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Report of the CIRRPC Ad Hoc Planning Group

Description: A variety of vehicles have been used to try to ensure a coordinated Federal approach to the complex issues surrounding the utilization of and exposure to radiation. Subsequently, various committees were convened to seek improvements in coordination of Federal radiation research programs and in addressing policy matters. In 1984, the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) was established. CIRRPC is charged with acting as a coordinator, clearinghouse, and evaluator of Federal research effort on designated research projects and coordinating radiation policy between agencies, resolving policy conflicts and advising of the formulation of broad radiation policy; to the extent that these actions complement the research and policy activities of member agencies. The present report is a follow-up to the CIRRPC Retreat of July 21, 1988.
Date: December 1, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chloride content of dissolver solution from Rocky Flats alloy thirteenth campaign following head end treatment

Description: F-Canyon continues to obtain good chloride removal from Rocky Flats Alloy solution during head end treatment. One single batch of solution from the thirteenth alloy campaign, dissolved earlier this month, has been successfully processed. This was the first campaign to combine Rocky Flats Scrub Alloy (RFSA) with Rocky Flats Anode Heel Alloy (RFAHA) in the same dissolution solution (TA-2-1183). Following dissolution in Tank 6.4D, chloride was precipitated with mercurous ion added as the nitrate. The precipitate, Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, was concurrently removed with the gelatin floc via centrifugation. For this batch, a set of duplicate samples was initially obtained from Tank 11.2. However, due to repeated acid and density measurements by Laboratories, the volume of sample remaining was insufficient to permit chloride analysis. Samples of the same solution, now transferred to Tank 13.3, were analyzed. During the transfer, a 2% dilution occurred, but this error is not significant due to the larger error in the chloride analysis. For the single batch of RFSA-RFAHA material processed from the thirteenth campaign, the head end product contained 52 ppm ({micro}g/mL) chloride, a DF of 22. Relative standard deviation of the measurement was {+-}6 ppm (n = 4) for a precision of {+-}12%.
Date: September 20, 1988
Creator: Holcomb, H. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of a third-integral resonance

Description: In preparation for the Aladdin experiments, I will give an analytic treatment of a third-integral resonance. By starting from the equations for an actual ring, we can then connect the analytic parameters with the real ring.
Date: August 1, 1988
Creator: Symon, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chloride content of Rocky Flats scrub alloy eleventh campaign solution following head end treatment

Description: A single batch of dissolver solution from the eleventh Rocky Flats Scrub Alloy (RFSA) campaign has been analyzed for chloride content following head end treatment to reduce its concentration. Scrub alloy buttons were dissolved in Tank 6.4D during May. In subsequent head end processing, chloride was precipitated with mercurous ion added as the nitrate. The precipitate, Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, was concurrently removed with the gelatin floc via centrifugation. Duplicate samples from Tank 11.2, containing the head end product, produced excellent agreement between their density measurements, acid analyses, and gross alpha activities, indicating them to be truly representative of the tank`s contents. Duplicate aliquots from each of these solutions were analyzed using the turbidimetric chloride method developed in the Separations Technology Laboratory. These resulted in an average chloride value of 41 ppm ({micro}g/mL) chloride for the head end product. Relative standard deviation of the measurement was {+-}4 ppm (n = 4), a precision of {+-}10%. Such a variance is normal at this low chloride level. Since initial chloride values prior to head end averaged 1455 ppm (0.041M), as analyzed by Laboratories Department, a chloride DF of approximately 35 was obtained. Such a reduced chloride level (to less than 100 ppm) in the treated solution will permit further canyon processing with minimal corrosion.
Date: June 30, 1988
Creator: Holcomb, H. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of monitoring wells exhibiting elevated pH in F and H Area

Description: Several of the monitoring wells installed at the Savannah River Plant in the past few years exhibit pH values of 8 or higher. These pHs are significantly higher than average values for the aquifers involved and are also higher than expected for natural waters. They are also inconsistent with observations in nearby wells. It is therefore suspected that the high pHs are not representative of true aquifer conditions. Two previous studies conducted at SRP (Price, 1984; Schreeder, 1986) conclude that high pH readings in M-Area monitoring wells and Z-Area piezometers are the result of contact between groundwater and grout. Price bases his conclusion on water chemistry. Schreeder`s evidence is the relationship between pH and amount of water withdrawn from the piezometers--an initially high pH drops as more water is removed. This conclusion is supported by laboratory measurements on water samples collected from cement-bentonite grout which show pH values of 13. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate contamination by grout and drilling fluid as a possible cause of elevated pH in monitoring wells at SRP and to develop techniques to rehabilitate the affected wells. FSB and HSB wells were used in this study.
Date: July 1988
Creator: Blackmer, G. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Higher harmonic RF system for APS

