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Effects of an RTG power source on neutron spectroscopy measurements on the martian surface.

Description: A continuing goal of Mars science is to identify the exact locations of near-surface water and/or hydrated minerals using in situ measurements. Recent data from the Mars Odyssey mission has used both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy to measure large amounts of water ice near both polar regions . Furthermore, these data have also determined that in the mid-latitude regions, there likely exist relatively large amounts of hydrogen (-4-7 equivalent H2O wt.%), although it is not certain in which form this hydrogen exists . While these are exciting results, one drawback of these measurements is that they are averaged over a large (-400 km) footp ri nt and do not reflect any small (<1 km) inhomogenieties in hydrogen abundance that likely exist on the Martian surface. For any future in situ mission (e g, Mars Smart Lander (MSL)) that seeks to measure and characterize nearsurface H 2O, especially in the mid-latitude regions, is will be necessary to know th e locati ons of the H20.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Elphic, R. C. (Richard C.) & Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of an ultracompact neutron spectrometer for identifying near-surface water on mars.

Description: One of the major goals of the Mars science program is to identify exact locations of near-surface water or hydrated minerals on Mars. Evidence is mounting that Mars may have contemporary near-surface groundwater activity. Though very water-poor by terrestrial igneous standards, the SNC meteorivtes were found to contain evaporite minerals suggestive of groundwater activity within the past 1.3 Ga. More recently, the Mars Surveyor camera recorded images of geologically young seepage and outflow channels attributed to liquid water. The sources of these channels were suggested to be only a few hundred meters or less below the surface. If these channels are truly geologically young, thinly buried ice may still exist at the termination of these channels.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery); Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.); Moore, K. R. (Kurt R.) & Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the Mars Rover Program : elemental analysis at stand-off distances

Description: One of the most Fundamental pieces of information about any planetary body is the elemental cornposition of its surface materials. The Viking Martian landers employed XRF (x-ray fluorescence) and the MER rovers are carrying APXS (alpha-proton x-ray spectrometer) instruments upgraded from that used on the Pathfinder rover to supply elemental composition information for soils and rocks for which direct contact is possible. These in-situ analyses require that the lander or rover be in contact with the sample
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Cremers, D. A. (David A.); Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.); Arp, Z. A. (Zane A.); Harris, R. D. (Ronny D.) & Maurice, S. (Sylvestre)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characteristics of stand-off detection of geological samples at MARS atmospheric pressure using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

Description: LIBS has been proposed as a new method for stand-off detection of geological samples for use on landers and rovers to Mars and studies are on-going to determine capabilities. Because of the severe size, weight, ruggedness and power requirements for space instrumentation and the need to maximize scientific return, it is important to benchmark capabilities with parameters representative of compact instrumentation likely to be used in a flight instrument. Some of these issues are addressed here.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Cremers, D. A. (David A.); Arp, Z. A. (Zane A.); Knight, Andrew K.; Scherbarth, Nancy L.; Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.) & Maurice, S. (Sylvestre)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications of abundance data and requirements for cosmochemical modeling

Description: Understanding the evolution of the universe from Big Bang to its present state requires an understanding of the evolution of the abundances of the elements and isotopes in galaxies, stars, the interstellar medium, the Sun and the heliosphere, planets and meteorites. Processes that change the state of the universe include Big Bang nucleosynthesis, star formation and stellar nucleosynthesis, galactic chemical evolution, propagation of cosmic rays, spallation, ionization and particle transport of interstellar material, formation of the solar system, solar wind emission and its fractionation (FIP/FIT effect), mixing processes in stellar interiors, condensation of material and subsequent geochemical fractionation. Here, we attempt to compile some major issues in cosmochemistry that can be addressed with a better knowledge of the respective element or isotope abundances. Present and future missions such as Genesis, Stardust, Interstellar Pathfinder, and Interstellar Probe, improvements of remote sensing instrumentation and experiments on extraterrestrial material such as meteorites, presolar grains, and lunar or returned planetary or cometary samples will result in an improved database of elemental and isotopic abundances. This includes the primordial abundances of D, 3He, 4He, and 7Li, abundances of the heavier elements in stars and galaxies, the composition of the interstellar medium, solar wind and comets as well as the (highly) volatile elements in the solar system such as helium, nitrogen, oxygen or xenon.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Busemann, H.; Binns, W. R.; Chiappini, C.; Gloeckler, G.; Hoppe, P.; Kirilova, Donka et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Capabilities of LIBS for analysis of geological samples at stand-off distances in a Mars atmosphere

