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Cyclone reburning retrofit-corrosion evaluation

Description: Reduction of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from cyclone-equipped boilers is best accomplished by the application of reburning technology. Reburning process involves injection of a supplementary fuel above the cyclone to create a reducing zone for NO{sub x} removal. Overfire air is introduced above this zone to achieve complete combustion. Since the reburning zone must operate substoichiometrically, tube corrosion due to H{sub 2}S formation within the modified combustion zones can be a potential concern when the reburning fuel is a high-sulfur coal. H{sub 2}S is a corrosive gas and its concentration is an indicator of the tendency for fireside corrosion in fuel-rich combustion systems. This research program was undertaken to assess corrosion resistance of three commercially available alloys (carbon steel, SA210-A1; low-alloy steel, SA213-T22; and stainless steel, SA213-TP304) as well as coated steel alloy (SA213-T2). The surface chromium contents of the alloys ranged from 0 to 30%. Four air-cooled corrosion probes, each containing segments of the selected alloys were constructed. The probes were exposed for up to 1200 hours and at a metal temperature of 850{degrees}F to combustion gases generated by firing a high-sulfur Illinois {number sign}6 coal at conditions simulating coal reburning.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Sarv, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 3, Long term testing at the ECTC

Description: The objective of this task is to demonstrate long term operation of a condensing heat exchanger for coal-fired conditions. A small condensing heat exchanger will be installed at the Environmental Control Technology Center in Barker, New York. It will be installed downstream of the flue gas particulate removal system. The test will determine the amount of wear, if any, on the Teflon{trademark} covered internals of the heat exchanger. Visual inspection and measurements will be obtained for the Teflon{trademark} covered tubes during the test. The material wear study will conducted over a one year calendar period, and the CHX equipment will be operated to the fullest extent allowable.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Schulze, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced emissions control development project. Final report, November 1, 1993--February 29, 1996. Phase I

Description: The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase I activities were primarily directed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emission control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. The AECDP facility consists of an ESP, pulse-jet baghouse, and wet scrubber. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal. In order to successfully apply the results of the program to utility systems, the relationship between the performance of the CEDF/AECDP test equipment and commercial units had to be established. The first step in the verification process was to validate that the flue gas treatment devices - boiler/convection pass simulator, ESP, baghouse, and wet SO{sub 2} scrubber - operate in a manner representative of commercial units.
Date: February 29, 1996
Creator: Farthing, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mercury speciation measurements on a 10 MW{sub e} coal-fired boiler simulator

Description: The current trends towards deregulation of electric utilities, air toxic regulations and stringent fine particulate emissions reflect an increased need for coal-based research. In response, Babcock and Wilcox invested in the state-of-the-art 100 million Btu/hr (10 MW, equivalent) Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) located in Alliance, Ohio. The representative combustion conditions, flow patterns and residence times permit direct scale-up of CEDF test results to commercial boilers and pollution control devices. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Office of Development, B&W is employing the CEDF to conduct a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants from coal-fired boilers. The project specifically targets the control of mercury, the trace element under close scrutiny by the EPA. Due to the various forms of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, accurate mercury speciation measurements are required to develop mercury control strategies. Current uncertainty in the accuracy and mercury speciation capability of mercury sampling methods led B&W to use both EPA Method 29 and the Ontario Hydro procedures to measure mercury emissions from CEDF pollution control devices. A comparison of the speciated mercury emissions is presented.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Evans, A.P. & Nevitt, K.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1--December 31, 1996

Description: Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emission compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emission control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Evans, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

Description: The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Jankura, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solvent recycle/contaminant reduction testing - Phase I, Task 3. Topical progress report, June 1994--December 1994

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. This report describes the solvent recyle test program for EDTA/ammonium carbonate solvent.
Date: July 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler systems. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

Description: This progress report is on the project by Babcock and Wilcox Company to develop an advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler system. The topics of the report include project management, the NO{sub x} subsystem, the SO{sub 2}/particulate/air toxics/solid by-product subsystem, boiler subsystem, balance of plant subsystem, and controls and sensors subsystems.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bench scale testing - Phase I, Task 4. Topical progress report, September 1994--January 1995

