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Proton Polarimetry at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

Description: The RHIC polarized proton collider employs polarimeters in each of the Blue and Yellow rings that utilize the analyzing power in p-Carbon elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference region to measure the absolute beam polarization. These are calibrated by the polarized Hydrogen Jet Target that measures the absolute beam polarization in pp elastic scattering in the CNI region. This paper describes the status and performance of these polarimeters in the FY09 run which included both a 250 GeV/c and 100 GeV/c physics data taking periods. We will describe some of the difficulties encountered and the efforts underway to improve the performance in better energy resolution, rate handling capability, and reduced systematic uncertainties.
Date: September 7, 2009
Creator: Makdisi, Y.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quench propagation in the HOM damper of the 56 MHz cavity

Description: The aim of this report is to summarize a study of the propagation of a quench in a HOM damper probe of the 56 MHz superconducting storage cavity for RHIC and provide guidance for machine protection. The 56 MHz cavity [1] is designed to operate as a beam-driven superconducting quarter-wave resonator in the RHIC ring. Four Higher Order Mode (HOM) dampers [2] are used to prevent beam instabilities [3] in RHIC. These are inserted in the back wall of the cavity (the high magnetic field region) through ports that also serve for rinsing the cavity with high-pressure deionized water as well as the fundamental power coupler and pick-up ports. Figure 1 shows the outline of the cavity [4,5]. The HOM damper probe has a magnetic coupling loop which penetrates the cavity as shown in Figure 2 [5]. The loop is cooled by conduction to the 4.3K helium system, thus any sudden, significant amount of heat dumped on the loop will cause local heating. The peak magnetic field on the loop can reach about 7.4 x 10{sup 4} amperes per meter at a cavity voltage of 2.5 MV [5]. The scenario we present here is that a small region on the loop quenches. We can calculate the current driving the cavity using the RHIC parameters and get the magnetic field as a function of the current, the cavity's intrinsic Q and detuning parameter, however it turns out that within the time relevant for the quench development (a fraction of a second) the cavity field does not change sufficiently to warrant this extra computation. Thus we can assume that the field over the loop is constant. The damper loop dimensions are not so important, however its cross section is. In the following we assume that the loop's cross-section is 2 cm by ...
Date: August 1, 2009
Creator: Ben-Zvi,I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser plasma in a magnetic field

Description: Laser Ion Source (LIS) is a candidate among various heavy ion sources. A high density plasma produced by Nd:YAG laser with drift velocity realizes high current and high charge state ion beams. In order to obtain higher charged particle ions, we had test experiments of LIS with a magnetic field by which a connement effect can make higher charged beams. We measured total current by Faraday Cup (FC) and analyzed charge distribution by Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA). It is shown that the ion beam charge state is higher by a permanent magnet.
Date: September 20, 2009
Creator: Kondo,K.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.; Dabrowski, R. & Okamura, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LHeC and eRHIC

Description: This paper is focused on possible designs and predicted performances of two proposed high-energy, high-luminosity electron-hadron colliders: eRHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at Organisation Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire (CERN, Geneve, Switzerland). The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC, BNL) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, CERN) are designed as versatile colliders. RHIC is colliding various species of hadrons staring from polarized protons to un-polarized heavy ions (such as fully stripped Au (gold) ions) in various combinations: polarized p-p, d-Au, Cu-Cu, Au-Au. Maximum energy in RHIC is 250 GeV (per beam) for polarized protons and 100 GeV/n for heavy ions. There is planed expansion of the variety of species to include polarized He{sup 3} and unpolarized fully stripped U (uranium). LHeC is designed to collide both un-polarized protons with energy up to 7 TeV per beam and fully stripped Pb (lead) ions with energy up to 3 TeV/n. Both eRHIC and LHeC plan to add polarized electrons (or/and positrons) to the list of colliding species in these versatile hadron colliders. In eRHIC 10-20 GeV electrons would collide with hadrons circulating in RHIC. In LHeC 50-150 GeV polarized leptons will collided with LHC's hadron beams. Both colliders plan to operate in electron-proton (in RHIC case protons are polarized as well) and electron-ion collider modes. eRHIC and LHeC colliders are complimentary both in the energy reach and in their physics goals. I will discuss in this paper possible choices of the accelerator technology for the electron part of the collider for both eRHIC and LHeC, and will present predicted performance for the colliders. In addition, possible staging scenarios for these colliders will be discussed.
Date: July 16, 2009
Creator: Litvinenko,V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC local orbit control and power supply resolution