Description: The influence of a higher harmonic rf system was considered previously but was treated as a non-accelerating system. This note treats the higher harmonic system more generally and treats the non-linera synchrotron oscillations without the use of a power series expansion.
Date: November 1, 1988
Creator: Kramer, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

Description: This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.
Date: July 1, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solids formation on filtrate neutralization

Description: The Separations Technology Laboratory was requested to study what happens when a filtrate solution, which will be a F B-Line product, is neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The primary concern was the formation of solids that could cause damage in pump seals, resulting in their failure. The results of these experiments indicate that under process conditions, granular, crystalline sodium fluoride will be produced by rapid neutralization of the filtrate solution with 50% NaOH plus a 25 volume percent excess. Postprecipitation of sodium oxalate-sodium fluoride and its accumulation can occur over a three-week storage period of the neutralized filtrate. Such solids could pose operational problems from pump seal abrasion and potential failure caused by them.
Date: May 26, 1988
Creator: Holcomb, H.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Distributed discrete event simulation. Final report

Description: The presentation given here is restricted to discrete event simulation. The complexity of and time required for many present and potential discrete simulations exceeds the reasonable capacity of most present serial computers. The desire, then, is to implement the simulations on a parallel machine. However, certain problems arise in an effort to program the simulation on a parallel machine. In one category of methods deadlock care arise and some method is required to either detect deadlock and recover from it or to avoid deadlock through information passing. In the second category of methods, potentially incorrect simulations are allowed to proceed. If the situation is later determined to be incorrect, recovery from the error must be initiated. In either case, computation and information passing are required which would not be required in a serial implementation. The net effect is that the parallel simulation may not be much better than a serial simulation. In an effort to determine alternate approaches, important papers in the area were reviewed. As a part of that review process, each of the papers was summarized. The summary of each paper is presented in this report in the hopes that those doing future work in the area will be able to gain insight that might not otherwise be available, and to aid in deciding which papers would be most beneficial to pursue in more detail. The papers are broken down into categories and then by author. Conclusions reached after examining the papers and other material, such as direct talks with an author, are presented in the last section. Also presented there are some ideas that surfaced late in the research effort. These promise to be of some benefit in limiting information which must be passed between processes and in better understanding the structure of a distributed simulation. Pursuit ...
Date: February 1, 1988
Creator: De Vries, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Bayesian Approach to the Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments

Description: We consider the problem of designing and analyzing experiments for prediction of the function y(f), t {element_of} T, where y is evaluated by means of a computer code (typically by solving complicated equations that model a physical system), and T represents the domain of inputs to the code. We use a Bayesian approach, in which uncertainty about y is represented by a spatial stochastic process (random function); here we restrict attention to stationary Gaussian processes. The posterior mean function can be used as an interpolating function, with uncertainties given by the posterior standard deviations. Instead of completely specifying the prior process, we consider several families of priors, and suggest some cross-validational methods for choosing one that performs relatively well on the function at hand. As a design criterion, we use the expected reduction in the entropy of the random vector y (T*), where T* {contained_in} T is a given finite set of ''sites'' (input configurations) at which predictions are to be made. We describe an exchange algorithm for constructing designs that are optimal with respect to this criterion. To demonstrate the use of these design and analysis methods, several examples are given, including one experiment on a computer model of a thermal energy storage device and another on an integrated circuit simulator.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Currin, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decision Guide for Roof Slope Selection

Description: This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Sharp, T.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Phase I, Final report

Description: This report presents the results of the first phase of a program for the development of a coal-fired residential combustion system. This phase consisted of the design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of an advanced pulse combustor sized for residential space heating requirements. The objective was to develop an advanced pulse coal combustor at the {approximately} 100,000 Btu/hr scale that can be integrated into a packaged space heating system for small residential applications. The strategy for the development effort included the scale down of the feasibility unit from 1-2 MMBtu/hr to 100,000 Btu/hr to establish a baseline for isolating the effect of scale-down and new chamber configurations separately. Initial focus at the residential scale was concentrated on methods of fuel injection and atomization in a bare metal unit. This was followed by incorporating changes to the advanced chamber designs and testing of refractory-lined units. Multi-fuel capability for firing oil or gas as a secondary fuel was also established. Upon completion of the configuration and component testing, an optimum configuration would be selected for integrated testing of the pulse combustor unit. The strategy also defined the use of Dry Ultrafine Coal (DUC) for Phases 1 and 2 of the development program with CWM firing to be a product improvement activity for a later phase of the program.
Date: April 1, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DIII-D experimental plan for FY-1989

