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Reactor Development Program Progress Report: March 1963

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Reactor Development Program during March 1963. Reactor physics, experiments, and safety studies are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Date: April 15, 1963
Creator: Adams, R. M. & Glassner, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor Development Program Progress Report: April 1963

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Reactor Development Program during April 1963. Reactor physics, experiments, and safety studies are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Date: May 15, 1963
Creator: Adams, R. M. & Glassner, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor Development Program Progress Report: May 1966

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Reactor Development Program during May 1966. Reactor physics, experiments, and safety studies are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Date: June 30, 1966
Creator: Adams, R. M. & Glassner, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor Development Program Progress Report: September 1966

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing progress made within the Reactor Development Program for September, 1966. The report includes highlights of the different project activities including plutonium utilization, fast breeder reactors, general reactor technology, advanced systems research, and nuclear safety. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: October 26, 1966
Creator: Adams, R. M. & Glassner, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor Engineering Division Quarterly Report: December 1, 1953 Through March 30, 1954

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory covering the quarterly report from the Reactor Engineering Division. A summary of reactor programs, designs, development, and experiments are presented. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: April 15, 1954
Creator: Argonne National Laboratory. Reactor Engineering Division.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle Accelerator Division Summary Report: April 15, 1958 through October, 1958

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing a summary report of work completed between April and October, 1958. Summaries of the studies conducted and work completed are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Date: February 1959
Creator: Crewe, Albert V.; FitzPatrick, John P. & Manson, David S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle Accelerator Division Summary Report: April Through September 1960

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing a summary report of the Particle Accelerator Division. As stated in the summary, "this report outlines two methods applicable respectively to longhand and computer calculations" (p. 4). This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1960
Creator: Crewe, Albert V.; FitzPatrick, John P.; Foss, Martyn H. & Manson, David S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annual Report for 1963: Metallurgy Division

Description: Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing work conducted by the Metallurgy Division during 1963. Annual experiments, programs, and studies are presented. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1964
Creator: Foote, Frank G.; Chiswik, Haim H. & Macherey, Robert E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of small, fast reactor core designs using lead-based coolant.

Description: A variety of small (100 MWe) fast reactor core designs are developed, these include compact configurations, long-lived (15-year fuel lifetime) cores, and derated, natural circulation designs. Trade studies are described which identify key core design issues for lead-based coolant systems. Performance parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients are compared for lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and sodium-cooled cores of consistent design. The results of these studies indicate that the superior neutron reflection capability of lead alloys reduces the enrichment and burnup swing compared to conventional sodium-cooled systems; however, the discharge fluence is significantly increased. The size requirement for long-lived systems is constrained by reactivity loss considerations, not fuel burnup or fluence limits. The derated lead-alloy cooled natural circulation cores require a core volume roughly eight times greater than conventional compact systems. In general, reactivity coefficients important for passive safety performance are less favorable for the larger, derated configurations.
Date: June 11, 1999
Creator: Cahalan, J. E.; Hill, R. N.; Khalil, H. S. & Wade, D. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.

Description: Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.
Date: August 10, 1999
Creator: Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L. & Stodolsky, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Imprinted spiral structures as neutron polarizers.

Description: Neutron diffraction from magnetic spiral structures is governed by strong selection rules for the polarization of the outgoing beam. When the sample is entirely of one chirality--for instance a right handed spiral--the neutrons diffracted by some Bragg reflections are fully polarized. While the scattering theory has been formulated long ago, attempts to controllably modify the population of left handed and right handed spiral domains in natural magnetic structures (which for instance occur in some rare earth metals) have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, we have been able to imprint helical magnetic structures in La/Fe multilayers (each layer approximately 30 {angstrom} thick) simply by rotating the growing sample in a weak external field (30e). A first estimate is given of the efficiency of these multilayers as polarizers of neutron beams.
Date: October 7, 1998
Creator: Lohstroh, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hybrid options for light-duty vehicles.

