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Ocean current observations near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 1993 to 1994: Relation to wastewater discharge dispersal

Description: This report presents analyses of current measurements from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica during December, 1993 to November, 1994, in relation to dispersal of the McMurdo Station wastewater plume. Data collected from 1991 to 1993 are also discussed here. Six current meters were deployed near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, from December 1993 to November 1994. Five functioned properly throughout the observation period, and one failed. Analyses of 5 data series include: (1) summaries of current speed and direction, (2) directional analyses of flow, (3) time series current vectors averaged over 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, (4) principal axes of flow, (5) maps of mean seasonal flow, (6) progressive vector plots, (7) spectral analyses, and (8) low-pass filtered (30h) time series of currents at McMurdo Station. Observations of flow near McMurdo Station during 1994 were generally similar to 1993. Short term variation in flow was related principally to diurnal tidal motions. Longer period oscillations in flow such as seasonal shifts, and non-periodic changes in current speed and direction were likely related to changes in ice cover and wind stress in the vicinity of McMurdo Station or over much larger scales or both. Three distinct oceanographic {open_quote}seasons{close_quote} were apparent in time series from 1992 to 1994, from stations furthest offshore, where the effects of local topography are minimal. The spring-summer (Oct.-Jan.) period of both years was dominated by regional southward flow, which generates a counter-clockwise eddy (McMurdo Gyre) adjacent to McMurdo Station. With regard to dispersal of the wastewater plume from McMurdo Station, observations of currents during 1994 generally corroborate those from 1993, and the recommendation that the outfall pipe should be repositioned offshore of the McMurdo Gyre is supported.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Barry, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994 (First quarter of FY-95)

Description: The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three ma or activity categories: (1) Advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, (2) Development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and (3) Increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified in Table ES-1. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized in Table ES-2.
Date: July 1995
Creator: Kiser, D. M. & Brown, H. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

Description: Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Tullis, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 1, Sealed sources held by specific licensees

Description: Sealed sources are small, relatively high-activity radioactive sources typically encapsulated in a metallic container. The activities can range from less than 1 mCi to over 1,000 Ci. They are used in a variety of industries and are commonly available. Many of the sources will be classified as Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) for the purpose of waste disposal. The US Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of this class of low-level radioactive waste. To better understand the scope of the GTCC LLW situation regarding sealed sources and to provide data to a model that projects future quantities of GTCC material, data from a comprehensive 1991 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) survey and a related 1992 survey of Agreement States were analyzed to estimate the number, volume, and activity of Potential GTCC sealed sources currently available from specific licensees. Potential GTCC sealed sources are sources that exceed the limits stated in 10 CFR 61 when isotope concentrations are averaged over the volume of the capsule. Based on the surveys, the estimated number of existing Potential GTCC sealed sources held by specific licensees is 89,000, with an unpackaged volume of 0.93 m{sup 3} and an activity of 2,300,000 Ci. However, current disposal practices allow concentration averaging over the disposal container, substantially reducing the number of sealed sources which will actually be classified as GTCC LLW.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Harris, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 3, Sealed sources held by general licensees

Description: This is the third volume in a series of three volumes characterizing the population of sealed sources that may become greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW). In this volume, those sources possessed by general licensees are discussed. General-licensed devices may contain sealed sources with significant amounts of radioactive material. However, the devices are designed to be safe to use without special knowledge of radiological safety practices. Devices containing Am-241 or Cm-244 sources are most likely to become GTCC LLW after concentration averaging. This study estimates that there are about 16,000 GTCC devices held by general licensees; 15,000 of these contain Am-241 sources and 1,000 contain Cm-244 sources. Additionally, this study estimates that there are 1,600 GTCC devices sold to general licensees each year. However, due to a lack of available information on general licensees in Agreement States, these estimates are uncertain. This uncertainty is quantified in the low and high case estimates given in this report, which span approximately an order of magnitude.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Harris, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CHEMCON User`s Manual, Version 3.1