Description: The use of LIBS for stand-off elemental analysis of geological and other samples in a simulated Mars atmosphere is being evaluated. Analytical capabilities, matrix effects, and other factors effecting analysis are being determined. Through funding from NASA's Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP), we have been evaluating the use of LIBS for future use on landers and rovers to Mars. Of particular interest is the use of LIBS for stand-off measurements of geological samples up to 20 meters from the instrument. Very preliminary work on such remote LIBS measurements based on large laboratory type equipment was carried out about a decade ago. Recent work has characterized the capabilities using more compact instrumentation and some measurements have been conducted with LIBS on a NASA rover testbed.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Cremers, D. A. (David A.); Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.); Ferris, M. J. (Monty J.); Brennetot, R. (Rene) & Maurice, S. (Sylvestre)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measuring solar abundances

Description: This is the rapporteur paper of Working Group 2 on Measuring Solar Abundances. The working group presented and discussed the different observations and methods for obtaining the elemental and isotopic composition of the Sun, and critically reviewed their results and the accuracies thereof. Furthermore, a few important yet unanswered questions were identified, and the potential of future missions to provide answers was assessed.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Reisenfeld, D. B. (Daniel B.); Von Steiger, R. (Rudolf); Vial, J.-C. (Jean-Claude); Bochsler, P.; Chaussidon, M.; Cohen, C. M. S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of water ice and ice/dust mixtures using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

Description: In 1992, LIBS was proposed as a new method for stand-off detection of geological samples for use on landers and rovers to Mars. Recently, there has been increased interest in the technique for this and other space applications and studies have determined some of the characteristics and capabilities of the method under the conditions that these measurements will have to be made. In addition to rocks and soils, there is interest in using LIBS to analyze ices and dusts entrained in ice . This is especially true for missions to the Mars polar regions . Of particular interest is determining the nature of polar layered deposits, the geochemistry of polar surface materials, detection of water ice and the distribution of ice, and the presence of possible organics in these materials (via C/N ratios)
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Cremers, D. A. (David A.); Brown, Kari; Gibson, L. E. (Leslie E.); Ferris, M. J. (Monty J.); Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.) & Maurice, S. (Sylvestre)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evidence of water ice near the lunar poles

Description: Lunar Prospector epithermal neutron data were studied to evaluate the probable chemical state of enhanced hydrogen, [H], reported previously to be near both lunar poles [1,2]. Improved versions of thermal and epithermal neutron data were developed for this purpose. Most important is the improved spatial resolution obtained by using shortened integration times. A new data set was created, Epi* = [Epithermal - 0.057 x Thermal], to reduce effects of composition variations other than those due to hydrogen. The Epi* counting rates are generally low near both lunar poles and high over terrane near recent impact events such as Tycho and Jackson. However, other lunar features are also associated with high Epi* rates, which represent a wide range of terrane types that seem to have little in common. If we postulate that one property all bright Epi* features do have in common is low [H], then measured Epi* counting rates appear to be quantitatively self consistent. If we assume that [H]=O above the top 98th percentile of Epi* counting rates at 2{sup o} x 2{sup o} spatial resolution, then [H]{sub ave} = 55 ppm for latitudes equatorward of [75{sup o}]. This value is close to the average found in returned lunar soil samples, [H]{sub ave} {approx} 50 ppm [3]. Using the foregoing physical interpretation of Epi* counting rates, we find that the Epi* counts within most of the large craters poleward of {+-}70{sup o} are higher, and therefore [H] is lower, than that in neighboring inter-crater plains, as shown in Figure 1. Fourteen of these craters that have areas larger than the LP epithermal spatial resolution (55 km diameter at 30 km altitude), were singled out for study. [H] is generally found to increase with decreasing distance from the poles (hence decreasing temperature). However, quantitative estimates of the diffusivity of hydrogen ...
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Maurice, S. (Sylvestre); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Little, R. C. (Robert C.); Lawrence, S. L. (Stefanie L.); Gasnault, O. M. (Olivier M.) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department