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment.
Date: July 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pilot plant study - Phase I, Task 5. Topical report, September 1994--June 1995

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. This report describes the solvents and decontamination of process equipment (uranium removal).
Date: July 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

Description: Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Evans, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Mercury Control

Description: McDermott Technology, Inc. (a subsidiary of Babcock & Wilcox) is conducting the Advanced Emissions Control Development Project (AECDP) which is aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for such controls may arise as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proceeds with implementation of requirements set forth in the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA`s) of 1990. Promulgation of air toxics emissions regulations for electric utility plants could dramatically impact utilities burning coal, their industrial and residential customers, and the coal industry. AECDP project work will supply the information needed by utilities to respond to potential HAPs regulations in a timely, cost-effective, enviromnentally-sound manner which supports the continued use of the Nation`s abundant reserves of coal, such as those in the State of Ohio. The development work is being carried out using the 10 MW Clean Environment Development Facility wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems, (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. This project is supported by the Department of Energy, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development and Babcock & Wilcox. A comprehensive assessment of HAP emissions from coal-fired electric utility boilers sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute concluded that with the exception of selenium and mercury, the majority of trace elements are well controlled due to their association ...
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Evans, A. P.; Redinger, K. W. & Holmes, M. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler systems. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

Description: The paper describes the following subsystems and gives a summary of activities and key accomplishments relating to each: the NO{sub x} subsystem; SO{sub 2}/particulate/air toxics/solid by-product subsystem; the boiler system; balance of the plant subsystem; and the controls and sensors subsystem. Project management activities are also described.
Date: July 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent Phase I. Final report, September 1993--June 1995

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment.
Date: October 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chelant screening and refinement tests - Phase I, Task 2. Topical progress report, December 1993--June 1994

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. This report describes efforts towards evaluating solvents for the decontamination of metals and removal of uranium.
Date: July 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}8, July 1--September 30, 1996

Description: The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in Babcock and Wilcox`s state-of-the-art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; and establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Evans, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler systems. Fourth quarterly report, 1996

Description: The goal of the NO{sub x} Subsystem is to achieve continuous operation of the Low Emissions Boiler System (LEBS) at NO{sub x} emissions at or below 0. 20 lb/MBtu through combustion techniques only, with a further target of 0.1 lb NO{sub x}/MBtu using supplementary advanced flue gas cleanup technologies if necessary. These goals places practical constraints that must be considered on the NO{sub x} Subsystem design. Not only must the boiler be designed to achieve time temperature mixing histories that minimize NO{sub x}, but it must also be designed to operate that way throughout its working lifetime. Therefore, NO{sub x} minimization strategies must be integrated into the control systems for every boiler component from the pulverizers to the stack. Furthermore, these goals must be met without increases in carbon loss and CO emissions from the levels achieved with current low-NO{sub x} combustion systems. Therefore, the NO{sub x} Subsystem requires not only sound mechanical designs of burners, furnace surface, and staging air/fuel injectors, but also sensors and software to allow control of their operation. Through engineering analysis, experimental testing, and numerical modeling in Phase 2, an advanced low NO{sub x} control system is being developed. The progress of these activities is presented in this report.
Date: February 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I final report appendices, November 1, 1993--February 29, 1996

Description: Appendices are presented on the Advanced Emissions Control Development Project on the following: wet scrubber sampling and analysis; DBA/lime chemical analysis; limestone forced oxidation chemical analysis; benchmarking on baghouse conditions, electrostatic precipitators, and wet scrubber conditions.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Farthing, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a long-term post-closure radiation monitor: Phase 2, Topical report, March 1994--July 1995