Description: CHEMCON is a computer program developed to analyze thermal transients of tokamak fusion reactors. It contains a one dimensional, cylindrical geometry, conduction model that allows a variety of heat transfer modes within nodes and at node boundaries. Solid regions can be grouped into segments that communicate at their boundaries through a radiation enclosure model. CHEMCON includes a single volume, pressurization/condensation model that is used to include the effects of an in-vessel LOCA and the resulting heat transfer between hot surfaces and cold surfaces in contact with this volume. The code includes properties for 11 solid materials and two gases. CHEMCON also contains specialized models for modeling chemical reactions of node boundaries with air and steam including the gases produced from these reactions. In addition, a model treating the collapse of radiation shields within a gap is also included. CHEMCON is used mainly to simulate the thermal transient for post-blowdown loss-of-coolant-accidents.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Gaeta, M.J. & Merrill, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commercial disposal options for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory low-level radioactive waste

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated site. Significant quantities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) have been generated and disposed of onsite at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The INEL expects to continue generating LLW while performing its mission and as aging facilities are decommissioned. An on-going Performance Assessment process for the RWMC underscores the potential for reduced or limited LLW disposal capacity at the existing onsite facility. In order to properly manage the anticipated amount of LLW, the INEL is investigating various disposal options. These options include building a new facility, disposing the LLW at other DOE sites, using commercial disposal facilities, or seeking a combination of options. This evaluation reports on the feasibility of using commercial disposal facilities.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Porter, C.L. & Widmayer, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commercial low-level radioactive waste transportation liability and radiological risk

Description: This report was prepared for States, compact regions, and other interested parties to address two subjects related to transporting low-level radioactive waste to disposal facilities. One is the potential liabilities associated with low-level radioactive waste transportation from the perspective of States as hosts to low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The other is the radiological risks of low-level radioactive waste transportation for drivers, the public, and disposal facility workers.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Quinn, G.J.; Brown, O.F. II & Garcia, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commercial low-level radioactive waste transportation safety history

Description: An excellent safety record has been established for the transport of commercial low-level radioactive waste. By using the Radioactive Material Incident Report data base to evaluate transportation accidents involving commercial low-level radioactive waste, it was found that there have been only four transportation accidents involving the release of commercial low-level radioactive waste in the last 20 years. The accidents were minor, and the released materials were quickly repackaged. There has never been a radiologically related injury or death associated with a transportation accident involving commercial low-level radioactive waste.
Date: March 1, 1992
Creator: Garcia, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparative approaches to siting low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

Description: This report describes activities in nine States to select site locations for new disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. These nine States have completed processes leading to identification of specific site locations for onsite investigations. For each State, the status, legal and regulatory framework, site criteria, and site selection process are described. In most cases, States and compact regions decided to assign responsibility for site selection to agencies of government and to use top-down mapping methods for site selection. The report discusses quantitative and qualitative techniques used in applying top-down screenings, various approaches for delineating units of land for comparison, issues involved in excluding land from further consideration, and different positions taken by the siting organizations in considering public acceptance, land use, and land availability as factors in site selection.
Date: July 1, 1994
Creator: Newberry, W.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of the radiological and chemical toxicity of lead

Description: This report estimates the worst-case radiological dose to an individual from ingested lead containing picocurie levels of radionuclides and then compares the calculated radiological health effects to the chemical toxic effects from that same lead. This comparison provides an estimate of the consequences of inadvertently recycling, in the commercial market, lead containing nominally undetectable concentrations of radionuclides. Quantitative expressions for the radiological and chemical toxicities of lead are based on concentrations of lead in the blood stream. The result shows that the chemical toxicity of lead is a greater health hazard, by orders of magnitude, than any probable companion radiation dose.
Date: March 1995
Creator: Beitel, G. A. & Mott, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Compliance agreements at the INEL: A success story

Description: The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), is the storage facility for approximately 135,000 containers of radioactive mixed waste that must be stored in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Collectively, the compliance and safety basis documents governing the operation of the storage facility contain approximately 2,500 specific, identifiable requirements. Critical to the compliance with these 2,500 requirements was the development of a process which converted these requirements to a form and format that allowed implementation at the operator level. Additionally, to ensure continued compliance, a method of identifying and controlling implementing documents is imperative. This paper discusses the methods employed to identify, implement, and control these requirements.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: McBath, W.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 1

