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Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3

Description: A major part of the work in this quarter was on the combustor tests in task 2. Three of the six planned tests in this task were completed. The first two were parametric tests of nominal one shift, (8 hour) duration on coal. Due to failure of the UV detector in the first test only several hours of coal fired operation were completed. In the second test, coal fired operation continued for the planned one shift until the 4 ton coal bin was empty. After reviewing this work with DOE, it was decided to focus the remaining test on longer duration operation with each test at one optimum condition. The third test was planned for two shift coal fired operation. Due to a problem with the pilot gas ignitor, combustion was delayed by 5 hours from 7 AM to Noon. As a result coal fired operation was limited to one shift between 3 PM and 11 PM. Throughout this period the combustor remained at one fixed condition with the use of computer control. Results for these three tests are presented in this report. Most of the work on the task 4 design and cost of a 20 MW combined gas-steam turbine power plant using the air cooled combustor was completed in the previous quarter. The results obtained by the A/E subcontractor on the installation desip and cost were evaluated in the present quarter and they are summarized in this report.
Date: February 15, 1993
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development & testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, phase 3. Fourteenth quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

Description: The effort of the second quarter of calendar year 1995 continued the work on task 5, {open_quotes}Site Demonstration{close_quotes}, with emphasis on installation of the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor and auxiliary equipment at the Philadelphia test site. The task 5 effort involves testing the combustor over extended periods under conditions that fully simulate commercial operation and that meet the combustion and environmental specifications for this project. To meet this project objective within the current work scope requires 500 hours of testing. Operation beyond this period is dependent on recovering the added costs by placing the steam production from the boiler to beneficial use. During the present quarterly reporting period, most of the major components needed to implement the initial 100 hours of testing under task 5 were installed at the test site. The only major remaining work at the end of this reporting period was the installation of power to the components and the installation of the controls and diagnostics. This work will be performed in the next quarter.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

Description: In the fourth quarter of calendar year 1995 the installation and checkout of the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor and auxiliary equipment in Philadelphia was completed. The task 5, Site Demonstration Testing, combustor-boiler tests on gas, oil, and coal were initiated. The task 5 effort involves testing the combustor over extended periods under conditions that fully simulate commercial operation and that meet the combustion and environmental specifications for this project. To meet this project objective within the current work scope requires up to 500 hours of testing. The focus of this testing will be on the component and environmental performance of combustor, boiler, coal preparation and feeding, and the stack gas equipment. The facility can be converted to a 500 kW power plant by the addition of a steam turbine, condenser, and cooling tower. However, this added effort is beyond the current work scope and its implementation will depend on recovering the added costs by placing the steam production from the boiler to beneficial use. During the present quarterly reporting period, all the components needed to implement the initial 100 hours of testing under task 5 were installed at the test site, and checkout of this equipment was performed. Since the present installation contained substantial improvements and simplifications to all sub-systems that had been used in the Williamsport facility, each component and sub-system had to be tested individually.
Date: January 3, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Seventeenth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

Description: In the first quarter of calendar year 1996, 9 days of combust-boiler tests were performed. Between these tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. In January and early February, the modifications and installations indicated by the 6 days of testing in December 1995 were implemented. This was followed by 6 additional consecutive test days in mid- February. This was in turn followed by additional modifications, followed by a series of 3 one day, coal fired tests at end of March. These latter tests were the first ones in which slagging conditions were achieved in the combustor. The maximum thermal input was 13 MMBtu/hr, which equals two-thirds of the rated boiler heat input. The measured thermal, combustion, and slagging performance achieved in the combustor was superior to that achieved in the final series of tests conducted in Williamsport in 1993. The combustor-boiler facility is now ready for implementation of the task 5 site demonstration.
Date: April 7, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system: Phase 3, Progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

