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DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the previous quarter. Efforts this quarter have focused on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The delivery date for five critical parts from one supplier has slipped to late November, which will preclude deployment for a field test before late December or early January. We are exploring whether we can take the partially made parts and complete them earlier in our own shop.
Date: September 30, 2006
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the Phase II final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006. Efforts the current quarter have continued to focus on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The continued extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components significantly delayed the deployment of the prototype and precommercial units. All parts have now been received for two units, and all but one for the third. Mechanical assembly of the first two systems is complete and the electronics installation and laboratory testing will be finished in April. We have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with a major US oilfield equipment supplier, which calls for their assisting with our field tests, in cash and in kind. We are close to signing a definitive agreement which includes the purchase of the three precommercial units. We had also signed a CRADA with the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC), and scheduled a test at their site, The RMOTC drilling schedule continues to slip, and the test cannot begin until the first week of May. ...
Date: March 31, 2007
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with ...
Date: September 30, 2007
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

Description: A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.
Date: November 28, 2006
Creator: Turner, Bill
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fluid-Rock Characterization for NMR Well Logging and Special Core Analysis

Description: The overall objective of this effort is to develop, build and test a high-speed drilling motor that can meet the performance guidelines of the announcement, namely: 'The motors are expected to rotate at a minimum of 10,000 rpm, have an OD no larger than 7 inches and work downhole continuously for at least 100 hours. The motor must have common oilfield thread connections capable of making up to a drill bit and bottomhole assembly. The motor must be capable of transmitting drilling fluid through the motor'. To these goals, APS would add that the motor must be economically viable, in terms of both its manufacturing and maintenance costs, and be applicable to as broad a range of markets as possible. APS has taken the approach of using a system using planetary gears to increase the speed of a conventional mud motor to 10,000 rpm. The mud flow is directed around the outside of the gear train, and a unique flow diversion system has been employed. A prototype of the motor was built and tested in APS's high-pressure flow loop. The motor operated per the model up to {approx}4200 rpm. At that point a bearing seized and the performance was severely degraded. The motor is being rebuilt and will be retested outside of this program.
Date: December 31, 2007
Creator: Hirasaki, George & Mohanty, Kishore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006. The month of January was devoted to the final preparations for, and conducting of testing of the DVMCS at TerraTek laboratories in Salt Lake City. This testing was concluded on January 27, 2006. Much of the effort in this period was then devoted to the analysis of the data and the preparation of the Phase II final report. The report was issued after the close of the period. Work on Phase III of the project began during this quarter. It has consisted of making some modifications in the prototype design to make it more suitable for field testing an more practical for commercial use. This work is continuing. The redesign effort, coupled with the current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The precommercial prototypes are being developed in parallel, so the project should be completed per the current schedule.
Date: May 1, 2006
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the testing of the rebuilt laboratory prototype and its conversion into a version that will be operable in the drilling tests at TerraTek Laboratories. In addition, formations for use in these tests were designed and constructed, and a test protocol was developed. The change in scope and no-cost extension of Phase II to January, 2006, described in our last report, were approved. The tests are scheduled to be run during the week of January 23, and should be completed before the end of the month.
Date: January 17, 2006
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the Jan-March report1. Most of the components have been received and assembly was nearly complete at the end of the period. Testing started in October and results will be submitted in the next report. The field testing component of this Phase has been rethought. The current plan is to adapt the laboratory prototype for use in a drilling laboratory and run a series of controlled drilling tests with and without the DVMCS. This should give a more quantitative evaluation of its value, which will help us sign a commercialization partner. While this testing is underway, we will order and begin machining parts for full field prototypes to be use in Phase III. A modification application is being submitted in October to reflect these changes.
Date: October 31, 2005
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The purpose of this program is to develop the Drilling Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) to both record and reduce drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drill string. It is composed of two main elements. The first is a multi-axis active vibration damper to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations, and thereby increase both rate of penetration (ROP) and bit life, as well that the life of other drillstring components. The hydraulic impedance (hardness) of this damper will be continuously adjusted using unique technology that is robust, fast-acting and reliable. The second component is a real-time system to monitor 3-axis drillstring vibration, and related parameters including weight- and torque-on-bit (TOB) and temperature. This monitor will determine the current vibration environment and adjust the damper accordingly. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. Phase I of this program addresses an evaluation of the environment in which the DVMCS will operate; modeling of a drillstring response including the active damper; a top-level design of the mechanical and electronic systems; analyzing the anticipated performance of the damper by modeling and laboratory testing of small prototypes; and doing preliminary economic, market, environmental and financing analyses. This phase is scheduled to last fourteen months, until November 30, 2003. During this first quarter, significant progress was achieved on the first two objectives, and work was begun on several others. Initial designs of the DVMCS are underway.
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the last report. Most of the components have been received and assembly has begun. Testing is expected to resume in August. In April, a paper was presented at the American Association of Drilling Engineers National Technical Conference in Houston. The paper was well received, and several oilfield service and supply companies sent inquiries regarding commercial distribution of the system. These are currently being pursued, but none have yet been finalized.
Date: July 27, 2005
