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The Role of Collection-Level Subject Metadata in Subject Access to Digital Collections in Aggregations

Description: This paper presents a new area of research in library and information sciences - investigation into collection-level subject metadata that describes entire digital collections as integral wholes - and reports results of the multi-method exploratory study combining comparative content analysis of collection-level subject metadata in three large-scale aggregations of digital collections in the USA and Europe, transaction log analysis of user interactions with one of these portals, as well as interviews and observations of aggregation users.
Date: 2011
Creator: Zavalina, Oksana
Partner: UNT College of Information

Contextual Metadata in Digital Aggregations: Application of Collection-Level Subject Metadata and its Role in User Interactions and Information Retrieval

Description: Article discussing a study of contextual metadata in digital aggregations. Results of this study prove importance of provision of collection-level metadata in general and subject metadata in particular to enhance user experiences and information retrieval in digital libraries.
Date: 2011
Creator: Zavalina, Oksana
Partner: UNT College of Information

Integrated Learning of Metadata Quality Evaluation and Metadata Application Profile Development in a Graduate Metadata Course

Description: Presented at the 2017 International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications. This poster presents the graduate metadata courses offered by the University of North Texas and reports a case study of an experiment in the design of an advanced graduate metadata course.
Date: October 26, 2017
Creator: Zavalina, Oksana
Partner: UNT College of Information

Free-Text Collection-Level Metadata in Large-Scale Digital Libraries: A Comparative Content Analysis [Presentation]

Description: This presentation includes audio/video media and discusses metadata. This presentation reports results of the study that used an in-depth comparative content analysis to assess free-text collection-level subject metadata in three large-scale digital cultural heritage aggregations in the United States and Europe.
Date: September 23, 2011
Creator: Zavalina, Oksana
Partner: UNT College of Information

A Case Study of Metadata Creation in the University of North Texas Libraries' Digital Collections

Description: This paper presents a case study of the work carried out by the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries and the intersection of metadata modeling, metadata input rules and documentation, metadata quality assessments, and technology to empower metadata editors to create high-quality metadata.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Tarver, Hannah; Zavalina, Oksana & Phillips, Mark Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Role of Collection-Level Subject Metadata in Subject Access to Digital Collections in Aggregations

Description: This presentation discusses collection-level subject metadata in subject access to digital collections in aggregations. This was presented at the 18th International Conference "Libraries and Information Resources in the Modern World of Science, Culture, Education, and Business" in Sudak, Ukraine.
Date: June 2011
Creator: Zavalina, Oksana
Partner: UNT College of Information

Developing an Empirically-based Framework of Metadata Change and Exploring Relation between Metadata Change and Metadata Quality in MARC Library Metadata

Description: This paper from International Conference on Knowledge Management, ICKM 2016 conference proceedings seeks to test and refine the metadata change framework initially developed for characterizing the change in digital library metadata, in the study of traditional library metadata.
Date: September 27, 2016
Creator: Zavalina, Oksana; Zavalin, Vyacheslav; Shakeri, Shadi & Kizhakkethil, Priya
Partner: UNT College of Information

An Exploratory Analysis of Subject Metadata in the Digital Public Library of America

Description: Paper describing an analysis of subject representation in the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), an aggregate digital library containing more than 8 million item-level metadata records at the time of the study. The findings provide information about the minimum, maximum, and average number of subjects in records from different hubs and hub types, as well as the distribution of unique subject terms across the entire collection.
Date: 2015
Creator: Tarver, Hannah; Phillips, Mark Edward; Zavalina, Oksana & Kizhakkethil, Priya
Partner: UNT Libraries

Identifying Key Success Factors for the Implementation of Enterprise Content Management Systems

Description: Enterprise content management (ECM) is an emerging research area that is beginning to find attention in academia. While the private sector has a growing industry and community for ECM, academia is starting to address this with direct links to the better-established areas of information systems and enterprise resource planning systems. ECM has been viewed as a higher-level concept of methods and strategies pertaining to content management in the context of the enterprise. Like many other organizational wide systems, ECM systems are complex, difficult to implement and risk failing to meet expected success measures. Definitions for what exactly constitutes an ECM system are still evolving. The major issues with ECM systems are that they are increasingly being implemented by organizations in an attempt to address the unmanageable amount of unstructured content over its lifecycle, compliance pressures, collaboration needs, content integrity and continuity, and controlling costs. However, the implementation problems are many and diverse, such as determining content and business processes to be included, determining technologies to fit the organizational needs, how to integrate with existing systems, and managing organizational culture and change for acceptance. There is currently little academic research in the area of ECM, and research determining the key factors that contribute to successful implementations of these systems is absent. This research addressed the existing gap in ECM research and investigated the key success factors for the implementations of ECM systems with the objectives of identifying a set of success factors. Guided by research in related areas and through developing a theoretical framework and the resulting research model, the study used a qualitative case study method to identify ECM implementation factors and their relationship to organizational culture and people, business processes, technology and organizational content. The results of this research were twofold, first by contributing needed research in the ECM ...
Date: August 2014
Creator: Horne, Stephanie Burnett
Partner: UNT Libraries