Description: The primary objective of the present Phase 3 effort is to perform the final testing, at a 20 MMBtu/hr commercial scale, of an air cooled, slagging coal combustor for application to industrial steam boilers and power plants. The focus of the test effort is on combustor durability, automatic control of the combustor`s operation, and optimum environmental control of emissions inside the combustor. In connection with the latter, the goal is to achieve 0.4lb/MMBtu of SO{sub 2} emissions, 0.2 lb./MMBtu of NO{sub x}, emissions, and 0.02 lb. particulates/MMBtu. To meet the particulate goal a baghouse will be used to augment the slag retention in the combustor. The NO{sub x} emission goal will require a modest improvement over maximum reduction achieved to date in the combustor to a level of 0.26 lb. /MMBtu. To reach the SO{sub 2} emissions goal may require a combination of sorbent injection inside the combustor and sorbent injection inside the boiler, or stack. In the third quarter of calendar year 1995 work continued on task 5, ``Site Demonstration``, with emphasis on installation of the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor and auxiliary equipment at the Philadelphia test site. The task 5 effort involve testing the combustor over extended periods under conditions that fully simulate commercial operation and that meet the combustion and environmental specifications for this project. During the present quarterly reporting period, over 90% of the components needed to implement the initial 100 hours of testing were installed at the test site.
Date: October 12, 1995
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Thirteenth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

Description: The present report is a summary of the activities in February and March 1995. The primary activities during these two months was to monitor the fabricator of the combustor extension in order to assure completion of the work according to the design, to procure the additional components needed to install the combustor-boiler system at the Arsenal test site, and on initial installation of auxiliary components at the site. Welding of the combustor extension major sections began in mid-January. However, the quality of the welds was poor and a number of non-critical flanges were warped during welding. As a result the fabricator replaced the welders and the quality assurance personnel in early February. To assure that the welded sections would properly mate with the existing combustor, Coal Tech personnel regularly visited the fabricator until the end of March. The combustor extension section was completed and delivered to the Arsenal at the end of March. To meet the Philadelphia particulate emission standard of 0.06 lb/MMBtu a baghouse was procured in February. Competitive procurement of the stack ducting from the boiler to the baghouse and to the atmosphere was initiated. Pneumatically controlled valves for the combustor extension section`s air cooling sub-system were ordered and delivered.
Date: April 18, 1995
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development & testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Eleventh quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

Description: The primary objective of the present effort is to perform the final testing, at a 20Mmbtu/hr commercial scale, of an air cooled, slagging coal combustor for application to industrial steam boilers and power plants. The focus of the test effort is on combustor durability, automatic control of the combustor`s operation, and optimal environmental control of emissions inside the combustor.
Date: November 15, 1994
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. First quarterly technical progress report, September 14--December 31, 1995

Description: The objective of this 24 month project is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor. This effort will consist of a series of up to 20 parametric tests in a 20 MMBtu/hr slagging, air cooled, cyclone combustor. During the present reporting period, this combustor was in the final stages of re-installation in a new facility in Philadelphia, PA following its relocation from a test facility in Williamsport, PA. Initial shakedown test on this new combustor facility began in December 1995, at the end of the present quarterly reporting period. The shakedown tests will continue through the next quarterly reporting period in the first three months of calendar year 1996. SO{sub 2} is controlled by injecting calcium oxide based sorbents into the combustor to react with sulfur emitted during combustion. The spent sorbent is dissolved in the slag and removed with it, thereby encapsulating the sulfur in slag. Part of the sorbent exits the combustor with the combustion products into the boiler where it can react with the sulfur. The primary objective of the present tests is to maximize the degree of sulfur retention in the slag. All spent sorbent not reporting to the slag is either deposited in the boiler or it is removed in the stack particle scrubber.
Date: February 10, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Second quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

Description: The objective of this 24 month project is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor. This effort will consist of a series of up to 20 parametric tests in a 20 MMBtu/hr slagging, air cooled, cyclone combustor. During the present reporting period, this combustor was tested for a total of 9 days in February and at the end of March. The tests at the end of March were the first ones in which excellent slagging combustor operation was achieved. This is the key requirement for implementing the test effort in the present project. Therefore, the combustor is now ready for testing under the current project, and initial tests are planned during the next quarterly reporting period, as per the project schedule.
Date: April 8, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor, with internal sulfur, nitrogen, and ash control for the conversion of a 23 MMBtu/hour oil fired boiler to pulverized coal