Description: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) offer great promise in improving fuel economy. In this paper, we analyze why, how, and by how much vehicle hybridization can reduce energy consumption and improve fuel economy. Our analysis focuses on efficiency gains associated solely with vehicle hybridization. We do not consider such other measures as vehicle weight reduction or air- and tire-resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. The analysis starts with understanding the energy inefficiencies of light-duty vehicles associated with different operation modes in US and Japanese urban and highway driving cycles, with the corresponding energy-saving potentials. The potential for fuel economy gains due to vehicle hybridization can be estimated almost exclusively on the basis of three elements: the reducibility of engine idling operation, the recoverability of braking energy losses, and the capability of improving engine load profiles to gain efficiency associated with specific HEV configurations and control strategies. Specifically, we evaluate the energy efficiencies and fuel economies of a baseline MY97 Corolla-like conventional vehicle (CV), a hypothetical Corolla-based minimal hybrid vehicle (MHV), and a MY98 Prius-like full hybrid vehicle (FHV). We then estimate energy benefits of both MHVs and FHVs over CVs on a performance-equivalent basis. We conclude that the energy benefits of hybridization vary not only with test cycles, but also with performance requirements. The hybrid benefits are greater for ''Corolla (high) performance-equivalent'' vehicles than for ''Prius (low) performance-equivalent'' vehicles. An increasing acceleration requirement would result in larger fuel economy benefits from vehicle hybridization.
Date: July 19, 1999
Creator: An, F., Stodolsky, F. & Santini, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a high-power lithium-ion battery.

Description: Safety is a key concern for a high-power energy storage system such as will be required in a hybrid vehicle. Present lithium-ion technology, which uses a carbon/graphite negative electrode, lacks inherent safety for two main reasons: (1) carbon/graphite intercalates lithium at near lithium potential, and (2) there is no end-of-charge indicator in the voltage profile that can signal the onset of catastrophic oxygen evolution from the cathode (LiCoO{sub 2}). Our approach to solving these safety/life problems is to replace the graphite/carbon negative electrode with an electrode that exhibits stronger two-phase behavior further away from lithium potential, such as Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. Cycle-life and pulse-power capability data are presented in accordance with the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) test procedures, as well as a full-scale design based on a spreadsheet model.
Date: September 2, 1998
Creator: Jansen, A. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermodynamic and nonstoichiometric behavior of the GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system.

Description: Electromotive force (EMF) measurements of oxygen fugacities as a function of stoichiometry have been made on the GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system in the temperature range {approximately}400-600 C by means of an oxygen titration technique with an yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. Equations for the variation of oxygen partial pressure with composition and temperature have been derived from our EMF measurements. The shape of the 400 C isotherms as a function of oxygen stoichiometry for the Gd and Nd cuprate systems suggests the presence of miscibility gaps at values of x that are higher than those in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} system. For a given oxygen stoichiometry, oxygen partial pressures above Gd-123 and Nd-123 cuprate systems are higher (above x = 6.5) than that for the Y-123 system. A thermodynamic assessment and intercomparison of our partial pressure measurements with the results of related measurements will be presented.
Date: September 29, 1998
Creator: Tetenbaum, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BWR drywell behavior under steam blowdown.

Description: Historically, thermal hydraulics analyses on Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) have been focused on the transients within the reactor or steam generator. Few have studied the effects of steam blowdown on the containment building. This paper discusses some theoretical issues as well as presenting numerical and experimental results of the blowdown tests performed at the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integrated Test Assembly (PUMA).
Date: May 8, 1998
Creator: NguyenLe, Q.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Techniques for inelastic x-ray scattering with {mu}eV resolution.

Description: We introduce a novel type of spectrometer that provides a {micro}eV bandpass together with a tunability over a few meV. The technique relies on nuclear resonant scattering (Moessbauer effect) of synchrotrons radiation at the 14.4-keV resonance of {sup 57}Fe. Energy tuning is achieved by the Doppler effect in high speed rotary motion. The resonantly scattered monochromatic radiation is extracted by a polarization filtering technique or by spatial separation due to the ''nuclear lighthouse effect''.
Date: October 23, 1998
Creator: Rohlsberger, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lithium-endohedral C{sub 60} complexes.

