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Reducing VMTs through Transit-On-Demand with GPS and satellite communications

Description: As a partial solution to the problem of increasing foreign petroleum imports,urban congestion, and air pollution from automobiles, NREL researchers have successfully demonstrated a transportation concept called Transit-On-Demand (TOD). TOD uses the global positioning system (GPS) to locate all vehicles in a fleet, two-way communications between the vehicles and a central computer-server, and advanced dispatching and routing software to control the movement of vehicles within the fleet. Reducing the vehicle-miles-travelled (VMTs) through implementing efficient transportation systems such as TOD, results in less energy being required for transportation and a decrease in the amount of required imported petroleum. Through development of an advanced world wide web site and use of the new Java{trademark} Internet programming language, the demonstration allows visitors to the web site to see updates of vehicle position on a map every 20 seconds,while effectively minimizing the internet bandwidth required. The project demonstrates how a fixed-route, fixed- schedule shuttle can be converted to be demand-responsive to more effectively move people from where they are to where they want to be at the time they want to travel.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Wipke, K.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogen Technology Validation as a "Learning Demonstration" that Feeds the R&D Process (Presentation)

Description: This presentation, which provides information about how hydrogen technology validation is used as a learning demonstration that feeds the research and development process, was given at a National Hydrogen Association meeting in April 2004.
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Wipke, K.; Gronich, S. & Hooker, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EVALUATION OF RANGE ESTIMATES FOR TOYOTA FCHV-ADV UNDER OPEN ROAD DRIVING CONDITIONS

Description: The objective of this evaluation was to independently and objectively verify driving ranges of >400 miles announced by Toyota for its new advanced Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) utilizing 70 MPa compressed hydrogen. To accomplish this, participants from both Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) witnessed and participated in a 2-vehicle evaluation with Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. (TEMA) over a typical open road route for over 11 hours in one day with all relevant data recorded. SRNL and TEMA first entered into discussions of verifying the range of the advanced Toyota Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) in August 2008 resulting from reported 400+ mile range by Toyota. After extended negotiations, a CRADA agreement, SRNS CRADA No. CR-04-003, was signed on May 6, 2009. Subsequently, on June 30, 2009 SRNL and NREL participated in an all-day evaluation of the FCHV-adv with TEMA to determine the real-world driving range of this vehicle through on-road driving on an extended round-trip drive between Torrance and San Diego, California. SRNL and NREL observed the vehicles being refueled at Toyota's headquarters the day before the evaluation in Torrance, CA on June 29. At 8:00 AM on June 30, the vehicles departed Torrance north toward downtown Los Angeles, then west to the Pacific Coast Highway, and down to San Diego. After lunch the vehicles retraced their route back to Torrance. The traffic encountered was much heavier than anticipated, causing the vehicles to not return to Torrance until 9 PM. Each vehicle was driven by the same Toyota driver all day, with one SRNL/NREL observer in each vehicle the entire route. Data was logged by Toyota and analyzed by NREL. The maximum range of the FCHV-adv vehicles was calculated to be 431 miles under these driving conditions. This ...
Date: July 10, 2009
Creator: Anton, D.; Wipke, K. & Sprik, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors

Description: The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69% more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44% less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration. 8 refs.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Pesaran, A. A. & Wipke, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors

Description: The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69% more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44% less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration. 8 refs.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Pesaran, A. A. & Wipke, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National FCEV Learning Demonstration: Spring 2011 All Composite Data Products With Updates Through March 29, 2011

Description: This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes all the composite data products produced to date (with updates through March 29, 2011) as part of the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration.
Date: April 1, 2011
Creator: Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J. & Ramsden, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Learning Demonstration Progress Report -- September 2007

Description: This report documents the key results from the DOE Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration project. This project is also referred to as the fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure learning demonstration.
Date: November 1, 2007
Creator: Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J. & Thomas, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Data Collection & Analysis for ARRA Fuel Cell Projects (Presentation)

Description: The data analysis objectives are: (1) Independent assessment of technology, focused on fuel cell system and hydrogen infrastructure:performance, operation, and safety; (2) Leverage data processing and analysis capabilities from the fuel cell vehicle Learning Demonstration project and DoD Forklift Demo; (3) Establish a baseline of real-world fuel cell operation and maintenance data and identify technical/market barriers; (4) Support market growth of fuel cell technologies by reporting on technology features relevant to the business case; and (5) Report on technology to fuel cell and hydrogen communities and stakeholders.
Date: August 21, 2009
Creator: Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K. & Sprik, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Real World Fuel Cell Degradation (Presentation)

Description: Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its work with fuel cell vehicles, fuel cell early market demonstrations, and fuel cell bus demonstrations. This presentation includes results of composite data products and a summary of the analysis objectives and data flow for the projects.
Date: December 8, 2009
Creator: Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S. & Ramsden, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department