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The project continues to advance approximately per the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. Work has begun on designing the test equipment for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5.) One of the intents of this project is to not only dampen vibration above the damper, but to also dampen vibrations below the damper. This is accomplished by smoothing out the discontinuities as the bit drills ahead. The model has the capability to simulate the drilling looking at the depth of cut along the discontinuities. It can also look at the amount of time that the bit is in contact with the formation. It is found that under some conditions the vibrations increased the discontinuities due to resonant conditions. In the ideal situation, the damper reduces the discontinuities and smooths out the drilling. APS looked at a wide range of spring stiffness and damping properties to determine the optimum damper. Spring rates of 10,000 lb/in to 60,000 lbs/in were analyzed. The best compromise is at 30,000 lb/in for the 6 3/4 inch tool. Low spring rates would require large displacements for the damper, while stiff springs do not provide enough motion for the damper. Several damping concepts were analyzed: (1) The first thought was to have a damper providing high damping in the upward direction and low damping in the downward direction. It was found that this increased the vibration by wallowing out the troughs of the discontinuities leading to increased displacements at the bit. (2) Another method investigated was having increased damping at high acceleration levels and less damping at lower acceleration levels. This gave improved results. (3) Constant damping so far provides the damping situation. With the proper damping level the damper can smooth out the discontinuities and provide smooth ...
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: Testing of the prototype valve began during this quarter. The objective of the first preliminary tests was to determine the pressure drop that can be created across the valve under different conditions of flow and pressure. As described in Quarterly Report 3, the system uses pneumatic pressure to activate a cylinder which in turn loads two hydraulic cylinders containing the MR fluid. Testing was preformed with no sensors or gauges other than the air pressure supply gauge. The valve was powered at 36 volts and drew about 3.5 amps. The valve held back the MR fluid at 30 psi. (This is the air pressure required to get the cylinders to move without any flow obstruction.) The air pressure was then increased gradually until the valve could no longer hold back the MR pressure and the cylinders moved slowly. The maximum air pressure that could be held without movement of the cylinders was 85 psi; however. as much as 30 psi of this pressure may be required to overcome stiction. Thus, the maximum pressure we were able to stop was somewhere between 55 and 85 psi of air. This translates into 1500 to 2330 psi MR fluid pressure. Based on the ratio of the piston area to that of the MR damper valve, this in turn translates to a force of 9,700 to 15,000 pounds. A force of this magnitude is what is required for operation of the damper under typical downhole conditions. Initial testing indicates that a valve capable of producing the required damping under the anticipated downhole conditions is technically feasible. The project is progressing, but behind schedule, and a four-month extension of Phase I is being requested. This extension will not alter the budget for Phase I and is expected to have no significant effect upon the overall ...
Date: October 30, 2003
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Phase II began on June 1, and the first month's effort were reported in the seventh quarterly report on the project.1 The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. The redesign and upgrade of the laboratory prototype was completed on schedule during this period, and assembly was complete at the end of this period. Testing will begin during the first week of October. This aspect of the project is thus approximately six weeks behind schedule. Design of the field prototype is progressing per schedule.
Date: October 29, 2004
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. As a result of the lower than expected performance of the MR damper noted last quarter, several additional tests were conducted. These dealt with possible causes of the lack of dynamic range observed in the testing: additional damping from the oil in the Belleville springs; changes in properties of the MR fluid; and, residual magnetization of the valve components. Of these, only the last was found to be significant. By using a laboratory demagnetization apparatus between runs, a dynamic range of 10:1 was achieved for the damper, more than adequate to produce the needed improvements in drilling. Additional modeling was also performed to identify a method of increasing the magnetic field in the damper. As a result of the above, several changes were made in the design. Additional circuitry was added to demagnetize the valve as the field is lowered. The valve was located to above the Belleville springs to reduce the load placed upon it and offer a greater range of materials for its construction. In addition, to further increase the field strength, the coils were relocated from the mandrel to the outer housing. At the end of the quarter, the redesign ...
Date: April 27, 2005
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed. The month of June, 2004 was primarily occupied with the writing of the Phase I Final Report, the sole deliverable of Phase I, which will be submitted in the next quarter. Redesign of the ...
Date: October 13, 2004
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. The redesign and upgrade of the laboratory prototype was completed on schedule and it was assembled during the last period. Testing was begin during the first week of October. Initial results indicated that the dynamic range of the damping was less than predicted and that the maximum damping was also less than required. A number of possible explanations for these results were posited, and test equipment was acquired to evaluate the various hypotheses. Testing was just underway at the end of this period.
Date: January 28, 2005
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.
Date: August 31, 2004
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program entails modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. The project continues to advance, but is behind the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. The test bench for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5) and the laboratory prototype were constructed by the end of the period. During assembly, however, several of the key subassemblies became galled together, and had to be cut apart. These parts are being remachined with harder surfaces to prevent recurrence of this problem. One key component, the MR damper mandrel, has been redesigned into a three-piece assembly which will facilitate assembly and reduce the cost of replacement of worn components. The remade parts will be delivered by April 19, and the prototype assembled. Testing will begin during the first week of May and is anticipated to be completed before the revised end date for Phase I, May 31, 2004.
Date: April 17, 2004
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

Description: The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program entails modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. The project continues to advance, but is behind the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. The test bench for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5) has been designed and constructed. The design of the full-scale laboratory prototype and associated test equipment is complete and the components are out for manufacture. Barring any unforeseen difficulties, laboratory testing should be complete by the end of March, as currently scheduled. We anticipate the expenses through March to be approximately equal to those budgeted for Phase I.
Date: January 9, 2004
Creator: Cobern, Martin E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department