Description: This report presents a comprehensive inventory of the radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried from 1984 through 2003 in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The project to compile the inventory is referred to as the recent and projected data task. The inventory was compiled primarily for use in a baseline risk assessment under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The compiled information may also be useful for environmental remediation activities that might be necessary at the RWMC. The information that was compiled has been entered into a database termed CIDRA-the Contaminant Inventory Database for Risk Assessment. The inventory information was organized according to waste generator and divided into waste streams for each generator. The inventory is based on waste information that was available in facility operating records, technical and programmatic reports, shipping records, and waste generator forecasts. Additional information was obtained by reviewing the plant operations that originally generated the waste, by interviewing personnel formerly employed as operators, and by performing nuclear physics and engineering calculations. In addition to contaminant inventories, information was compiled on the physical and chemical characteristics and the packaging of the 99 waste streams. The inventory information for waste projected to be buried at the SDA in the future was obtained from waste generator forecasts. The completeness of the contaminant inventories was confirmed by comparing them against inventories in previous reports and in other databases, and against the list of contaminants detected in environmental monitoring performed at the RWMC.
Date: May 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 2

Description: This is the second volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report.
Date: May 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Concrete decontamination scoping tests

Description: This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete.
Date: January 1995
Creator: Archibald, K. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 3

Description: This is the third volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report.
Date: May 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Constrained noninformative priors

Description: The Jeffreys noninformative prior distribution for a single unknown parameter is the distribution corresponding to a uniform distribution in the transformed model where the unknown parameter is approximately a location parameter. To obtain a prior distribution with a specified mean but with diffusion reflecting great uncertainty, a natural generalization of the noninformative prior is the distribution corresponding to the constrained maximum entropy distribution in the transformed model. Examples are given.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Atwood, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

Description: The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Denney, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Criticality evaluation and protocol for DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels

Description: This report is a continuation of repository criticality evaluation work. Both the probability and consequences of a criticality were considered. A long-term, low-power, water-moderated criticality was the most likely of those considered. Its probability was low but not low enough to be dismissed. The governing regulation, 40 CFR 191, allows an event to be dismissed if it has less than one chance in 10,000 of occurring in 10,000 years. This implies a regulatory concern threshold of 10-8/yr. Even if such an event occurred, the repository inventory would still be dominated by the disposed fuel and waste and no significant additional releases would be expected. The major categories of criticality investigated were: water-moderated with fast or slow reactivity insertion, dry (hard-spectrum) with fast or slow reactivity insertion, water-moderated on the surface due to human intrusion, and far field. Fault trees were prepared to assess these scenarios. As a result of this study, the probability of a criticality in 10,000 years was revised from 3x10{sup -3} to 5x10{sup -4}, primarily through the elimination of conservatism and correction of assumptions. The presence of water is a major concern in criticality studies. The possibility of flooding due to water table rise had been dismissed in previous studies. Conservative models indicate that this is a defensible position. The possibility of a silica moderated criticality was considered briefly. The preliminary study identified isotopes of concern for release and these were verified by several comparative methods. Most isotopes had similar ratios across source categories and those that did not could be accounted for by fuel or waste characteristics. The ORIGEN2 code was validated to be sufficiently accurate for PA purposes for the low-power, long-term scenario considered in the criticality study.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Cresap, D.A.; Sentieri, P.J. & Wilson, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office evaluation of feasibility studies for private sector treatment of alpha and TRU mixed wastes

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is currently storing a large quantity of alpha contaminated mixed low level waste which will require treatment prior to disposal. The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) recognized that current knowledge and funding were insufficient to directly pursue services for the requisite treatment. Therefore, it was decided that private sector studies would be funded to clarify cost, regulatory, technology, and contractual issues associated with procuring treatment services. This report analyzes the three private sector studies procured and recommends a path forward for DOE in procuring retrieval, assay, characterization, and treatment services for INEL transuranic and alpha contaminated mixed low level waste. This report was prepared by a team of subject matter experts from the INEL referred to as the DOE-ID Evaluation Team.
Date: May 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design considerations for pump-and-treat remediation based on characterization of industrial injection wells: Lessons learned from the groundwater interim action at the test area north of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a 2,305 km{sup 2} (890 mi{sup 2}) Federal Facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The Test Area North (TAN) complex is located approximately 80 km (50 mi) northwest of Idaho Falls in the northern portion of the HSTEL and extends over an area of approximately 30 km{sup 2} (12 mi{sup 2}). The Technical Support Facility (TSF) is centrally located within TAN and consists of several experimental and support facilities for conducting research and development activities on nuclear reactor performance. Operations at TAN were initiated in the early 1950s to support the U.S. Air Force aircraft nuclear propulsion project and have continued over the years with various experimental and testing facilities. The TSF-05 Injection well was used from 1953 to 1972 to dispose of TAN liquid wastes in the fractured basalt of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was first identified as a groundwater contaminant in 1987 when it was found in the TAN drinking water above acceptable levels. The TAN Groundwater Interim Action at the INEL was intended to provide both interim containment and clean-up of contaminated groundwater resulting from the 40-year old injection well, TSF-05. The primary decontamination objective of the Groundwater Treatment Facility (GWTF) is to remove volatile organic compounds, primarily TCE. A pump-and-treat technology using air stripping, carbon adsorption, and resin ion exchange for strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) was selected in the Operable Unit 1-07A Groundwater Interim Action Record of Decision. Operations started on February 16, 1994 and activities were suspended on January 23, 1995 due to the inability to meet Remedial Action Objectives (RAOs).
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Cotten, G.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of iodine to compliment mass spectrometric measurements

