21 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

Description: Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.
Date: October 28, 2010
Creator: Davis, UC; Cappa, Christopher D. & Wilson, Kevin R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

Description: In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.
Date: May 12, 2008
Creator: Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid & Kostko, Oleg
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

Description: In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.
Date: April 24, 2008
Creator: Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R. & Ahmed, Musahid
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Imaging with Mass Spectrometry: A SIMS and VUV-Photoionization Study of Ion-Sputtered Atoms and Clusters from GaAs and Au

Description: A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As2, Au and Au2, are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered Asm (m=1,2) and Aun (n=1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by ~;;0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.
Date: December 5, 2008
Creator: Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R. & Ahmed, Musahid
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

Description: Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.
Date: March 14, 2010
Creator: Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid & Wilson, Kevin R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

Description: Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.
Date: March 11, 2010
Creator: Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R. & Ahmed, Musahid
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

Description: The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.
Date: October 3, 2011
Creator: Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean & Kroll, Jesse H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols

Description: A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.
Date: June 11, 2010
Creator: Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R. & Cohen, Ronald C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Discrete Dipole Approximation for Low-Energy Photoelectron Emission from NaCl Nanoparticles

Description: This work presents a model for the photoemission of electrons from sodium chloride nanoparticles 50-500 nm in size, illuminated by vacuum ultraviolet light with energy ranging from 9.4-10.9 eV. The discrete dipole approximation is used to calculate the electromagnetic field inside the particles, from which the two-dimensional angular distribution of emitted electrons is simulated. The emission is found to favor the particle?s geometrically illuminated side, and this asymmetry is compared to previous measurements performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By modeling the nanoparticles as spheres, the Berkeley group is able to semi-quantitatively account for the observed asymmetry. Here however, the particles are modeled as cubes, which is closer to their actual shape, and the interaction of an emitted electron with the particle surface is also considered. The end result shows that the emission asymmetry for these low-energy electrons is more sensitive to the particle-surface interaction than to the specific particle shape, i.e., a sphere or cube.
Date: September 22, 2011
Creator: Berg, Matthew J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Sorensen, Chris; Chakrabarti, Amit & Ahmed, Musahid
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A combined droplet train and ambient pressure photoemission spectrometer for the investigation of liquid/vapor interfaces

Description: We describe a combined ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy/droplet train apparatus for investigating the nature and heterogeneous chemistry of liquid/vapor interfaces. In this instrument a liquid droplet train with typical droplet diameters from 50...150 {micro}m is produced by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG). The droplets are irradiated by soft X-rays (100...1500 eV) in front of the entrance aperture of a differentially pumped electrostatic lens system that transfers the emitted electrons into a conventional hemispherical electron analyzer. The photoemission experiments are performed at background pressures of up to several Torr, which allows the study of environmentally important liquid/vapor interfaces, in particular aqueous solutions, under equilibrium conditions. The exposure time of the droplet surface to the background gases prior to the XPS measurement can be varied, which will allow future kinetic measurements of gas uptake on liquid surfaces. As an example, a measurement of the surface composition of a {chi} = 0.21 aqueous methanol solution is presented. The concentration of methanol at the vapor/liquid interface is enhanced by a factor of about 3 over the bulk value, while the expected bulk value is recovered at depths larger than about 1.5 nm.
Date: May 1, 2008
Creator: Starr, David E.; Wong, Ed K.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wilson, Kevin R. & Bluhm, Hendrik
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Revisiting the total ion yield x-ray absorption spectra of liquid water microjets

Description: Measurements of the total ion yield (TIY) x-ray absorption spectrum (XAS) of liquid water by Wilson et al. (2002 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 14 L221 and 2001 J. Phys. Chem. B 105 3346) have been revisited in light of new experimental and theoretical efforts by our group. Previously, the TIY spectrum was interpreted as a distinct measure of the electronic structure of the liquid water surface. However, our new results indicate that the previously obtained spectrum may have suffered from as yet unidentified experimental artifacts. Although computational results indicate that the liquid water surface should exhibit a TIY-XAS that is fundamentally distinguishable from the bulk liquid XAS, the new experimental results suggest that the observable TIY-XAS is actually nearly identical in appearance to the total electron yield (TEY-)XAS, which is a bulk probe. This surprising similarity between the observed TIY-XAS and TEY-XAS likely results from large contributions from x-ray induced electron stimulated desorption of ions, and does not necessarily indicate that the electronic structure of the bulk liquid and liquid surface are identical.
Date: February 16, 2008
Creator: Saykally, Richard J; Cappa, Chris D.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R. & Saykally, Richard J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: Application to low--temperature kinetics and product detection