Description: The project objective was to demonstrate a technology which can be used to retrofit oil/gas designed boilers, and conventional pulverized coal fired boilers to direct coal firing, by using a patented sir cooled coal combustor that is attached in place of oil/gas/coal burners. A significant part of the test effort was devoted to resolving operational issues related to uniform coal feeding, efficient combustion under very fuel rich conditions, maintenance of continuous slag flow and removal from the combustor, development of proper air cooling operating procedures, and determining component materials durability. The second major focus of the test effort was on environmental control, especially control of SO{sub 2} emissions. By using staged combustion, the NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by around 3/4 to 184 ppmv, with further reductions to 160 ppmv in the stack particulate scrubber. By injection of calcium based sorbents into the combustor, stack SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by a maximum of of 58%. (VC)
Date: August 30, 1991
Creator: Zauderer, B. & Fleming, E.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor, with internal sulfur, nitrogen, and ash control for the conversion of a 23 MMBTU/hour oil fired boiler to pulverized coal

Description: This work contains to the final report of the demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor. Titles include: Chronological Description of the Clean Coal Project Tests,'' Statistical Analysis of Operating Data for the Coal Tech Combustor,'' Photographic History of the Project,'' Results of Slag Analysis by PA DER Module 1 Procedure,'' Properties of the Coals Limestone Used in the Test Effort,'' Results of the Solid Waste Sampling Performed on the Coal Tech Combustor by an Independent Contractor During the February 1990 Tests.'' (VC)
Date: August 30, 1991
Creator: Zauderer, B. & Fleming, E.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Nineteenth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

Description: In the third quarter of calendar year 1996, 13 days of combust-boiler tests were performed, including 3 days of tests on a parallel DOE sponsored project on sulfur retention in a stagging combustor. Between tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. This brings the total number of test days to the end of September in the task 5 effort to 41, increased to 46 as of the date of this Report, 10/27/96. This compares with a total of 63 test days needed to complete the task 5 test effort. As reported previously, the only major modification to the Williamsport combustor has been the addition of a new downstream section, which lengthens the combustor and improves the combustor-boiler interface. The original combustor section, which includes the fuel, air, and cooling water delivery systems remained basically unchanged. Only the refractory liner was completely replaced, a task which occurs on an annual basis in all commercial stagging utility combustors. Therefore, this combustor has been operated since 1988 without replacement.
Date: October 27, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

Description: The primary project objective is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor. This non-equilibrium process is a key step in the capture and retention of sulfur released during coal combustion by the interaction with calcium based sorbent particles. By encapsulating the sulfur bearing calcium particles in slag, the need for landfilling of this waste is eliminated. This objective will be implemented through a series of up to 20 one day tests carried out in a 20 MMBtu/hr air cooled, slagging combustor-boiler installation located in Philadelphia, PA. The project will consist of two tasks. Task 1 consists of the experiments conducted in the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor, and task 2 will consist of analysis of this data. All the operating procedures for this effort have been developed in the 7 years of operation of this combustor.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

Description: Calcium oxide sorbents injected in a stagging combustor react with the sulfur released during coal combustion to form sulfur bearing particles, some of which are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Since the solubility of sulfur in liquid slag is low, the slag must be drained from the combustor to limit sulfur re-evolution into the gas phase. The objective of this 24 month project is to perform a series of 16 one day tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag that is drained from the combustor. In the present quarterly reporting period, 10 days of combustor tests were performed, bringing the total number of tests performed to 15. A wide range of operating conditions were tested including injection of metal oxide powders to achieve total mineral injection rates in excess of 400 lb/hr at coal mass flow rates of around 1000 lb/hr. It was determined that efficient sulfur capture requires calcium oxide particle sizes that are too small to be effectively retained in the combustor. On the other hand, injection of coarse calcium sulfate particles into the combustor sharply increased the slag viscosity, thereby reducing the slag flow rate and causing substantial revolution of the sulfur in the slag. It is tentatively concluded that conditions necessary for sulfur capture with sorbents and its retention in the slag cannot be efficiently achieved in one step in a cyclone combustor. It is further concluded that due to the increases in slag viscosity by calcium sulfate extremely high slag mass flow rates are required for sulfur retention in slag. Further tests in that direction are planned for the next quarterly reporting period.
Date: February 4, 1997
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

