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Undulator Field Integral Measurements

Description: The LCLS undulator field integrals must be very small so that the beam trajectory slope and offset stay within tolerance. In order to make accurate measurements of the small field integrals, a long coil will be used. This note describes the design of the coil measurement system.
Date: December 7, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Vibrating Wire System For Quadrupole Fiducialization

Description: A vibrating wire system is being developed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note provides a detailed analysis of the system. The LCLS will have quadrupoles between the undulator segments to keep the electron beam focused. If the quadrupoles are not centered on the beam axis, the beam will receive transverse kicks, causing it to deviate from the undulator axis. Beam based alignment will be used to move the quadrupoles onto a straight line, but an initial, conventional alignment must place the quadrupole centers on a straight line to 100 {micro}m. In the fiducialization step of the initial alignment, the position of the center of the quadrupole is measured relative to tooling balls on the outside of the quadrupole. The alignment crews then use the tooling balls to place the magnet in the tunnel. The required error on the location of the quadrupole center relative to the tooling balls must be less than 25 {micro}m. In this note, we analyze a system under construction for the quadrupole fiducialization. The system uses the vibrating wire technique to position a wire onto the quadrupole magnetic axis. The wire position is then related to tooling balls using wire position detectors. The tooling balls on the wire position detectors are finally related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to perform the fiducialization. The total 25 {micro}m fiducialization error must be divided between these three steps. The wire must be positioned onto the quadrupole magnetic axis to within 10 {micro}m, the wire position must be measured relative to tooling balls on the wire position detectors to within 15 {micro}m, and tooling balls on the wire position detectors must be related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to within 10 {micro}m. The techniques used in these three steps will be discussed. ...
Date: December 13, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

Description: Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. ...
Date: December 13, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Algorithms to Automate LCLS Undulator Tuning

Description: Automation of the LCLS undulator tuning offers many advantages to the project. Automation can make a substantial reduction in the amount of time the tuning takes. Undulator tuning is fairly complex and automation can make the final tuning less dependent on the skill of the operator. Also, algorithms are fixed and can be scrutinized and reviewed, as opposed to an individual doing the tuning by hand. This note presents algorithms implemented in a computer program written for LCLS undulator tuning. The LCLS undulators must meet the following specifications. The maximum trajectory walkoff must be less than 5 {micro}m over 10 m. The first field integral must be below 40 x 10{sup -6} Tm. The second field integral must be below 50 x 10{sup -6} Tm{sup 2}. The phase error between the electron motion and the radiation field must be less than 10 degrees in an undulator. The K parameter must have the value of 3.5000 {+-} 0.0005. The phase matching from the break regions into the undulator must be accurate to better than 10 degrees. A phase change of 113 x 2{pi} must take place over a distance of 3.656 m centered on the undulator. Achieving these requirements is the goal of the tuning process. Most of the tuning is done with Hall probe measurements. The field integrals are checked using long coil measurements. An analysis program written in Matlab takes the Hall probe measurements and computes the trajectories, phase errors, K value, etc. The analysis program and its calculation techniques were described in a previous note. In this note, a second Matlab program containing tuning algorithms is described. The algorithms to determine the required number and placement of the shims are discussed in detail. This note describes the operation of a computer program which was written to automate LCLS ...
Date: December 3, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LCLS Undulator Fiducialization Plan

Description: This note presents the LCLS undulator fiducialization plan. The undulators will be fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage format are presented.
Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LCLS Undulator Test Plan

Description: This note presents the test plan for the LCLS undulators. The undulators will be measured and tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The requirements for tuning are well established and are summarized. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented. This is followed by the detailed test plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and storage format are presented. The LCLS consists of 33 undulator segments, hereafter referred to as undulators, plus 6 spares and one reference undulator. The undulators must be tuned to meet strict requirements. They must also be fiducialized to allow alignment with other components. This note details the plan for tuning and fiducializing the LCLS undulators. The note begins with the list of tuning and fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a detailed test plan in which all the steps of tuning and fiducialization are enumerated.
Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

Description: The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.
Date: November 23, 2010
Creator: Fisher, Andrew & Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Undulator Long Coil Measurement System Tests

