets to enhance US competitiveness. Under this program, potentially innovative environmental restoration technologies, either commercially available or under development in the Netherlands and France, were identified, described, and evaluated. It was found that 12 innovative environmental restoration technologies, which are either commercially available or under development in the Netherlands and France, may have some benefit for the DOE EM program and should be considered for transfer to the United States.
Date: May 1995
Creator: Roberds, W. J.; Voss, C. F. & Hitchcock, S. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A survey of environmental needs and innovative technologies in Germany

Description: The International Technology Program (IT?), formerly the international Technology Exchange Program (ITEP), of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is responsible for promoting: (1) the import of innovative technologies to better address EM`s needs; and (2) the export of US services into foreign markets to enhance US competitiveness. Under this program: (1) the environmental restoration market in Germany was evaluated, including the description of the general types of environmental problems, the environmental regulations, and specific selected contaminated sites; and (2) potentially innovative environmental restoration technologies, either commercially available or under development in Germany, were identified, described and evaluated. It was found that: (1) the environmental restoration market in Germany is very large, on the order of several billion US dollars per year, with a significant portion possibly available to US businesses; and (2) a large number (54) of innovative environmental restoration technologies, which are either commercially available or under development in Germany, may have some benefit to the DOE EM program and should be considered for transfer to the US.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Voss, C.F. & Roberds, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department