Description: The objective of this 24 month project is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor with sulfur capture by calcium oxide sorbent injection into the combustor. This sulfur capture process consists of two steps: Capture of sulfur with calcined calcium oxide followed by impact of the reacted sulfur-calcium particles on the liquid slag lining the combustor. The sulfur bearing slag must be removed within several minutes from the combustor to prevent re-evolution of the sulfur from the slag. To accomplish this requires slag mass flow rates in the range of several 100 lb/hr. To study this two step process in the combustor, two groups of tests are being implemented. In the first group, calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum, or plaster of Paris, was injected in the combustor to determine sulfur evolution from slag. In the second group, the entire process is tested with limestone and/or calcium hydrate injected into the combustor. This entire effort consists of a series of up to 16 parametric tests in a 20 MMtu/hr slagging, air cooled, cyclone combustor. During the present quarterly reporting period ending September 30,1996, three tests in this project were implemented, bringing the total tests to 5. In addition, a total of 10 test days were completed during this quarter on the parallel project that utilizes the same 20 MMtu/hr combustor. The results of that project, especially those related to improved slagging performance, have a direct bearing on this project in assuring proper operation at the high slag flow rates that may be necessary to achieve high sulfur retention in slag.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Eighteenth quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

Description: In the second quarter of calendar year 1996, 16 days of combust- boiler tests were performed, including 2 days of tests on a parallel DOE sponsored project on sulfur retention in a slagging combustor. Between tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. This brings the total number of test days to the end of June in the task 5 effort to 28, increased to 36 as of the date of this Report, 8/18/96. This compares with a total of 63 test days needed to complete the task 5 test effort. It is important to note that the only major modification to the Williamsport combustor has been the addition of a new downstream section, which lengthens the combustor and improves the combustor-boiler interface. The original combustor section, which includes the fuel, air, and cooling water delivery systems remained basically unchanged. Only the refractory liner was completely replaced, a task which occurs on an annual basis in all commercial slagging utility combustors. Therefore, this combustor has been operated since 1988 without replacement. The tests in the present reporting period are of major significance in that beginning with the first test on March 31st, for the first time slagging opening conditions were achieved in the upgraded combustor. The first results showed that the present 20 MMBtu/hr combustor design is far superior to the previous one tested since 1988 in Williamsport, PA. The most important change is that over 95% of the slag was drained from the slag tap in the combustor. This compares with an range of one-third to one-half in Williamsport. In the latter, the balance of the slag flowed out of the exit nozzle into the boiler floor. In addition, the overall system performance, including the combustor, boiler, and stack equipment, ranged from good to excellent. ...
Date: August 18, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium Sulfur Capture and Retention in an Air Cooled Slagging Coal Combustor.

Description: Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor react with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur bearing particles, which are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Analysis indicated that slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 36 month project was to perform a series of 16 one day tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag. In the present quarterly reporting period, 3 days of combustor tests were performed, bringing the total number of tests performed to 19. Two of the test were a repeat of two tests performed in the previous quarter with a high, 37% ash, Indian coal. The high slag flow rate with that coal resulted in the highest observed sulfur retention to-date, namely 20% of the injected sulfur. In the present quarter, this test was repeated with the same coal feed rate but with 75% longer period of 2.4 hours. The total mineral matter injected was 635 lb/hr, compared to only 19.7 lb/hr of sulfur, of which 75% was from injected gypsum. However, despite excellent slag flow from the previous Indian coal tests, only 5.8% of the sulfur from the gypsum reported to the slag. Since substantial amounts slag remained on the combustor walls, it is concluded that still longer duration tests are required to establish equilibrium conditions. Current efforts are focused on finding a U.S. source of high ash coal to implement additional tests.
Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Testing of Industrial Scale, Coal-Fired Combustion System: Phase 3.

