11 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

LESSONS LEARNED FROM A RECENT LASER ACCIDENT

Description: A graduate student received a laser eye injury from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser beam while adjusting a polarizing beam splitter optic. The direct causes for the accident included failure to follow safe alignment practices and failure to wear the required laser eyewear protection. Underlying root causes included inadequate on-the-job training and supervision, inadequate adherence to requirements, and inadequate appreciation for dimly visible beams outside the range of 400-700nm. This paper describes how the accident occurred, discusses causes and lessons learned, and describes corrective actions being taken.
Date: January 26, 2011
Creator: Woods, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Compliance of SLAC_s Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy

Description: SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance.
Date: January 15, 2009
Creator: Woods, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Addressing Control of Hazardous Energy (COHE) Requirements in a Laser Safety Program

Description: OSHA regulation 29CFR1910.147 specifies control of hazardous energy requirements for 'the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees.' Class 3B and Class 4 laser beams must be considered hazardous energy sources because of the potential for serious eye injury; careful consideration is therefore needed to safely de-energize these lasers. This paper discusses and evaluates control of hazardous energy principles in this OSHA regulation, in ANSI Z136.1 ''Safe Use of Lasers,'' and in ANSI Z244.1 ''Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods.'' Recommendations are made for updating and improving CoHE (control of hazardous energy) requirements in these standards for their applicability to safe laser operations.
Date: February 15, 2012
Creator: Woods, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Safety: A Laser Alignment Practical Training Course

Description: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has developed a Laser Alignment Practical Training Course as one of its core laser safety classes. The course is taught to small groups of up to three students and takes 1-3 hours to complete. This practical course is not a substitute for site-specific On-the-Job Training; it does, however, provide a good introduction in core laser safety practices that can be broadly applied. Alignment and diagnostic tasks are performed with low power lasers. Students learn safe alignment and diagnostic techniques and how to avoid common mistakes that might lead to an accident. The class is taught by laser supervisors, enabling them to assess the skill level of new laser personnel and determine the subsequent level of supervision needed. The course has six alignment tasks. For each task, discussion points are given for the instructor to review with the students. The optics setup includes different wavelength lasers, a beam expander, mirrors, irises, a periscope, a beam-splitting polarizer and a diffraction grating. Diagnostic tools include viewing cards, an IR viewer and a ccd camera. Laser eyewear is available to block some laser wavelengths in the setup.
Date: January 26, 2011
Creator: Woods, Michael & Edstrom, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electroweak Results from the SLD Experiment

Description: We present an overview of the electroweak physics program of the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). A data sample of 550K Z{sup 0} decays has been collected. This experiment utilizes a highly polarized electron beam, a small interaction volume, and a very precise pixel vertex detector. It is the first experiment at a linear electron collider. We present a preliminary result for the weak mixing angle, sin{sup 2}({theta}{sub W}{sup eff}) = 0.23110 {+-} 0.00029. We also present a preliminary result for the parity violating parameter, A{sub b} = 0.898 {+-} 0.029. These measurements are used to test for physics beyond the Standard Model.
Date: May 7, 1999
Creator: Woods, Michael B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

Description: This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water emulsions stabilized by fine particles of limestone (CaCO{sub 3}). Specifically, here we report on the tests performed in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF) using a Kenics-type static mixer for the formation of a CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by fine particles of CaCO{sub 3}. The tested static mixer has an ID of 0.5 cm, length 23.5 cm, number of baffles 27. Under pressure, a slurry of CaCO{sub 3} particles (mean particle size 6 {micro}m) in reverse osmosis (RO) water and liquid CO{sub 2} were co-injected into the mixer. From the mixer, the resulting emulsion flowed into the HPWTF, which was filled with RO water kept at 6.8 MPa pressure and 4, 8 or 12 C. The emulsion plume was photographed by three video cameras through spy windows mounted on the wall of the HPWTF. The mixer produced an emulsion consisting of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets sheathed with a layer of CaCO{sub 3} particles dispersed in water. The sheathed droplets are called globules. The globules diameter was measured to be in the 300-500 {micro}m range. The globules were sinking in the HPWTF, indicating that they are heavier than the ambient water. The tests in the HPWTF confirmed that the Kenics-type static mixer is an efficient device for forming a CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by fine particles of CaCO{sub 3}. The static mixer may prove to be a practical device for sequestering large quantities of CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean in the form of a CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CaCO{sub 3} emulsion. The static mixer can be mounted at the end of pipelines feeding the mixer. The static mixer has no moving parts. The pressure drop across the mixer that is necessary to sustain good ...
Date: April 1, 2006
Creator: Golomb, Dan; Barry, Eugene; Ryan, David; Pennell, Stephen; Swett, Peter; Duan, Huishan et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

Description: This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by fine particles. In previous semi-annual reports we described the formation of stable C/W emulsions using pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), flyash, beach sand, shale and lizardite, a rock rich in magnesium silicate. For the creation of these emulsions we used a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) equipped with view windows for illumination and video camera recording. For deep ocean sequestration, a C/W emulsion using pulverized limestone may be the most suitable. (a) Limestone (mainly CaCO{sub 3}) is cheap and plentiful; (b) limestone is innocuous for marine organisms (in fact, it is the natural ingredient of shells and corals); (c) it buffers the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in water. For large-scale sequestration of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion a device is needed that mixes the ingredients, liquid carbon dioxide, seawater, and a slurry of pulverized limestone in seawater continuously, rather than incrementally as in a batch reactor. A practical mixing device is a Kenics-type static mixer. The static mixer has no moving parts, and the shear force for mixing is provided by the hydrostatic pressure of liquid CO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3} slurry in the delivery pipes from the shore to the disposal depth. This semi-annual progress report is dedicated to the description of the static mixer and the results that have been obtained using a bench-scale static mixer for the continuous formation of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion. The static mixer has an ID of 0.63 cm, length 23.5 cm, number of baffles 27. Under pressure, a slurry of CaCO{sub 3} in artificial seawater (3.5% by weight NaCl) and liquid CO{sub 2} are co-injected into the mixer. From the mixer, the resulting emulsion flows into a Jerguson cell with two oblong windows ...
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Golomb, Dan; Barry, Eugene; Ryan, David; Lawton, Carl; Pennell, Stephen; Swett, Peter et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC_s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

Description: The LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be the world's first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelengths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast x-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, with pulses powerful enough to take diffraction images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. Ultrafast conventional lasers will be used as the pump. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray Hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized Laser Hall, containing up to three Class 4 laser systems, three x-ray Hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the Hutches. The main components of the NEH laser systems are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a regen amplifier, green pump lasers for the oscillator and regen, a pulse compressor and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues are discussed.
Date: January 15, 2009
Creator: Woods, Michael; Anthony, Perry; /SLAC; Barat, Ken; /LBL, Berkeley; Gilevich, Sasha et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

Description: Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating ...
Date: September 30, 2008
Creator: Golomb, Dan; Barry, Eugene; Ryan, David; Pennell, Stephen; Lawton, Carl; Swett, Peter et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department