Description: High capacity, reversible, lithium intercalated carbon anodes have been prepared, 855 m.Ah/g, which exceed the capacity for stage 1 lithium intercalated carbon anodes, 372 mAh/g. Since there is very little hydrogen content in the high capacity anode, the fullerene C{sub 60} lattice is used to investigate the nature of lithium ion bonding and spacing between lithiums in endohedral lithium complexes of C{sub 60}. Three lithium-endohedral complexes have been investigated using ab initio molecular orbital calculations involving 2,3 and 5 lithium. The calculated results suggest that lithium cluster formation may be important for achieving the high capacity lithium carbon anodes.
Date: May 4, 1998
Creator: Scanlon, L. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diffusion in phase space

Description: In order to study diffusion in any region of phase space containing nested closed curves we choose action-angle variables, {gamma}, J. the action J labels each closed phase curve and is equal to its area divided by 2{pi}. We can introduce rectangular variables Q,P by the equations Q=(2J){sup 1/2}sin{gamma}, P=(2J){sup 1/2}cos{gamma}, where the angle variable {gamma} is measured clockwise from the P-axis. The phase curves are circles in the Q,P plane with radius (2J){sup 1/2}. We assume that the motion consists of a Hamiltonian motion along a curve of fixed J (in the original coordinate system and in the system Q,P) plus a diffusion and a damping which can change the value of J. Now consider a system of particles described by a density {rho}(J,t), so that the number of particles between the curves J and J+dJ is dN={rho}(J,t)dJ. These cN particles are distributed uniformly in the phase space between the curves J and J+dJ.
Date: April 5, 1993
Creator: Symon, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructural development in waste form alloys cast from irradiated cladding residual from the electrometallurgical treatment of EBR-II spent fuel.

Description: A metallic waste form alloy that consists primarily of stainless steel and zirconium is being developed by Argonne National Laboratory to contain metallic waste constituents that are residual from an electrometallurgical treatment process for spent nuclear fuel. Ingots have been cast in an induction furnace in a hot cell using actual, leftover, irradiated, EBR-II cladding hulls treated in an electrorefiner. The as-cast ingots have been sampled using a core-drilling and an injection-casting technique. In turn, generated samples have been characterized using chemical analysis techniques and a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive and wavelength-dispersive spectrometers. As-cast ingots contain the predicted concentration levels of the various constituents, and most of the phases that develop are analogous to those for alloys generated using non-radioactive surrogates for the various fission products.
Date: June 10, 1999
Creator: Keiser, D. D., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal management concepts for higher efficiency heavy vehicles.

Description: Thermal management is a cross-cutting technology that directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, aerodynamics, driver/passenger comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and component life. This review paper provides an assessment of thermal management for large trucks, particularly as it impacts these features. Observations arrived at from a review of the state of the art for thermal management for over-the-road trucks are highlighted and commented on. Trends in the large truck industry, pertinent engine truck design and performance objectives, and the implications of these relative to thermal management, are presented. Finally, new thermal management concepts for high efficiency vehicles are described.
Date: May 19, 1999
Creator: Wambsganss, M. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of an Advanced Photon Source linac beam position monitor used for positron position measurement of a beam containing both positrons and electrons.

Description: The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac beam position monitors can be used to monitor the position of a positron beam also containing electrons. To accomplish this task, both the signal at the bunching frequency of 2856 MHz and the signal at 2 x 2856 MHz are acquired and processed for each stripline. The positron beam position is obtained by forming a linear combination of both 2856- and 5712-MHz signals for each stripline and then performing the standard difference over sum computation. The required linear combination of the 2856- and 5712-MHz signals depends on the electrical calibration of each stripline/cable combination. In this paper, the calibration constants for both 2856-MHz and 5712-MHz signals for each stripline are determined using a pure beam of electrons. The calibration constants are obtained by measuring the 2856- and 5712-MHz stripline signals at various electron beam currents and positions. Finally, the calibration constants measured using electrons are used to determine positron beam position for the mixed beam case.
Date: May 19, 1998
Creator: Sereno, N. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department