Description: A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radicalneutralchemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has beendeveloped that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion withexcellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by theairfoil is negligible. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification basedon the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic ratesclose to the collision-determined limit.
Date: October 12, 2011
Creator: Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D.; Ferrell, Sarah J.; Leone, Stephen R. & Wilson, Kevin R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of fragmentation and functionalization pathways in the multistep heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosol

Description: The competition between the addition of polar, oxygen-containing functional groups (functionalization) and the cleavage of C-C bonds (fragmentation) has a governing influence on the change in volatility of organic species upon atmospheric oxidation, and hence on the loading of tropospheric organic aerosol. However the branching between these two channels is generally poorly constrained for oxidized organics. Here we determine functionalization/fragmentation branching ratios for organics spanning a range of oxidation levels, using the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane (C30H62) as a model system. Squalane particles are exposed to high concentrations of OH in a flow reactor, and measurements of particle mass and elemental ratios enable the determination of absolute elemental composition (number of oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen atoms) of the oxidized particles. At low OH exposures, the oxygen content of the organics increases, indicating that functionalization dominates, whereas at higher exposures the amount of carbon in the particles decreases, indicating the increasing importance of fragmentation processes. Once the organics are moderately oxidized (O/C~;;0.4), fragmentation completely dominates, and the increase in O/C ratio upon further oxidation is due to the loss of carbon rather than the addition of oxygen. These results suggest that fragmentation reactions may be key steps in the atmospheric formation and evolution of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA).
Date: March 10, 2009
Creator: Kroll, Jesse H.; Smith, Jared D.; Che, Dung L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Worsnop, Douglas R. & Wilson, Kevin R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reaction of the C2H radical with 1-butyne (C4H6): Low Temperature Kinetics and Isomer-Specific Product Detection

Description: The rate coefficient for the reaction of the ethynyl radical (C{sub 2}H) with 1-butyne (H-C{triple_bond}C-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 3}) is measured in a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus. Ethynyl radicals are formed by laser photolysis of acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) at 193 nm and detected via chemiluminescence (C{sub 2}H + O{sub 2} {yields} CH (A{sup 2}{Delta}) + CO{sub 2}). The rate coefficients are measured over the temperature range of 74-295 K. The C{sub 2}H + 1-butyne reaction exhibits no barrier and occurs with rate constants close to the collision limit. The temperature dependent rate coefficients can be fit within experimental uncertainties by the expression k = (2.4 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -10} (T/295 K)-(0.04 {+-} 0.03) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1}. Reaction products are detected at room temperature (295 K) and 533 Pa using a Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometer (MPIMS) coupled to the tunable VUV synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Two product channels are identified for this reaction: m/z = 64 (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}) and m/z = 78 (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) corresponding to the CH{sub 3}- and H-loss channels, respectively. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are used to analyze the isomeric composition of both product channels. The C{sub 5}H{sub 4} products are found to be exclusively linear isomers composed of ethynylallene and methyldiacetylene in a 4:1 ratio. In contrast, the C{sub 6}H{sub 6} product channel includes two cyclic isomers, fulvene 18({+-}5)% and 3,4-dimethylenecyclobut-1-ene 32({+-}8)%, as well as three linear isomers, 2-ethynyl-1,3-butadiene 8({+-}5)%, 3,4-hexadiene-1-yne 28({+-}8)% and 1,3-hexadiyne 14({+-}5)%. Within experimental uncertainties, we do not see appreciable amounts of benzene and an upper limit of 10% is estimated. Diacetylene (C{sub 4}H{sub 2}) formation via the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}-loss channel is also thermodynamically possible but cannot be observed due to experimental limitations. The implications of these results for modeling ...
Date: December 22, 2009
Creator: Soorkia, Satchin; Trevitt, Adam J.; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Wilson, Kevin R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

Description: The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.
Date: March 16, 2010
Creator: Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol

Description: The oxidative evolution (“aging”) of organic species in the atmosphere is thought to have a major influence on the composition and properties of organic particulate matter, but remains poorly understood, particularly for the most oxidized fraction of the aerosol. Here we measure the kinetics and products of the heterogeneous oxidation of highly oxidized organic aerosol, with an aim of better constraining such atmospheric aging processes. Submicron particles composed of model oxidized organics—1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}O{sub 8}), citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}), tartaric acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}), and Suwannee River fulvic acid—were oxidized by gas-phase OH in a flow reactor, and the masses and elemental composition of the particles were monitored as a function of OH exposure. In contrast to our previous studies of less-oxidized model systems (squalane, erythritol, and levoglucosan), particle mass did not decrease significantly with heterogeneous oxidation. Carbon content of the aerosol always decreased somewhat, but this mass loss was approximately balanced by an increase in oxygen content. The estimated reactive uptake coefficients of the reactions range from 0.37 to 0.51 and indicate that such transformations occur at rates corresponding to 1-2 weeks in the atmosphere, suggesting their importance in the atmospheric lifecycle of organic particulate matter.
Date: December 5, 2011
Creator: Kessler, Sean H.; Nah, Theodora; Daumit, Kelly E.; Smith, Jared D.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kolb, Charles E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved resolution of hydrocarbon structures and constitutional isomers in complex mixtures using Gas Chromatography-Vacuum Ultraviolet-Mass Spectrometry (GC-VUV-MS)

Description: Understanding the composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important for environmental studies in a variety of fields, but many prevalent compounds cannot be confidently identified using traditional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. This work uses vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) ionization to elucidate the structures of a traditionally"unresolved complex mixture" by separating components by GC retention time, tR, and mass-to-charge ratio, m/Q, which are used to determine carbon number, NC, and the number of rings and double bonds, NDBE. Constitutional isomers are resolved based on tR, enabling the most complete quantitative analysis to date of structural isomers in an environmentally-relevant hydrocarbon mixture. Unknown compounds are classified in this work by carbon number, degree of saturation, presence of rings, and degree of branching, providing structural constraints. The capabilities of this analysis are explored using diesel fuel, in which constitutional isomer distribution patterns are shown to be reproducible between carbon numbers and follow predictable rules. Nearly half of the aliphatic hydrocarbon mass is shown to be branched, suggesting branching is more important in diesel fuel than previously shown. The classification of unknown hydrocarbons and the resolution of constitutional isomers significantly improves resolution capabilities for any complex hydrocarbon mixture.
Date: September 13, 2011
Creator: Isaacman, Gabriel; Wilson, Kevin R.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Worton, David R.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Nah, Theodora et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved resolution of hydrocarbon structures and constitutional isomers in complex mixtures using Gas Chromatography-Vacuum Ultraviolet-Mass Spectrometry (GC-VUV-MS) (Supplementary Info)

Description: Understanding the composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important for environmental studies in a variety of fields, but many prevalent compounds cannot be confidently identified using traditional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. This work uses vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) ionization to elucidate the structures of a traditionally"unresolved complex mixture" by separating components by GC retention time, tR, and mass-to-charge ratio, m/Q, which are used to determine carbon number, NC, and the number of rings and double bonds, NDBE. Constitutional isomers are resolved based on tR, enabling the most complete quantitative analysis to date of structural isomers in an environmentally-relevant hydrocarbon mixture. Unknown compounds are classified in this work by carbon number, degree of saturation, presence of rings, and degree of branching, providing structural constraints. The capabilities of this analysis are explored using diesel fuel, in which constitutional isomer distribution patterns are shown to be reproducible between carbon numbers and follow predictable rules. Nearly half of the aliphatic hydrocarbon mass is shown to be branched, suggesting branching is more important in diesel fuel than previously shown. The classification of unknown hydrocarbons and the resolution of constitutional isomers significantly improves resolution capabilities for any complex hydrocarbon mixture.
Date: September 5, 2011
Creator: Aerosol Dynamics Inc.,; Aerodyne Research, Inc.,; Tofwerk AG, Thun, Switzerland; Isaacman, Gabriel; Wilson, Kevin R.; Chan, Arthur W. H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

Description: A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).
Date: November 5, 2010
Creator: Technology, Massachusetts Institute of; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

Description: We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.
Date: May 15, 2009
Creator: Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department