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The effect of yield strength on side-bonding upset welds

Description: During the course of 9{degree} tapered side-bonding resistance upset weld development at Mound, various studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of yield strength on welds in 304L stainless steel. The results of these studies have concluded that at high yield strengths there may be a minor reduction in the length of Class 2 or better bond. Satisfactory welds have been produced with materials having yield strengths ranging from 36.0 to 141.0 ksi. However, when body yield strengths exceed 80.0 ksi a minor decrease in bond lengths begins. A significant inverse relationship between stem yield strength and bond length was shown to exist. 8 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.
Date: September 24, 1991
Creator: Miller, R.G. & Perkins, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sensitivity testing and analysis

Description: New methods of sensitivity testing and analysis are proposed. The new test method utilizes Maximum Likelihood Estimates to pick the next test level in order to maximize knowledge of both the mean, {mu}, and the standard deviation, {sigma} of the population. Simulation results demonstrate that this new test provides better estimators (less bias and smaller variance) of both {mu} and {sigma} than the other commonly used tests (Probit, Bruceton, Robbins-Monro, Langlie). A new method of analyzing sensitivity tests is also proposed. It uses the Likelihood Ratio Test to compute regions of arbitrary confidence. It can calculate confidence regions, for {mu}, {sigma}, and arbitrary percentiles. Unlike presently used methods, such as the program ASENT which is based on the Cramer-Rao theorem, it can analyze the results of all sensitivity tests, and it does not significantly underestimate the size of the confidence regions. The new test and analysis methods will be explained and compared to the presently used methods. 19 refs., 12 figs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Neyer, B.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Instrumented drop ball tester for percussion primers

Description: The drop ball tester has historically been used for determining the threshold characteristics of percussion primers. Typically, the data obtained from such a tester show a wide variation with significantly large standard deviations. This requires that the acceptance specifications for primers be fairly lax. To determine how much of the data scatter was due to the tester alone, a drop ball tester was instrumented with a force monitoring gage, velocity capabilities, deflection gages, and a pressure time output measuring system. This paper deals with the basic fundamental physics involved with the tester and presents results of improvements to the tester geometry. Threshold test results are presented, correlating all of the variables measured. 8 refs., 10 figs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Woods, C.M.; Robinson, M.A.; Merten, C.W.; Robbins, V.E. (EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (United States)) & Begeal, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative nondestructive density determinations of very low-density carbon foams

Description: The carbon density and the carbon distribution in low-density foams that were manufactured by a modified salt-replica process were determined by bulk measurements of weight and volume and by x-ray computed tomography (CT). When determining the carbon density, both methods yielded similar results, however, the high spatial resolution of CT was found to yield nondestructive quantitative information on the carbon distribution that was not available from bulk measurements. The highest and lowest foam densities were found to occur at the edges and the interior, respectively. The carbon density at the edge was found to be a few percent up to 20 percent higher than the average foam density. The percentage of carbon buildup at the edge was determined to be inversely proportional to the foal density, and in addition, the gradient compared favorably with calculations from Fick's second low of diffusion. A calculated diffusion coefficient was interpreted in terms of foam manufacturing in the modified salt-replica process. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Moddeman, W.E.; Kramer, D.P.; Firsich, D.W.; Trainer, P.D.; Back, P.S.; Smith, S.D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The large volume calorimeter for measuring the pressure cooker'' shipping container

Description: A precise, low wattage, large volume calorimeter system has been developed at Mound to measure two configurations of the 12081 containment vessel. This system was developed and constructed to perform verification measurements at the Savannah River Site. The calorimeter system has performance design specifications of {plus minus}0.3% error above the 2-watt level, and {plus minus}(0.03% plus 0.006 watts) at power levels below 2 watts (one sigma). Data collected during performance testing shows measurement errors well within this range, even down to 0.1-watt power levels. The development of this calorimeter shows that ultra-precise measurements can be achieved on extremely large volume sample configurations. 1 ref., 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Kasperski, P.W.; Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R. (EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (United States)); Baker, L.B. & MacMurdo, K.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The dry heat exchanger calorimeter system

Description: A radiometric isothermal heat flow calorimeter and preconditioner system that uses air instead of water as the heat exchange medium has been developed at Mound. The dry heat exchanger calorimeter is 42 inches high by 18 inches in diameter and the preconditioner is a 22 inch cube, making it extremely compact compared to existing units. The new system is ideally suited for transportable, stand-alone, or glovebox applications. Preliminary tests of the system have produced sample measurements with standard deviations less than 0.25% and sample errors less than 0.50%. These tests have shown that the dry heat exchanger system will yield acceptance data with an accuracy comparable to those of Mound water bath systems now in use. 4 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Renz, D.P.; Wetzel, J.R.; James, S.J.; Kasperski, P.W. & Duff, M.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maximum credible event determination for the surveillance powder samples and their handling containers

Description: An investigation was done to determine the maximum credible event value for samples of explosives and disassembled components up to 1.2 g when stored in conductive plastic vials as packaged and handled, stored, or transported at Mound. The test was performed at Test Firing, with photographs taken before and after the test. The standard propagation test setup was used; a vial containing 1.2 g of PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) was surrounded by other like vials containing 1.2-g samples of PETN. The 1.2-g PETN pellet was then ignited by an EX-12 detonator. The test showed that there was no propagation and that the maximum credible event value for the handling tray is 1.2 g. The test also showed that when the tray is placed in a metal container the MCE value will still be 1.2 g. 9 figs.
Date: September 19, 1991
Creator: Jones, R.B. & Cogan, J.D. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Moisture monitors for the Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility

Description: Three types of moisture monitors: MCM Model Dewluxe-20, Panametrics Model System One, and Shaw Model SHA-TRS were tested for accuracy and speed of response over low (10--50 ppm H{sub 2}O), medium (100--500 ppm H{sub 2}O), and high (500--4000 ppm H{sub 2}O) concentration ranges. The results for the three instruments tested (one of each kind) showed that the MCM instrument was generally more accurate and responded more quickly than the other two instruments, with the Panametrics instrument being less accurate (except at low concentration) and slower to respond, and the Shaw instrument was the least accurate and least responsive of the three instruments during the tests made.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Hedley, W H; Gault, D J & Mielke, R L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1991

Description: Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear, and energy technology. The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound`s operations on the population and the environment. This report summarizes data from the Environmental Monitoring Program, through which Mound maintains continuous surveillance of radiological and nonradiological substances released from the facility.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Bauer, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department