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Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Final report

Description: The Mulled Coal process is a technology which has evolved from a line of investigations which began in the 1970`s. There was a major breakthrough in 1990, and since then, with significant support from DOE-PETC, the technology has progressed from the conceptual stage to a proven laboratory process. It is a simple process which involves the addition of a low cost specifically formulated reagent to wet fine coal by mixing the two in a pug mill. Although the converted material (Mulled Coal) retains some of its original surface moisture, it handles, transports, and stores like dry coal. But, unlike thermally dried fine coal Mulled Coal is not dusty, it will not rewet, and it causes no fugitive dust problems. This project was designed to advance the technology from the status of a process which works well in the laboratory to the status of a technology which is fully ready for commercialization. Project objectives were to: 1. Prove the concept that the technology can be used to produce Mulled Coal of a consistent quality, on a continuous basis, at a convincing rate of production, and at a major preparation plant which produces fine clean coal on a commercial basis. 2. Prove the concept that Mulled Coal, either as a blend with coarser clean coal or as a stand-alone fuel will successfully pass through a representative cross section of conventional coal storage, handling and transportation environments without causing any of the problems normally associated with wet fine coal. 3 Test the design and reliability of Mulled Coal circuit equipment and controls. 4. Test the circuit over a wide range of operating conditions. 5. Project scale-up designs for major equipment components and control circuits. 6. Forecast capital and operating costs for commercial circuits ranging from 25 TPH to 75 TPH. This report describes ...
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Maxwell, R.C. Jr. & Jamison, P.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

Description: The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.
Date: March 21, 1996
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

Description: Fine coal production is on the rise in the US, and it will continue to increase as underground mining companies invest in more productive equipment. This report describes a process for wetting of coal fines termed the Mulled Coal Process. No thermal drying is involved.
Date: August 16, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

Description: The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low ( < 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.
Date: September 5, 1996
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

Description: Preliminary results on the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis obtained during the last quarter confirmed that Co catalysts were very sensitive to temperature and deactivated significantly at temperatures above 240{degree}C both in the fixed bed and the slurry bubble column reactors. Following this preliminary investigation, a series of tests were carried out during this period in order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process as well as determine possible means of preventing it. In order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process, the catalysts which had undergone significant deactivation after high temperature (280{degree}C) reaction in either the fixed bed reactor or the slurry bubble column reactor were regenerated and retested in the fixed bed reactor. In both cases the catalysts recovered completely their initial activity. In addition, reactions at very high H{sub 2}CO ratios and high temperatures showed very little deactivation, suggesting that the deactivation of the Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperatures was mainly due carbon formation via the Boudouard reaction. Due to the unreactive nature of this carbon, it could only be removed by calcination. A second series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of certain promoters (Zr, La, Cr, and Re) as well as the effect of another support such as silica on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperature. The results suggest that the deactivation process and rate for most of these catalysts are similar to those of the alumina-supported catalysts tested previously (Co.005 and Co-053), and that none of the promoters helps to slow down the rate of carbon formation at high temperatures above 240{degree}C.
Date: October 25, 1995
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

Description: A 3,183-hour long catalyst aging slurry bubble column reactor test run utilizing one of the selected catalysts prepared by Calsicat started on January 8, 1996 was ended on May 20, 1996. The effects of temperature, pressure, and catalyst age on catalyst productivity, product distribution, methane yields, Anderson-Shulz-Flory chain growth probability were determined utilizing one of the bench-scale slurry bubble column reactors. Experimental details about this run as well as the results and conclusions derived from it will be provided in the final report.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

Description: The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this fourth quarter of the contract period, activities were underway under Tasks 2 and 3. Sufficient characterization of the bench-scale testing and pilot-plant testing results enabled the design and procurement activities to move forward. On that basis, activities in the areas of design and procurement that had been initiated during the previous quarter were conducted and completed.
Date: August 20, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

Description: The major activities of the period were production operations of the demonstration circuit at Drummond`s Chetopa Preparation Plant near Graysville, Alabama. As the shakedown runs had shown, excellent quality Mulled Coal could be produced, and a total of 870 tonnes (966 tons) was produced. Quality was consistently better than the acceptable level. Immediately following the completion of the production demonstration, removal of equipment and decommissioning of the demonstration facility was undertaken and completed.
Date: August 22, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