Description: The first and second field integrals in the LCLS undulators must be below a specified limit. To accurately measure the field integrals, a long coil system is used. This note describes a set of tests which were used to check the performance of the long coil system. A long coil system was constructed to measure the first and second field integrals of the LCLS undulators. The long coil measurements of the background fields were compared to field integrals obtained by sampling the background fields and numerically calculating the integrals. This test showed that the long coil has the sensitivity required to measure at the levels specified for the field integrals. Tests were also performed by making long coil measurements of short magnets of known strength placed at various positions The long coil measurements agreed with the known field integrals obtained by independent measurements and calculation. Our tests showed that the long coil measurements are a valid way to determine whether the LCLS undulator field integrals are below the specified limits.
Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary & Levashov, Yurii
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reference Undulator Measurement Results

Description: The LCLS reference undulator has been measured 22 times during the course of undulator tuning. These measurements provide estimates of various statistical errors. This note gives a summary of the reference undulator measurements and it provides estimates of the undulator tuning errors. We measured the reference undulator many times during the tuning of the LCLS undulators. These data sets give estimates of the random errors in the tuned undulators. The measured trajectories in the reference undulator are stable and straight to within {+-}2 {micro}m. Changes in the phase errors are less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The phase advance in the cell varies by less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The rms variation between data sets of the first integral of B{sub x} is 9.98 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub x} is 17.4 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the first integral of B{sub y} is 6.65 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub y} is 12.3 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the x-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 35 {micro}m in the final production run This corresponds to an rms uncertainty in the K value of {Delta}K/K = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}. The rms variation of the y-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 4 {micro}m in the final production run.
Date: August 18, 2011
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; /SLAC & ,
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study of undulator magnets characterization using the Vibrating Wire technique

Description: The vibrating wire (VW) technique employs a stretched wire as a magnetic field sensor. Because of the wire's small diameter ({approx}0.1mm or smaller) and because the wire can be supported from outside the magnet, this technique is very appealing for field measurements in small gap/bore undulators with small good field regions and with limited access to the tested field. In addition, in the case of elliptical undulators in which Hall probe (HP) measurements can be affected by the planar Hall effect, VW technique can be used as an independent method to verify and supplement HP measurements. In this article we studied the potential of the VW technique for measurement of magnetic field errors and for prediction of beam trajectories in undulator magnets using a 3.8m long LCLS undulator as a test bench. Introducing calibrated magnetic field distortion at various locations, we measured the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the method. The method demonstrated 0.9mm spatial resolution at a distance up to a few meters and 0.37Gcm sensitivity to the field integral. To compare Hall probe and Vibrating wire measurements side-by-side, we measured field errors in an LCLS undulator previously characterized by Hall probe measurements. The field errors found with the Vibrating Wire technique appeared to be in good agreement with errors measured with the Hall probe. Beam trajectory distortions calculated from both data sets are also in a good agreement.
Date: February 7, 2011
Creator: Temnykh, Alexander; /Cornell U., LEPP; Levashov, Yurii; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC & ,
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LCLS Undulator Tuning And Fiducialization

Description: The LCLS project at SLAC requires 40 undulators: 33 in the beam line, 6 spares, and one reference undulator. A new facility was constructed at SLAC for tuning and fiducializing the undulators. The throughput of the facility must be approximately one undulator per week. The undulator tuning has been partially automated. Fiducialization techniques have been devised. The new facility, the tuning techniques, and the fiducialization techniques will be discussed.
Date: November 2, 2007
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Kaplounenko, Vsevolod; Levashov, Yury; Weidemann, Achim & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Undulator Changes Due to Temperature Excursions

Description: The temperature of the LCLS undulators has not been controlled during storage. The effects of the temperature excursions are documented in this note. After a number of LCLS undulators were tuned, fiducialized, and placed in storage anticipating their use, a test was made to ensure that their properties had not changed. The test revealed, however, that indeed the undulators had changed. Detailed study of this problem followed. We now believe that the gap of the undulators changes permanently when the undulators go through temperature excursions. We have tested the other possible cause, transportation, and do not see gap changes. In this note, we document how the undulators have changed since they were originally tuned. The undulators were tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Afterward, many of them (approximately 18) were taken to building 750 for storage during summer and fall 2007. Building 750 had no temperature control. The undulator temperatures went from 20 C, used for tuning, down to approximately 11 C during the winter. In January 2008, three of the undulators were brought back to the MMF for a check. All three undulators showed similar changes. Trajectories, phases, and most undulator properties stayed the same, but the fiducialization (beam axis position relative to tooling balls on the undulator) had changed. Further investigation showed that the undulator gap was altered in a periodic way along the magnetic axis with a net average gap change causing the fiducialization change. A new storage location in building 33 was found and future undulators were placed there. A failure in the temperature control, however, caused the undulators to get too hot. Again the gap changed, but with a different periodic pattern. This note documents the measured changes in the undulators. In particular, it shows the detailed history of undulator 39 which ...
Date: November 17, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii & Reese, Ed
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Rotating Coil Apparatus with Sub-Micrometer Magnetic Center Measurement Stability