Description: This document summarizes the Experimental Plan for the DIII-D tokamak facility for the fiscal year 1989. The long-range DIII-D 5 yr plan is directed ultimately at the goal of achieving good confinement at high beta in a plasma with non-inductively driven current. This is important to the design of a steady-state reactor. This program may be thought of as occurring in two phases. In the first phase of the program we axe separately investigating high beta plasma confinement in inductively-driven plasmas, and non-inductive current drive. In the second phase we will combine these two elements to investigate high beta plasma confinement with non-inductive current drive. The FY 89 plan continues the first phase of the DIII-D experimental effort that contains a strong focus on beta and confinement in non-circular plasma configurations and in the divertor configuration in particular. Important work also continues in the development of rf heating systems for heating, profile control, and current drive. This research is coupled to theoretical efforts at General Atomics. The FY 89 research program outlined herein is diverse and multifaceted. However, it is also characterized by a greater synthesis of techniques toward a common goal. An example is the application of ECH for sawtooth suppression that would improve the low q confinement and allow higher {beta} to be obtained. We believe this research program will provide a solid foundation for the continued development of the tokamak toward high beta steady-state reactor application. The DIII-D FY 89 research program will provide results that will help resolve many CIT and ITER Physics R&D issues. In addition, DIII-D confinement studies will be an important input to the newly formed National Transport Task Force.
Date: November 1, 1988
Creator: Luxon, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Condensed draft action description memorandum for the decontamination and decommissioning of Battelle Columbus facilities

Description: Under provisions of the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), the US Department of Energy, Chicago Operations Office, proposes to provide funding for Surveillance and Maintenance (S & M) and subsequent Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) of fifteen facilities and associated premises belonging to Battelle Columbus Division. The fifteen facilities are contaminated as a result of nuclear research and development activities conducted over a period of approximately 43 years for DOE and its predecessor agencies--the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). The proposed action includes continuation of ongoing S & M as well as a D & D of the facilities. The S & M activities include a continued environmental monitoring program to maintain assurance that radioactive contamination has not escaped to the surrounding environment; regularly scheduled inspection and maintenance of health, safety, and radiation protection equipment and instrumentation; a program of health physics surveillance monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and equipment and instrumentation maintenance and calibration; and emergency planning, training, and drills. The so- called dismantlement D & D mode is the proposed alternative for D & D of these facilities. For the facilities in question this will generally involve dismantlement and/or removal of equipment; decontamination of building structures; and restoration of the buildings. The decontamination will reduce contamination to levels consistent with unrestricted use of the facilities.
Date: July 12, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conceptual design plans for the FY 1993 line items

Description: This Facilities Capability Assurance Program (FCAP) project provides for the design and construction of a reconfigured production facility(ies) for Mound`s non-nuclear weapons components. Existing buildings would be rehabilitated in order to locate final production/assembly areas within close proximity and in a facility suitable to operations of this nature. Ancillary operations will be located in nearby buildings, also rehabilitated, in order to provide support to final production with minimal handling and travel-time. Benefits of this reconfiguration include: reduced labor, space requirements, and product cycle time; maximum flexibility to accommodate new mission assignments without new buildings; restores existing manufacturing facilities to a condition that is conducive to state-of-the-art operations. This project is mound`s top priority project for FY93.
Date: December 22, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comments on the linear transverse coupling

Description: One of the most troublesome phenomena during the commissioning of synchrotrons is the linear horizontal-vertical coupling. Because of its linear nature, on can in principle obtain the analytical solution provided that all sources of skew quadrupole field are known completely in the entire ring. In spite of all this, many standard diagnostic procedures and measurements become rather confusing and often lead to wrong conclusions. The purpose of this note is to explain some of the simpler relation which are useful in understanding measurement of tunes and the amount of coupling.
Date: February 1, 1988
Creator: Ohnuma, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MHTGR-Nuclear Island Engineering: Final summary report for the period November 30, 1987 through December 1, 1988

Description: This report summarizes the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) - Nuclear Island Engineering (NIE) design and development work performed by General Atomics (GA) for the period November 30, 1987 through December 1, 1988, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract AC03-88SF17367. The scope of the report includes work performed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI), Combustion Engineering Inc. (C-E), and James Howden Company, as major subcontractors to GA.
Date: December 1, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A front end design for the advanced photon source

