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Technical Review Report for the Justification for 9975 Gram Based Content Envelopes, C.10 and C.11

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) desires to ship Model 9975-85 and Model 9975-96 Packages loaded with Pu/U metal and Pu/U oxide materials as identified in new Content Envelopes C.10 and C.11. The new Content Envelopes C.10 and C.11 consist of radioisotopes and impurities that are similar to the existing C.3, Pu/U metal, and C.4, Pu/U oxide, Content Envelopes but that list the radioisotopes as gram values in lieu of the existing weight percent of radioactive material mass values listed for the C.3 and C.4 Content Envelopes. Authorization for shipment requires acceptance of this report by the DOE-Headquarters (HQ) Certifying Official (EM-10/EM-2) as an Addendum to WSRC-SA-2002-00008, Revision 0, S-SARA-G-00001, Addendum 1, Revision 0, and S-SARA-G-00002 Addendum 2, Revision 1, of the Model 9975-85 Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). This Addendum also applies to S-SARP-G-00003, Revision 0, of the Model 9975-96 Package SARP. These documents are collectively referred to as the existing Model 9975 Package SARP. The safety basis described addresses specific supplements to the currently approved safety basis. Justification is made for shipping the new Content Envelopes C.10 and C.11 under this Addendum. Following acceptance of this Addendum by EM-10/EM-2 and subsequent revision to the current Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), the new contents will be authorized for shipment in the Model 9975 Package. The new Content Envelopes will be incorporated into the next revision to the Model 9975-85 and Model 9975-96 Package SARPs.
Date: September 28, 2009
Creator: West, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Review Report for the Model 9975-96 Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (S-SARP-G-00003, Revision 0, January 2008)

Description: This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Staff, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Model 9975, Revision 0, dated January 2008 (S-SARP-G-00003, the SARP). The review includes an evaluation of the SARP, with respect to the requirements specified in 10 CFR 71, and in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1. The Model 9975-96 Package is a 35-gallon drum package design that has evolved from a family of packages designed by DOE contractors at the Savannah River Site. Earlier package designs, i.e., the Model 9965, the Model 9966, the Model 9967, and the Model 9968 Packagings, were originally designed and certified in the early 1980s. In the 1990s, updated package designs that incorporated design features consistent with the then newer safety requirements were proposed. The updated package designs at the time were the Model 9972, the Model 9973, the Model 9974, and the Model 9975 Packagings, respectively. The Model 9975 Package was certified by the Packaging Certification Program, under the Office of Safety Management and Operations. The safety analysis of the Model 9975-85 Packaging is documented in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Model 9975, B(M)F-85, Revision 0, dated December 2003. The Model 9975-85 Package is certified by DOE Certificate of Compliance (CoC) package identification number, USA/9975/B(M)F-85, for the transportation of Type B quantities of uranium metal/oxide, {sup 238}Pu heat sources, plutonium/uranium metals, plutonium/uranium oxides, plutonium composites, plutonium/tantalum composites, {sup 238}Pu oxide/beryllium metal.
Date: May 22, 2009
Creator: West, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pyrochemical investigations into recovering plutonium from americium extraction salt residues

Description: Progress into developing a pyrochemical technique for separating and recovering plutonium from spent americium extraction waste salts has concentrated on selective chemical reduction with lanthanum metal and calcium metal and on the solvent extraction of americium with calcium metal. Both techniques are effective for recovering plutonium from the waste salt, although neither appears suitable as a separation technique for recycling a plutonium stream back to mainline purification processes. 17 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: May 1, 1987
Creator: Fife, K.W. & West, M.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Review Report for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Model 9977 S-SARP-G-00001 Revision 2

Description: This Technical Review Report (TRR) summarizes the review findings for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Model 9977 B(M)F-96 shipping container. The content analyzed for this submittal is Content Envelope C.1, Heat Sources, in assemblies of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators or food-pack cans. The SARP under review, i.e., S-SARP-G-00001, Revision 2 (August 2007), was originally referred to as the General Purpose Fissile Material Package. The review presented in this TRR was performed using the methods outlined in Revision 3 of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Packaging Review Guide (PRG) for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packages. The format of the SARP follows that specified in Revision 2 of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's, Regulatory Guide 7.9, i.e., Standard Format and Content of Part 71 Applications for Approval of Packages for Radioactive Material. Although the two documents are similar in their content, they are not identical. Formatting differences have been noted in this TRR, where appropriate. The Model 9977 Package is a 35-gallon drum package design that has evolved from a family of packages designed by DOE contractors at the Savannah River Site. The Model 9977 Package design includes a single, 6-inch diameter, stainless steel pressure vessel containment system (i.e., the 6CV) that was designed and fabricated in accordance with Section III, Subsection NB, of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code. The earlier package designs, i.e., the Model 9965, 9966, 9967 and 9968 Packages, were originally designed and certified in the 1980s. In the 1990s, updated package designs that incorporated design features consistent with new safety requirements, based on International Atomic Energy Agency guidelines, were proposed. The updated package designs were the Model 9972, 9973, 9974 and 9975 Packages, respectively. The Model 9975 Package was certified by the Packaging Certification Program, under the Office of ...
Date: October 4, 2007
Creator: DiSabatino, A; Hafner, R & West, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermodynamics of the conversion of calcium and magnesium fluorides to the parent metal oxides and hydrogen fluoride