Description: The long-term monitoring of a hazardous waste site for migration of radionuclides requires installation of radiation sensors at a large number of subsurface locations. The concept under development employs a passive in-ground measurement probe which contains a scintillator coupled to an optical lightguide. The overall goal of the Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitor System (LPRMS) development program is to configure a long-term radiation monitor using commercially available, demonstrated components to the largest extent possible. The development program is planned as a three phase program spanning a total time of 53 months. The problems to be solved during Phase 1 were primarily those associated with selection of the most appropriate components (scintillator, coupling optics, optical fiber, and opto-electronics) to maximize the signal reaching the detectors and thereby minimizing the integration time required to obtain a reliable measure of radiation. Phase 2 (the current Phase) encompassed the fabrication and testing of the prototype LPRMS probe at a contaminated DOE site, the Fernald Environmental Management Project, in southwestern Ohio. Uranium isotopes are the primary contaminants of concern at this site. The single probe and opto-electronic device were used to made measurements in-situ at relatively shallow subsurface depths. The end objective of Phase 2 was the design of a full-scale prototype system which incorporates all the features expected to be necessary on a commercial system, including 50 meter depth of measurement, multiplexing of multiple probes, and remote transmission of data. This full-scale prototype will be fabricated and field tested for 12 months during Phase 3, and a commercial design will be developed based upon the data gathered and experience gained during the entire program.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Reed, S.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Preliminary test plan for Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

Description: The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants -- while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of addressing the emission of S0{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The Task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variables than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The data from these tests greatly expands the IFGT performance database for coals and is needed for the technology to progress from the component engineering phase to system integration and commercialization. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides a preliminary test plan for all of the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Jankura, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

Description: Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.
Date: December 23, 1994
Creator: Amrhein, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO sub x Cell trademark Burner retrofit

Description: The Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner operates on the principle of staged combustion. The lower burner of each two-nozzle cell is modified to accommodate all the fuel input previously handled by two nozzles. Secondary air, less than theoretically required for complete combustion, is introduced to the lower burner. The remainder of secondary air is directed to the upper port'' of each cell to complete the combustion process. B W/EPRI have thoroughly tested the LNCB{trademark} at two pilot scales (6 million Btu per hour and 100 million Btu per hour), and tested a single full-scale burner in a utility boiler. Combustion tests at two scales have confirmed NO{sub x} reduction with the low-NO{sub x} cell on the order of 50% relative to the standard cell burner at optimum operating conditions. The technology is now ready for full unit, full-scale demonstration.
Date: May 11, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Full-Scale Demonstration Low-NO[sub x] Cell[trademark] Burner retrofit

Description: The LNCB[trademark] project involves retrofitting the two-nozzle cell burners at Dayton Power Light's, 605 HWe J.M. Stuart Unit [number sign]4 Boiler near Aberdeen, Ohio with LNCB[trademark] (a burner and intregal NOx port). Previous pilot-scale tests have shown such an arrangement to achieve 50% reduction in NOx emission levels. This full-scale project will determine the commercial applicability of this technology. Fabrication and installation of all materials for the burner inversion and impeller change was completed during this quarter. The outage work, which began April 27th and concluded with the unit returning on line May 9th, went very smoothly. The parametric testing phase of the project actually began May 14th after correcting test equipment problems. Preliminary results show that the impeller change and burner inversion were successful. The Low NOx Cell[trademark] burners achieved better than 50% NOx reduction and carbon monoxide (CO) inside the lower furnace is less than 1000 ppm.
Date: September 21, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Subsystem selection for advanced low emission boiler system

Description: In 1992 the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) initiated a new program called Combustion 2000. The purpose of the program was to address the design issues facing new and replacement coal-fired power plants. The work presented in this paper was conducted under the low-emission boiler system (LEBS) portion of the program. LEBS major goals are: NO{sub x} - No more than 0.20 lbs per million Btu of fuel input firing bituminous coal; SO{sub x} -- no more than 0.2 lbs of SO{sub 2} per million Btu firing coal with at least 3 lbs of sulfur per million btu; Particulate -- no more than 0.015 lbs per million Btu of fuel input; Waste and Air Toxics -- reduced; and Plant Efficiency -- no less than 38%. Other objectives include reducing waste generation, producing usable by-products, improving ash disposability, and increasing plant thermal efficiency while keeping the cost of electricity comparable to a state-of-the-art plant. The Babcock and Wilcox Company has completed the first year of work toward the development of an advanced low-emission boiler system (LEBS). The results of this work have led to a preliminary engineering design and a plan to address remaining technical uncertainties. This was accomplished by conducting a thorough technical assessment and performing a concept selection analysis. A summary of the results of this work is presented in this paper.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Rodgers, L. W.; Farthing, G. A. & Gorrell, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department