Description: The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled Coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. The Mulled Coal circuit was installed in an empty bay at the Chetopa Preparation Plant. Equipment has been installed to divert a 2.7 tonnes/hr (3 tons/hr) slipstream of the froth concentrate to a dewatering centrifuge. The concentrated wet coal fines from the centrifuge dropped through a chute directly into a surge hopper and feed system for the Mulled Coal circuit. The Mulled Coal product was gravity discharged from the circuit to a truck or product discharge area from which it will be hauled to a stockpile located at the edge of the clean coal stockpile area. During the 3-month operating period, the facility produced 870 tonnes (966 tons) of the Muffed Coal for evaluation in various storage, handling, and transportation equipment and operations. Immediately following the production demonstration, the circuit was disassembled and ...
Date: August 22, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

Description: The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled Coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: the Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant; the wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation; and a wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this reporting period, virtually all of the technical activities and progress was made in the areas of circuit installation and startup operations. Work in these activity areas are described.
Date: August 21, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvement of storage, handling and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

Description: The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this third quarter of the contract period, activities were underway under Tasks 2 and 3. Sufficient characterization of the feedstock coal options at the Chetopa Plant was conducted and mulling characteristics determined to enable a decision to be made regarding the feedstock selection. It was decided that the froth concentrate will be the feedstock wet fine coal used for the project. On that basis, activities in the areas of design and procurement were initiated.
Date: August 16, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997

Description: The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. No. 13

Description: The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.
Date: September 5, 1996
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons

Description: Energy International is a leader in catalyst and process development as it relates to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology. Through this activity, a concept evolved for a new technique for capturing the fuel value in the associated natural gas contained in crude oil. In the new concept, the dissolved natural gas would be processed via F-T technology to produce light hydrocarbons that would then, in one manifestation of this concept, be redissolved in the crude oil to produce a lighter crude than the original, containing all of the natural gas, but with the vapor pressure of the crude lowered to an acceptable level via the conversion process. This technique would be of particular interest in those instances where the alternative methods of collections and utilizing the associated natural gas were expensive. A study of the application of this technology was undertaken by EI with support from the DOE.
Date: December 31, 1979
Creator: Singleton, A.H., Cooper, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

Description: This project`s goal is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor. During the seventh quarter, significant progress in several areas has enabled us to make a number of important conclusions. Preliminary catalyst preparation of 3 batches of a Ru-promoted 20% Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has confirmed the similarity in catalysts prepared by Energy International and by Calsicat using the same procedure. This similarity was evident in both fixed and SBC reactor studies. All TiO{sub 2}-supported Co catalysts have been found to have poor F-T properties in both the fixed-bed and SBC reactors. These catalysts had been prepared following exactly the procedures given in the Exxon patents. One of the main problems in using TiO{sub 2} as a support is the fact that it has low surface area for supporting a 20 wt % Co catalyst. Another problem is that it does not seem to be robust enough for use in a SBC reactor. Ru promotion of Co/SiO{sub 2} does not have as dramatic an effect on catalyst activity as seen for Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, it does play a major role in maintaining higher activity (factor of 2 in the SBCR) when K is added to Co/Sr/SiO{sub 2}. Zr has been clearly shown by us to significantly enhance the F-T activity of Co/SiO{sub 2}. Such promotion is a basis for many of the Shell cobalt F-T patents. Latest results indicate that Zr also improves the activity of Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, although the methane selectivity is also slightly elevated. Finally, for our design of a ``benchmark`` Co F- T catalyst, research has now shown using both fixed-bed and SBC reactors that 0.3 wt % K is the optimum amount to use with Ru- promoted 20 wt % Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. ...
Date: May 31, 1995
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995

Description: The goal of this project is the development of a commercially-viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. The major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. The project consists of five major tasks: catalyst development; catalyst testing; catalyst reproducibility tests; catalyst aging tests; and preliminary design and cost estimate for a demonstrate scale catalyst production facility. Technical accomplishments during this reporting period include the following. It appears that the higher activity obtained for the catalysts prepared using an organic solution and reduced directly without prior calcination was the result of higher dispersions obtained under such pretreatment. A Ru-promoted Co catalyst on alumina with 30% Co loading exhibited a 4-fold increase in dispersion and a 2-fold increase in activity in the fixed-bed reactor from that obtained with the non-promoted catalyst. Several reactor runs have again focused on pushing conversion to higher levels. The maximum conversion obtained has been 49.7% with 26g catalyst. Further investigations of the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis were started using a low activity catalyst and one of the most active catalysts. The three 1 kg catalyst batches prepared by Calsicat for the reproducibility and aging studies were tested in both the fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors under the standard reaction conditions. The effects of adding various promoters to some cobalt catalysts have also been addressed. Results are presented and discussed.
Date: June 28, 1995
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