Description: The authors have used thermodynamic modeling to examine the reaction of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) with water (H{sub 2}O) at elevated temperatures. The calculated, equilibrium composition corresponds to the global free-energy minimum for the system. Optimum, predicted reaction temperatures and reactant mole ratios are reported for the recovery of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a valuable industrial feedstock. Complete conversion of MgF{sub 2} is found at 1,000 C and a ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of MgF{sub 2}. For CaF{sub 2}, temperatures as high as 1,400 C are required for complete conversion at a corresponding mole ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of CaF{sub 2}. The authors discuss the presence of minor chemical constituents as well as the stability of various potential container materials for the pyrohydrolysis reactions at elevated temperatures. CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} slags are available as wastes at former uranium production facilities within the Department of Energy Complex and other facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recovery of HF from these wastes is an example of environmental remediation at such facilities.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: West, M.H. & Axler, K.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gallium interactions with Zircaloy

Description: This study focuses on the effects of gallium ion implantation into zircaloy cladding material to investigate the effects that gallium may have in a reactor. High fluence ion implantation of Ga ions was conducted on heated Zircaloy-4 in the range of 10{sup 16}--10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm2. Surface effects were studied using SEM and electron microprobe analysis. The depth profile of Ga in the Zircaloy was characterized with Rutherford backscattering and SIMS techniques. Results indicate that the Zirc-4 is little affected up to a fluence of 10{sup 17} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation of 10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}, sub-grain features on the order of 2 {micro}m were observed which may be due to intermetallic compound formation between Ga and Zr. For the highest fluence implant, Ga content in the Zirc-4 reached a saturation value of between 30 and 40 atomic %; significant enhanced diffusion was observed but gallium was not seen to concentrate at grain boundaries.
Date: January 1, 1999
Creator: Woods, A. L. & West, M. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Review Report for the Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum No. 1, through Revision b

Description: This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the 'Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Addendum No. 1, Revision b', dated May 2007 (Addendum 1). The Mound 1KW Package is certified by DOE Certificate of Compliance (CoC) number USA/9516/B(U)F-85 for the transportation of Type B quantities of plutonium heat source material. The safety analysis of the package is documented in the 'Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Mound 1KW Package' (i.e., the Mound 1KW SARP, or the SARP). Addendum 1 incorporates a new fueled capsule assembly payload. The following changes have been made to add this payload: (1) The primary containment vessel (PCV) will be of the same design, but will increase in height to 11.16 in.; (2) A new graphite support block will be added to support up to three fueled capsule assemblies per package; (3) The cutting groove height on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) will be heightened to accommodate the taller PCV; and (4) A 3.38 in. high graphite filler block will be placed on top of the PCV. All other packaging features, as described in the Mound 1KW SARP [3], remain unchanged. This report documents the LLNL review of Addendum 1[1]. The specific review for each SARP Chapter is documented herein.
Date: October 4, 2007
Creator: DiSabatino, A; West, M; Hafner, R & Russell, E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhanced work planning for reduction in landlord costs

Description: The cost of Landlord services constitutes a major portion of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) budget. In order to place more resources in the area of actual remediation and cleanup, the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) has established a new enhanced work planning initiative through the Integrated Safe Shutdown, Waste Management, and Landlord (ISWL) Project Team. The ISWL Project Team is a planning and coordination group which meets weekly at no additional cost to the DOE; actual field work is funded and implemented through the remedial or operational projects. The purpose of this team is to address issues that will facilitate safe shutdown and/or reduction of utilities in facilities thereby decreasing the infrastructure costs and increasing integration/advanced planning between Waste Management, Safe Shutdown, and Landlord Programs. The ISWL Project Team is the key planning and integration link for near term (one month to one year) integration activities. The ISWL Team is planning for the coordination of integration activities which must be completed to support and facilitate the FEMP`s (1) Safe Shutdown Program, (2) Utility Reduction Program, (3) Waste Programs Management, (4) remediation of all FEMP structures, and (5) ongoing remediation projects.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Miller, L.K.; Houser, S.M.; Paine, D. & West, M.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of the neutron self-interrogation approach for assay of plutonium in high-. cap alpha. ,n materials