Description: In the first quarter of calendar year 1997, 17 days of combustor- boiler tests were performed, including one day of tests on a parallel DOE sponsored project on sulfur retention in a slagging combustor. Between tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. This brings the total number of test days required to meet the task 5 project plan. The key project objectives in the areas of combustor performance and environmental performance have been exceeded. With sorbent injection in the combustion gas train, NO{sub x} emissions as low as 0.07 lb/MMBtu and SO{sub 2} emissions as low as 0.2 lb/MMBtu have been measured in tests in this quarter. Tests in the present quarter have resulted in further optimizing the sorbent injection and NO{sub x} control processes. A very important milestone in this quarter was two successful combustor tests on a very high ash (37%) Indian coal. Work in the next quarter will focus on commercialization of the combustor- boiler system. In addition, further tests of the NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} control process and on the Indian coal will be performed.
Date: April 21, 1997
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor

Description: Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor react with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur bearing particles, which are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Analysis indicated that slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re- evolution. The objective of this 36 month project was to perform a series of 16 one day tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag. In the present quarterly reporting period, 3 days of combustor tests were performed, bringing the total number of tests performed to 19. Two of the test were a repeat of two tests performed in the previous quarter with a high, 37% ash, Indian coal. The high slag flow rate with that coal resulted in the highest observed sulfur retention to-date, namely 20% of the injected sulfur. In the present quarter, this test was repeated with the same coal feed rate but with 75% longer period of 2.4 hours. The total mineral matter injected was 635 lb/hr, compared to only 19.7 lb/hr of sulfur, of which 75% was from injected gypsum. However, despite excellent slag flow from the previous Indian coal tests, only 5.8% of the sulfur from the gypsum reported to the slag. Since substantial amounts slag remained on the combustor walls, it is concluded that still longer duration tests are required to establish equilibrium conditions. Current efforts are focused on finding a U.S. source of high ash coal to implement additional tests.
Date: August 13, 1997
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonequilibrium Sulfur Capture and Retention in an Air cooled Slagging Coal Combustion.

Description: Calcium oxide sorbents injected in a slagging combustor react with the sulfur released during coal combustion to form sulfur bearing particles, some of which are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Since the solubility of sulfur in liquid slag is low, the slag must be drained from the combustor to limit sulfur re-evolution into the gas phase. The objective of this 24 month project is to perform a series of 16 one day tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag that is drained from the combustor. The last of the 16 tests planned for this project was completed in the present reporting period. This was the first test in this project that validated one of the primary hypothesis of this project, namely to retain substantial quantities of sulfur in slag requires high slag mass flow rate. Previous attempts to achieve high sulfur retention with artificial slag met limited success. In this, the 16th test, a high, 37%, ash Indian coal was injected into Coal Tech`s 20 MMBtu/hr air cooled, slagging combustor with gypsum, CaSO{sub 4} (2H{sub 2}O). The slag analysis showed that 20% of the sulfur in the gypsum remained in the slag. This is double the highest sulfur concentration in slag measured in numerous test operations with this combustor. While the test results to date have met the objectives of this project, further high slag mass flow rate tests are planned with the Indian coal to optimize sulfur retention in slag.
Date: April 14, 1997
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Testing of Industrial Scale, Coal-Fired Combustin System, Phase 3. Twenty second technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1997

Description: In the second quarter of calendar year 1997, 9 days of combustor- boiler tests were performed, including 3 days of tests on a parallel DOE sponsored project on sulfur retention in a slagging combustor. Between tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. This brings the total number of test days to the end of June 1997 in the task 5 effort to 83 days. This compares with a total of 63 test days needed to complete the task 5 test effort, and the number of tests days required to meet the task 5 project plan have been completed. The key project objectives in the areas of combustor performance and environmental performance have been exceeded. With sorbent injection in the combustion gas train, NO{sub x} emissions as low as 0.07 lb/MMBtu and S0{sub 2} emissions as low as 0.lb/MBtu have been measured in tests in the previous quarter. The emphasis of tests in the present quarter have been on further optimizing post-combustion sorbent injection for S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control processes, with most of the test effort focused on the NO{sub x} control process. Many factors which control the NO{sub x} reduction were identified in tests on the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler. Another very important milestone in this quarter was the successful test of this Coal Tech post combustion NO{sub x} control process on a 100 MAR utility boiler, where in a preliminary test 25% NO{sub x} reduction was measured.
Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Zauderer, B., Dr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department