Description: Slow global orbit correction at store, running every 30-60 minutes, has been in place since RHIC Run-8. This correction should include tight orbit drift tolerances at the interaction point and collimators, as these are locations where orbit drift of a few hundred microns is observable in backgrounds and luminosity. Future improvements in low beta optics will only lower these tolerances. runfy09 attempts to control the collimator orbit with local three-bumps after global orbit corrections appeared to be limited by corrector power supply resolution. This paper evaluates orbit control in the context of existing corrector power supply resolution, and makes recommendations for planned RHIC operations scenarios.
Date: December 1, 2009
Creator: Satogata, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC low energy beam loss projections

Description: For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x ...
Date: August 1, 2009
Creator: Satogata,T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC low-energy challenges and plans

Description: Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by the search for a possible QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with these challenges during beam tests with gold beams in March 2008. This includes first operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n, first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n, and luminosity projections for near-term operations.
Date: June 8, 2009
Creator: Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

Description: During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.
Date: October 6, 2008
Creator: Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building the RHIC tracking lattice model

Description: In this note we outline the procedure to build a realistic lattice model for the RHIC beam-beam tracking simulation. We will install multipole field errors in the arc main dipoles, arc main quadrupols and interaction region magnets (DX, D0, and triplets) and introduce a residual closed orbit, tune ripples, and physical apertures in the tracking lattice model. Nonlinearities such as local IR multipoles, second order chromaticies and third order resonance driving terms are also corrected before tracking.
Date: January 27, 2010
Creator: Luo, Y.; Fischer, W. & Tepikian, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

Description: Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.
Date: February 25, 2010
Creator: Fischer, W.; Luo, Y. & Montag, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The AGS with four helical magnets

Description: The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.
Date: February 25, 2010
Creator: Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Future BNL plans for a polarized electron-ion collider (eRHIC)

Description: To provide polarized electron-proton collisions of {radical}s = 100 GeV; addition of a 10 GeV electron accelerator to the existing RHIC facility is currently under study. Two design lines are under consideration: a self-polarizing electron ring, and an energy recovery linac. While the latter provides significantly higher luminosities, it is technologically very challenging. We present both design approaches and discuss their advantages and limitations.
Date: July 26, 2009
Creator: Montag,C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

Description: In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.
Date: December 1, 2009
Creator: Blaskiewicz, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Luminosity issues in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run

Description: Several luminosity issues are reviewed. Questions remain, which are stated for further investigation. Some suggestions are made for possible luminosity improvement. There are several factors affecting the luminosity in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run: (1) The highest bunch intensity at RHIC early store (1.5 hour after accramp in this note) in 2009 is 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. In 2008 run, it was 1.42 x 10{sup 11} protons, which gives rise to 30% higher luminosity if other conditions are the same. Yellow ramp efficiency is identified as one of the main problem. Meanwhile, the beam-beam induced loss in about 1 hour into collision accounts actually no less than the ramp. (2) The typical transverse emittance at early store is 13 {pi}{micro}m for bunch intensity of 10{sup 11} protons, but it is 17 {pi}{micro} for 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. The increase of the emittance implies a 30% difference in luminosity if other conditions are the same. The emittance growth with electron cloud below instability threshold may be partially responsible. Meanwhile, the Booster scraping may also be relevant. (3) The luminosity lifetime in 2009 run is significantly lower than that in 2005, 2006, and 2008 runs. At the beam-beam parameter of 0.01, the typical average luminosity lifetime in early store is 10 hours in 2009, and it is 15 hours in previous runs. Given 8 hours of store time, this implies more than 20% of the difference in integrated luminosity. The 0.7 m betastar adopted in 2009 might be relevant, but the evidence is not fully convincing. On the other hand, the continuing RF voltage ramp in store may be of concern. (4) In the last month of the run, the polarization at RHIC early store is declined from 60% to 55%, a 30% reduction in p{sup 4} factor. It ...
Date: August 1, 2009
Creator: Zhang,S. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement and simulation of the RHIC abort kicker longitudinal impedence

Description: In face of the new upgrades for RHIC the longitudinal impedance of the machine plays an important role in setting the threshold for instabilities and the efficacy of some systems. In this paper we describe the measurement of the longitudinal impedance of the abort kicker for RHIC as well as computer simulations of the structure. The impedance measurement was done by the S{sub 21} wire method covering the frequency range from 9 kHz to 2.5 GHz. We observed a sharp resonance peak around 10 MHz and a broader peak around 20 MHz in both, the real and imaginary part, of the Z/n. These two peaks account for a maximum imaginary longitudinal impedance of j15 {Omega}, a value an order of magnitude larger than the estimated value of j0.2 {Omega}, which indicates that the kicker is one of the main sources of longitudinal impedance in the machine. A computer model was constructed for simulations in the CST MWS program. Results for the magnet input and the also the beam impedance are compared to the measurements. A more detail study of the system properties and possible changes to reduce the coupling impedance are presented.
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Abreu, N. P.; Hahn, H. & Choi, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ERHIC Conceptual Design

