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Rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) technology for Countermine (Sea) Program -- Phase 1

Description: This Phase 1 report documents the results of one of the subtasks that was initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of a foam that can neutralize mines and barriers and allow the safe passage of amphibious landing craft and vehicles was the objective of this subtask of the Sea Mine Countermeasures Technology program. This phase of the program concentrated on laboratory characterization of foam properties and field experiments with prefabricated foam blocks to determine the capability of RPF to adequately carry military traffic. It also established the flammability characteristics of the material under simulated operational conditions, extended the understanding of explosive cavity formation in RPF to include surface explosions, established the tolerance to typical military fluids, and the response to bullet impact. Many of the basic analyses required to establish the operational concept are reported. The initial field experiments were conducted at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM in November 1995 through February 1996.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Woodfin, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical sensors for classification of mine-like objects by identification of explosives

Description: This paper briefly describes a prototype sensor for detecting land mines placed in shallow water. An automatic system was developed which incorporates chemical concentration technology, an ion mobility spectrometer, and control and fluid movement subsystems. The system design was successfully demonstrated using laboratory instruments and equipment. Components for the portable unit, which will weigh less than 20 pounds, have been fabricated; field demonstrations will be completed by spring 1998. 4 figs.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Woodfin, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structural response to a steam explosion in a PWR

Description: Beginning with the assumption that a hypothetical steam-explosion occurs in the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor, the structural consequences are investigated. A simplified model of an individual installation is used for the investigation. Finite element and finite difference analyses of water-head impact conditions are described. Analysis of the possibility of ejection of a control rod drive assembly as a missile is investigated. Conclusions indicate that the only containment threatening consequence is the possible but unlikely generation and flight of such a missile and that large, i.e., whole head sized missiles, appear precluded.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Woodfin, R.L. & Voelker, L.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of experiments on rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) for protection from mines

Description: Sandia National Labs has been investigating the use of rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) for military use, particularly for mine protection for the past two years. Results of explosive experiments and mine/foam interaction experiments are presented. The RPF has proved to be effective in absorbing direct shock from explosives. Quantitative data are presented. As reported elsewhere, it has proved effective in reducing the signature of vehicles passing over anti-tank (AT) mines to prevent the mine from firing. This paper presents the results of experiments done to understand the interaction of RPF with anti-craft (AC) mines during foam formation in shallow water in a scaled surf environment.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Woodfin, R.L.; Hance, B.G.; Schmidt, C.O. & Banks, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical sensing system for classification of mine-like objects by explosives detection

Description: Sandia National Laboratories has conducted research in chemical sensing and analysis of explosives for many years. Recently, that experience has been directed towards detecting mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) by sensing the low-level explosive signatures associated with these objects. The authors focus has been on the classification of UXO in shallow water and anti-personnel/anti tank mines on land. The objective of this work is to develop a field portable chemical sensing system which can be used to examine mine-like objects (MLO) to determine whether there are explosive molecules associated with the MLO. Two sampling subsystems have been designed, one for water collection and one for soil/vapor sampling. The water sampler utilizes a flow-through chemical adsorbent canister to extract and concentrate the explosive molecules. Explosive molecules are thermally desorbed from the concentrator and trapped in a focusing stage for rapid desorption into an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors describe a prototype system which consists of a sampler, concentrator-focuser, and detector. The soil sampler employs a light-weight probe for extracting and concentrating explosive vapor from the soil in the vicinity of an MLO. The chemical sensing system is capable of sub-part-per-billion detection of TNT and related explosive munition compounds. They present the results of field and laboratory tests on buried landmines which demonstrate their ability to detect the explosive signatures associated with these objects.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Chambers, W.B.; Rodacy, P.J.; Jones, E.E.; Gomez, B.J. & Woodfin, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department