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User's Manual for the FEHM Application-A Finite-Element Heat- and Mass-Transfer Code

Description: This document is a manual for the use of the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. The code is also capable of incorporating the various adsorption mechanisms, ranging from simple linear relations to nonlinear isotherms, needed to describe the very complex transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data, ...
Date: July 7, 1997
Creator: Zyvoloski, George A.; Robinson, Bruce A.; Dash, Zora V. & Trease, Lynn L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of the Models and Methods for the FEHM Application-A Finite-Element Heat- and Mass-Transfer Code

Description: The mathematical models and numerical methods employed by the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multi-component flow in porous media, are described. The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The component models of FEHM are discussed. The first major component, Flow- and Energy-Transport Equations, deals with heat conduction; heat and mass transfer with pressure- and temperature-dependent properties, relative permeabilities and capillary pressures; isothermal air-water transport; and heat and mass transfer with noncondensible gas. The second component, Dual-Porosity and Double-Porosity/Double-Permeability Formulation, is designed for problems dominated by fracture flow. Another component, The Solute-Transport Models, includes both a reactive-transport model that simulates transport of multiple solutes with chemical reaction and a particle-tracking model. Finally, the component, Constitutive Relationships, deals with pressure- and temperature-dependent fluid/air/gas properties, relative permeabilities and capillary pressures, stress dependencies, and reactive and sorbing solutes. Each of these components is discussed in detail, including purpose, assumptions and limitations, derivation, applications, numerical method type, derivation of numerical model, location in the FEHM code flow, numerical stability and accuracy, and alternative approaches to modeling the component.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Zyvoloski, George A.; Robinson, Bruce A.; Dash, Zora V. & Trease, Lynn L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Ghost-Node Method for Linking Different Models with Varied Grid Refinement

Description: A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined models constructed with different numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method for a refined ''child'' model that is contained within a larger and coarser ''parent'' model that is based on the iterative method of Mehl and Hill (2002, 2004). The method is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that has either matching grids (parent cells border an integer number of child cells; Figure 2a) or non-matching grids (parent cells border a non-integer number of child cells; Figure 2b). The coupled grids are simulated using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM, respectively. The simulations require no alteration of the MODFLOW or FEHM models and are executed using a batch file on Windows operating systems. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and child cell boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has error nearly equal to that when coupling two MODFLOW models (Mehl and Hill, 2002). When the grids are non-matching, model accuracy is slightly increased over matching-grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to accurately couple distinct models because the overall error is less than if only the regional model was used to simulate flow in the child model's domain.
Date: February 15, 2006
Creator: James, Scott C.; Dickinson, Jesse E.; Mehl, Steffen W.; Hill, Mary C.; Leake, Stanley A.; Zyvoloski, George A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department