Description: The dose of iodine-129 to facility personnel and the general public as a result of past, present, and future activities at DOE sites is of continuing interest, WINCO received about 160 samples annually in a variety of natural matrices, including snow, milk, thyroid tissue, and sagebrush, in which iodine-129 is determined in order to evaluate this dose, Currently, total iodine and the isotopic ratio of iodine-127 to iodine-129 are determined by mass spectrometry. These two measurements determine the concentration of iodine-129 in each sample, These measurements require at least 16 h of mass spectrometer operator time for each sample. A variety of methods are available which concentrate and determine small quantities of iodine. Although useful, these approaches would increase both time and cost. The objective of this effort was to determine total iodine by an alternative method in order to decrease the load on mass spectrometry by 25 to 50%. The preparation of each sample for mass spectrometric analysis involves a common step--collection of iodide on an ion exchange bed. This was the focal point of the effort since the results would be applicable to all samples.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Hohorst, F.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a cumulative risk assessment for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s waste area group 2

Description: In 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was added to the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List of Superfund sites. A Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) for the INEL was signed by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), EPA, and the State of Idaho in December 1991. The goal of this agreement is to ensure that potential or actual INEL releases of hazardous substances to the environment are thoroughly investigated in accordance with the National Contingency Plan (NCP) and that appropriate response actions are taken as necessary to protect human health and the environment. The Test Reactor Area (TRA) is included as Waste Area Group (WAG) 2 of ten INEL WAGs identified in the FFA/CO. WAG 2 consists of 13 operable units (OUs) which include pits, tanks, rubble piles, ponds, cooling towers, wells, french drains, perched water and spill areas. OU 2-13 is the Comprehensive Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for WAG 2. The study presented here is a preliminary evaluation of the comprehensive risk for WAG-2. This investigation will be used as the basis of the WAG-2 comprehensive baseline risk assessment (BRA), and it will serve as a model for other INEL comprehensive risk assessments. The WAG-2 preliminary risk evaluation consisted of two broad phases. These phases were (1) a site and contaminant screening that was intended to support the identification of COPCs and risk assessment data gaps, and (2) an exposure pathway analysis that evaluated the comprehensive human health risks associated with WAG-2. The primary purposes of the investigation were to screen WAG-2 release sites and contaminants, and to identify risk assessment data gaps, so the investigation will be referred to as the WAG-2 Screening and Data Gap Analysis (SDGA) for the remainder of this report.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Burns, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a method utilizing drum headspace VOC concentration as a waste characterization tool

Description: Pretest waste characterization for the bin-scale tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) required sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from within transuranic (TRU) waste drums. Although the bin-scale tests have been postponed, the development and demonstration of accurate waste characterization methods continues. The objectives of extensive sampling of waste drums are to obtain a representative sample from each layer of confinement to identify volatile and gaseous constituents, verify process knowledge of the drum contents, and demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. A method to estimate the VOC concentration between layers of confinement from a single headspace sample collected beneath the drum filter of a vented waste drum is investigated. This method of characterizing the void space within a drum could eventually lead to a significant reduction in sampling time and cost. A model based on fundamental principles of transport phenomena is developed to estimate the VOC concentration throughout a waste drum based on the knowledge of the transport properties and the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model and experimental results are compared.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C. & Connolly, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department