Description: The conceptual design of the high luminosity electron-ion collider, eRHIC, is presented. The goal of eRHIC is to provide collisions of electrons (and possibly positrons) with ions and protons at the center-of-mass energy range from 25 to 140 GeV, and with luminosities exceeding 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A considerable part of the physics program is based on polarized electrons, protons and He3 ions with high degree of polarization. In eRHIC electron beam will be accelerated in an energy recovery linac. Major R&D items for eRHIC include the development of a high intensity polarized electron source, studies of various aspects of energy recovery technology for high power beams and the development of compact magnets for recirculating passes. In eRHIC scheme the beam-beam interaction has several specific features, which have to be thoroughly studied. In order to maximize the collider luminosity, several upgrades of the existing RHIC accelerator are required. Those upgrades may include the increase of intensity as well as transverse and longitudinal cooling of ion and proton beams.
Date: August 25, 2008
Creator: Ptitsyn,V.; Beebe-Wang,J.; Ben-Zvi,I.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Hao, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design study of primary ion provider for RHIC-EBIS

Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed the new pre-injector system, Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.
Date: September 20, 2009
Creator: Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J. & Okamura, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Suppression of shot noise and spontaneous radiation in electron beams

Description: Shot noise in the electron beam distribution is the main source of noise in high-gain FEL amplifiers, which may affect applications ranging from single- and multi-stage HGHG FELs to an FEL amplifier for coherent electron cooling. This noise also imposes a fundamental limit of about 10{sup 6} on FEL gain, after which SASE FELs saturate. There are several advantages in strongly suppressing this shot noise in the electron beam, and the corresponding spontaneous radiation. For more than a half-century, a traditional passive method has been used successfully in practical low-energy microwave electronic devices to suppress shot noise. Recently, it was proposed for this purpose in FELs. However, being passive, the method has some significant limitations and is hardly suitable for the highly inhomogeneous beams of modern high-gain FELs. I present a novel active method of suppressing, by many orders-of-magnitude, the shot noise in relativistic electron beams. I give a theoretical description of the process, and detail its fundamental limitation.
Date: August 23, 2009
Creator: Litvinenko,V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Space charge effect in isochronous rings

Description: Cyclotrons, rings for precise nuclear mass spectrometry, and some light sources with extremely short bunches are operated or planned to be operated in the isochronous or almost isochronous regime. Also, many hadron synchrotrons run in the isochronous regime for a short period of time during transition crossing. The longitudinal motion is frozen in the isochronous regime that leads to accumulation of the integral of the longitudinal space charge force. In low-gamma hadron machines, this can cause a fast growth of the beam energy spread even at modest beam intensities. Additionally, the transverse component of the space charge effectively modifies the dispersion function and the slip factor shifting the isochronous (transition) point. In this paper, we discuss space charge effects in the isochronous regime and present experimental results obtained in the Small Isochronous Ring, developed at Michigan State University specifically for studies of space charge in the isochronous regime.
Date: August 25, 2008
Creator: Pozdeyev,E.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Marti, F. & York, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase Transition Signature Results from PHENIX

Description: The PHENIX experiment has conducted searches for the QCD critical point with measurements of multiplicity fluctuations, transverse momentum fluctuations, event-by-event kaon-to-pion ratios, elliptic flow, and correlations. Measurements have been made in several collision systems as a function of centrality and transverse momentum. The results do not show significant evidence of critical behavior in the collision systems and energies studied, although several interesting features are discussed.
Date: June 8, 2009
Creator: Mitchell, J.e. & Collaboration, PHENIX
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physics with tagged forward protons at RHIC

Description: The physics reach of the STAR detector at RHIC has been extended to include elastic and inelastic diffraction measurements with tagged forward protons. This program has started at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run.
Date: August 30, 2009
Creator: Yip,K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation with electron cooling

Description: There is a strong interest in heavy-ion RHIC collisions in the energy range below the present RHIC injection energy, which is termed 'low-energy' operation. These collisions will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with RHIC electron cooling at low beam energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvements with electron cooling and various limitations.
Date: June 8, 2009
Creator: Fedotov,A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimizing the beam-beam alignment in an electron lens using bremsstrahlung

Description: Installation of electron lenses for the purpose of head-on beam-beam compensation is foreseen at RHIC. To optimize the relative alignment of the electron lens beam with the circulating proton (or ion) beam, photon detectors will be installed to measure the bremsstrahlung generated by momentum transfer from protons to electrons. We present the detector layout and simulations of the bremsstrahlung signal as function of beam offset and crossing angle.
Date: May 23, 2010
Creator: Montag, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Thieberger, P. & Haug, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department