Description: A rotating double coil apparatus has been designed and built so that the relative magnetic center change of a quadrupole is measured to an uncertainty smaller than 0.02 micrometers (=micron, {micro}m) for a single measurement. Furthermore, repeated measurements over about an hour vary by less than 0.1 {micro}m and by less than 1 {micro}m for periods of 24 hrs or longer. Correlation analyses of long data runs show that the magnet center measurement is sensitive to mechanical effects, such as vibration and rotating part wear, as well as to environmental effects, such as temperature and relative humidity. Evolving apparatus design has minimized mechanical noise and environmental isolation has reduced the effects of the surrounding environment so that sub-micron level measurement uncertainties and micron level stability have been achieved for multi-day measurement periods. Apparatus design evolution will be described in detail and correlation data taken on water-cooled electromagnet and adjustable permanent quadrupoles, which are about 350 mm in overall length, will be shown. These quads were prototypes for the linac quads of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) that had to meet the requirement that their magnetic centers change less than 1 micron during a 20% change in field strength. Thus it was necessary to develop an apparatus that could track the magnetic center with a fraction of a micron uncertainty.
Date: December 2, 2005
Creator: Spencer, Cherrill M.; Anderson, Scott, D.; Jensen, David R.; Wolf, Zachary R. & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LCLS Undulator Quadrupole Fiducialization Plan

Description: This note presents the fiducialization plan for the LCLS undulator quadrupoles. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage formats are presented. The LCLS is made up of 33 assemblies consisting of an undulator, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and other components mounted on a girder. The components must be mounted in such a way that the beam passes down the axis of each component. In this note, we describe how the ideal beam axis is related to tooling balls on the quadrupole. This step, called fiducialization, is necessary because the ideal beam axis is determined magnetically, whereas tangible objects must be used to locate the quadrupole. The note begins with the list of fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the methods used to perform the fiducialization and the methods used to check the results. A detailed fiducialization plan is presented in which all the steps of fiducialization are enumerated. A discussion of the resulting data files and directory structure concludes the note.
Date: November 24, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Michael; Lundahl, Eric; Reese, Ed; LeCocq, Catherine; Ruland, Robert et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetic Measurement Results of the LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles

Description: This note details the magnetic measurements and the magnetic center fiducializations that were performed on all of the thirty-six LCLS undulator quadrupoles. Temperature rise, standardization reproducibility, vacuum chamber effects and magnetic center reproducibility measurements are also presented. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator beam line has 33 girders, each with a LCLS undulator quadrupole which focuses and steers the beam through the beam line. Each quadrupole has main quadrupole coils, as well as separate horizontal and vertical trim coils. Thirty-six quadrupoles, thirty-three installed and three spares were, manufactured for the LCLS undulator system and all were measured to confirm that they met requirement specifications for integrated gradient, harmonics and for magnetic center shifts after current changes. The horizontal and vertical dipole trims of each quadrupole were similarly characterized. Each quadrupole was also fiducialized to its magnetic center. All characterizing measurements on the undulator quads were performed with their mirror plates on and after a standardization of three cycles from -6 to +6 to -6 amps. Since the undulator quadrupoles could be used as a focusing or defocusing magnet depending on their location, all quadrupoles were characterized as focusing and as defocusing quadrupoles. A subset of the undulator quadrupoles were used to verify that the undulator quadrupole design met specifications for temperature rise, standardization reproducibility and magnetic center reproducibility after splitting. The effects of the mirror plates on the undulator quadrupoles were also measured.
Date: August 18, 2011
Creator: Anderson, Scott; Caban, Keith; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reese, Ed & Wolf, Zachary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Undulator Transportation Test Results

Description: A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.
Date: November 17, 2010
Creator: Wolf, Zachary; Horton, Nick; Kharakh, David; Levashov, Yurii; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department