Description: The objective of this Project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation Procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported CO catalysts with desired activity, sleectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Seven new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3. Two more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat. The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued. Fixed-bed reactor testing of the catalysts was continued. Six new catalysts were tested for their F-T synthesis performance. An investigation of the effect of pretreatment in various atmospheres (calcination in air or nitrogen prior to reduction in hydrogen, direct reduction without prior calcination, and reductiono)ddation-reduction (ROR)) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period. Under subtask 2.2 during this reporting period a total of 11 runs were made in the two slurry bubble column reactors with eleven catalysts, including five on alumina, two from Calsicat, one WGS blend, and three on silica support. Four high CO conversion runs were made. Data were compiled to compare the CO conversions and product selectivities of the-methane reduction catalysts.
Date: May 11, 1995
Creator: Singleton, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mulled coal: A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate

Description: Energy International is developing a technology that will create a staged formulation with the first coal form (Mulled Coal) that can be stored, transported, and pumped. Just prior to combustion, the Mulled Coal (MC) would be modified to provide the properties needed for proper atomization. This concept is an alternative to the expensive and energy intensive thermal drying processing of fine coal wet cakes. The material is suitable for both direct feed use in conventional and fluid bed combustors as well as on-site conversion to combustible slurries. By maintaining the coal form relatively close to the feed wet cake, only minor processing with low additive levels and low energy blending needed at the point of production. Its conversion to slurry or other use-feed form is made near the time of use and thus the requirements for stability, climatic control, and other storage, transport, and handling requirements are much less severe.
Date: October 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mulled coal---A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate

Description: The storage, transport and handling of beneficiated coals in the form of a modified wet cake ( mulled coal'') to yield a coal water fuel having acceptable properties for atomization and combustion on industrial, commercial and/or residential scales, have been investigated. The Mulled Coal project is divided into a series of tasks designed to produce formulations and system designs suitable to convert fine coal wet cakes'' into a material that can be stored, handled, and transported to a site where it can be utilized as a fuel in existing and developing combustion devices. (VC)
Date: May 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts

Description: A computer search of both the open and the patent literature was conducted in order to ascertain the current state of cobalt-based catalyst technology for F-T synthesis. Two series of literature searches were conducted, one dealing specifically with cobalt catalysts for F-T synthesis and the other focusing on the preparation and/or characterization of supported cobalt catalysts including those not used for F-T synthesis. An initial screening of the literature was carried out by examining the 942 abstracts obtained from these searches. The main objective of this initial screening was the selection of the most pertinent publications for this work. out of the 230 patent references obtained from the computer search, about 90 were found to be directly related the preparation of cobalt catalysts and their use in FT synthesis. Copies of patents (78 patents) not available within the group have been ordered but not yet received. Based on a preliminary analysis,of the abstracts of the most pertinent patents a distribution among the various patent assignees is given in Table 1. As can be seen in Table 1, most of the patents for Co FT catalysts have been assigned to very few companies, the first four, i.e. Exxon, Shell, Gulf, and Statoil representing the most relevant ones. This preliminary analysis of the patent literature permitted a selection of a number of benchmark catalysts the formulations of which will be based on the patents of these four companies.
Date: March 4, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization and supply of coal based fuels

Description: Studies and data applicable for fuel markets and coal resource assessments were reviewed and evaluated to provide both guidelines and specifications for premium quality coal-based fuels. The fuels supplied under this contract were provided for testing of advanced combustors being developed under Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsorship for use in the residential, commercial and light industrial (RCLI) market sectors. The requirements of the combustor development contractors were surveyed and periodically updated to satisfy the evolving needs based on design and test experience. Available coals were screened and candidate coals were selected for further detailed characterization and preparation for delivery. A team of participants was assembled to provide fuels in both coal-water fuel (CWF) and dry ultrafine coal (DUC) forms. Information about major US coal fields was correlated with market needs analysis. Coal fields with major reserves of low sulfur coal that could be potentially amenable to premium coal-based fuels specifications were identified. The fuels requirements were focused in terms of market, equipment and resource constraints. With this basis, the coals selected for developmental testing satisfy the most stringent fuel requirements and utilize available current deep-cleaning capabilities.
Date: June 1, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mulled Coal: A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate

Description: This report covers activities from April 1, 1991 to June 30, 1991. During this period we have: evaluated and identified a number of materials that can serve as mulling agents: enhanced our understanding of the mulling process and required concentration of the various mulling agents; selected and procured equipment needed for systems for continuous processing; and procured the feedstocks needed for Phase II of the program.
Date: September 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September 25, 1992 to December 31, 1992

Description: The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.
Date: July 29, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department