Description: X-ray sources on next generation low emittance/high brilliance synchrotrons such as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS)(1) have unique properties which directly affect the design of the front end of the beam line. The most striking of these are the large peak photon power densities expected for the insertion device (ID) x-ray sources. Undulators, for example, can have highly peaked photon power distributions with central densities approaching 300 kW/mrad{sup 2}. Large power distributions can also be expected for some of the high critical energy wigglers. Front end components which intercept the photon beam produced by IDs must be able to absorb and safety dissipate the heat loads associated with their power distributions. In addition, detection of the position of the photon beam in some cases requires a precision in the range of a few microns. The information from such photon beam monitors is used primarily in the particle beam control loop in order to maintain the position and take-off angle of the particle beam within some fraction of the beam size and angular divergence dictated by the emittance of the lattice. In most cases, these photon beam detectors must function in the high flux environment of the x-ray beam.
Date: April 1, 1988
Creator: Viccaro, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fission product plateout/liftoff/washoff test plan. Revision 1

Description: A test program is planned in the COMEDIE loop of the Commissariat a l`Energy Atomique (CEA), Grenoble, France, to generate integral test data for the validation of computer codes used to predict fission product transport and core corrosion in the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The inpile testing will be performed by the CEA under contract from the US Department of Energy (DOE); the contract will be administered by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary purpose of this test plan is to provide an overview of the proposed program in terms of the overall scope and schedule. 8 refs, 3 figs.
Date: May 1, 1988
Creator: Acharya, R. & Hanson, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Losses of vacuum-chamber full-penetration weldments

Description: In the storage ring of the 7 GeV Advanced Photon Source, there are 480 vacuum-chamber end flanges and 80 tube welded joints, accounting for a total of 560 full-penetration weldments. This note is to give an estimation of the longitudinal and transverse losses contributed by these weldments. For this purpose, the elliptical cross-section of the structure is approximated by a circular one. The 2D code TBCI is then employed to calculate the losses for three different beam bunch lengths, which are, respectively, 0.58, 1.16 and 1.76 cm. As a comparison, the losses of the RF cavities and of the transitions between beam chamber and insertion device (ID) sections are also listed. It is seen that the losses contributed by the weldments are very small. They should not have any significant effects on beam dynamics.
Date: August 1, 1988
Creator: Sherman, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

Description: Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.
Date: Spring 1988
Creator: Rivera, S.; Lugo, T. & Hazen, T. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance criteria testing

Description: Savannah River Plant (SRP) has initiated an aggressive program aimed at improving their shipper/receiver (S/R) posture. The site is routinely involved in 800 nuclear material transfers/year. This many transactions between facilities provides many opportunities for resolving S/R differences. Resolution of S/R differences requires considerable effort from both DOE offices and contractors, presents legitimate safeguards concerns if the receiving quantity is less than the quantity shipped, and must be resolved for shipments to continue. This paper will discuss the programs in place at SRP to improve their position versus shipments and receipts of nuclear materials including: S/R agreements, which provide a method of communicating between the shipping and receiving facility and protects both facilities by eliminating misunderstandings; nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation, which allows the facility to obtain an accountability quality value for receipt before the material is processed; more accurate and precise analytical techniques in use wherever SRP does not have the capability to measure a shipment or receipt by NDA; S/R values are graphed to identify trends and/or biases that may not have exceeded any error limits; and the central Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) division has become more involved in analyzing the data from shipments and receipts including the calculation of limits of error (LOE`s), instrument biases, and analyzing trends.
Date: 1988-06~
Creator: Davis, F. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predicted discharge plutonium isotopics for LEU [low-enriched uranium] test pebble irradiated in the AVR [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor]

Description: A Subprogram Plan related to the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) Test Program is in place and describes cooperative work being carried out under the United States/Federal Republic of Germany (US/FRG) Implementing Agreement for Cooperation in Gas-Cooled Reactor Development. The AVR information to be provided as described in the plan will provide a basis for examining the accuracy of computational methods used for performance and safety analysis. The purpose of the cooperation is to obtain experimental information from the AVR relevant to the performance and safety of modular gas-cooled reactors, and to compare measured results with predictions of analytical tools. This report provides a progress report on the prediction of plutonium buildup in LEU fuel in a high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and also describes the method for calculating the U-238 resonance integral (cross section). 4 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: June 1, 1988
Creator: Lane, R.K. & Lefler, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department