Convenience to the Cataloger or Convenience to the User?: An Exploratory Study of Catalogers’ Judgment

Description: This mixed-method study explored cataloger’s judgment through the presence of text as entered by catalogers for the 11 electronic resource items during the National Libraries test for Resource Description and Access (RDA). Although the literature discusses cataloger’s judgment and suggests that cataloging practice based on new cataloging code RDA will more heavily rely on cataloger’s judgment, the topic of cataloger’s judgment in RDA cataloging was not formally studied. The purpose of this study was to study the differences and similarities in the MARC records created as a part of the RDA National Test and to determine if the theory of bounded rationality could explain cataloger’s judgment based on the constructs of cognitive and temporal limits. This goal was addressed through a content analysis of the MARC records and various statistical tests (Pearson’s Chi-square, Fisher’s Exact, and Cramer’s V). Analysis of 217 MARC records was performed on seven elements of the bibliographic record. This study found that there were both similarities and differences among the various groups of participants, and there are indications that both support and refute the assertion that catalogers make decisions based on the constructs of time and cognitive ability. Future research is needed to be able to determine if bounded rationality is able to explain cataloger’s judgment; however, there are indicators that both support and refute this assertion. The findings from this research have implications for the cataloging community through the provision of training opportunities for catalogers, evaluating workflows, ensuring the proper indexing of bibliographic records for discovery, and recommended edits to RDA.
Date: May 2015
Creator: Hasenyager, Richard Lee, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries

User-Centered Evaluation of the Quality of Blogs

Description: Blogs serve multiple purposes, resulting in several types of blogs that vary greatly in terms of quality and content. It is important to evaluate the quality of blogs, which requires appropriate evaluation criteria. Unfortunately, there are minimal studies on framework and the specific criteria and indicators for evaluating the quality of blogs. Moreover, quality is related to user perception, and should therefore be evaluated by the receivers. This dissertation examines the criteria and indicators that blog users consider important for evaluating the quality of blogs, and develops a user-centered framework for evaluating quality by conducting user surveys and post-survey email interviews. The personal characteristics that affect the users’ choices of criteria to evaluate the quality of blogs are examined as well. The study’s findings include 1) the criteria that users consider important when evaluating the quality of blogs are content quality, usability, authority, and blog credibility; 2) the indicators that blog users consider most important for evaluating the quality of blogs are understandability, accuracy, believability, currency, ease of use, and navigation; and 3) gender, education level, age, profession, purpose of use, and specific interests affect the user’s choices of criteria for evaluating the quality of blogs. Future research may involve exploring and applying the framework developed in this study to build automatic quality blog identification system for the purpose of assisting web users and information specialists to identify quality blogs.
Date: August 2011
Creator: Chuenchom, Sutthinan
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Grounded Theory of Information Quality in Web Archives

Description: Web archiving is the practice of preserving websites as a historical record. It is a technologically-challenging endeavor that has as its goal the creation of a high-quality archived website that looks and behaves exactly like the original website. Despite the importance of the notion of quality, comprehensive definitions of Information Quality (IQ) in a web archive have yet to be developed. Currently, the field has no single, comprehensive theory that describes what is a high-quality or low-quality archived website. Furthermore, most of the research that has been conducted on web archives has been system-centered and not user-centered, leading to a dearth of information on how humans perceive web archives. This dissertation seeks to remedy this problem by presenting a user-centered grounded theory of IQ for web archives. It answers two research questions: 1) What is the definition of information quality (IQ) for web archives? and 2) How can IQ in a web archive be measured? The theory presented is grounded on data obtained from users of the Internet Archive's Archive-It system, the largest web-archiving subscription service in the United States. Also presented are mathematical definitions for each dimension of IQ, which can then be applied to measure the quality of a web archive.
Date: August 2018
Creator: Reyes, Brenda
Partner: UNT Libraries