Description: Neutron self-interrogation is a proposed method for assay of plutonium in bulk materials with very high ..cap alpha..,n activity. The simple assay approach assumes that neutron multiplication for the calibration standards is the same as that for the bulk items. Efforts to use bulk properties to determine corrections to the calibration for changing multiplication have been initiated. Self-interrogation assays of bulk pyrochemical residues have been performed. Comparison with tag values obtained by difference gives poor agreement. Comparison with tag values obtained by dissolution and destructive analysis gives agreement at the 10% (1sigma) level with no corrections for changing package dimensions or matrix amounts. The agreement improves by a factor of 2 or more if a bulk correction factor (derived from a packaging/matrix study with standards) is applied.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Russo, P.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Fife, K.W.; West, M.H. & Miller, B.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The removal of uranium from acidic media using ion exchange and/or extraction chromatography

Description: The separation and purification of uranium from either nitric acid or hydrochloric acid media can be accomplished by using either solvent extraction or ion-exchange. Over the past two years at Los Alamos, emerging programs are focused on recapturing the expertise required to do limited, small-quantity processing of enriched uranium. During this period of time, we have been investigating ion-addition, waste stream polishing is associated with this effort in order to achieve more complete removal of uranium prior to recycle of the acid. Extraction chromatography has been demonstrated to further polish the uranium from both nitric and hydrochloric acid media thus allowing for a more complete recovery of the actinide material and creation of less waste during the processing steps.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: FitzPatrick, J.R.; Schake, B.S.; Murphy, J.; Holmes, K & West, M.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal

Description: Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I{sub 2}) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF{sub 4}, spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C. & Appert, Q.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Applications of Gamma Spectroscopy: Characterization Tools for D&D Process Development, Inventory Reduction Planning & Shipping, Safety Analysis & Facility Management During the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program

Description: Novel applications of gamma ray spectroscopy for D&D process development, inventory reduction, safety analysis and facility management are discussed in this paper. These applications of gamma spectroscopy were developed and implemented during the Risk Reduction Program (RPP) to successfully downgrade the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. Non-destructive assay in general, gamma spectroscopy in particular, were found to be important tools in project management, work planning, and work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected''), minimizing worker dose, and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. Inventory reduction activities utilized gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy inventory, ingrowth of daughter products and the presence of process impurities; quantify inventory; prioritize work activities for project management; and to supply information to satisfy shipper/receiver documentation requirements. D&D activities utilize in-situ gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy contamination; quantify contamination levels and monitor the progress of decontamination efforts; and determine the point of diminishing returns in decontaminating enclosures and glove boxes containing high specific activity isotopes such as {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu. In-situ gamma spectroscopy provided quantitative comparisons of several decontamination techniques (e.g. TLC-free Stripcoat{trademark}, Radiac{trademark} wash, acid wash, scrubbing) and was used as a part of an iterative process to determine the appropriate level of decontamination and optimal cost to benefit ratio. Facility management followed a formal, rigorous process utilizing an independent, state certified, peer-reviewed gamma spectroscopy program, in conjunction with other characterization techniques, process knowledge, and historical records, to provide information for work planning, work prioritization, work control, and safety analyses (e.g. development of hold points, stop work points); and resulted in B251 successfully achieving Radiological status on schedule. Gamma spectroscopy helped to define operational approaches to achieve ...
Date: January 23, 2006
Creator: Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Gray, L; Vellinger, R; West, M; Gaylord, R et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gallium interactions with zircaloy cladding

Description: The effects of Ga from weapons-grade plutonium MOX fuel on zircaloy-IV cladding during power reactor operation have been simulated by implantations of 100 keV Ga-69 ions into a polished zircaloy-IV sample while the sample was maintained at a typical cladding temperature of 375{degrees}C. Analyses were based on scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering of 280 keV He-3 ions, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Subgrains at the zircaloy-IV surface formed at a Ga fluence equivalent to total release of approximately 12 ppm by weight of Ga from the fuel. The subgrains may be an intermetallic compound of Zr{sub 2}Ga. Enhanced diffusion of Ga was observed, but Ga concentrations decreased 3 orders of magnitude over a depth of 3000 {angstrom}.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Hart, R. R.; Rennie, J.; Aucoin, K. & West, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The XMM Cluster Survey: A Massive Galaxy Cluster at z = 1.45

Description: We report the discovery of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738, a massive galaxy cluster at z = 1.45, which was found in the XMM Cluster Survey. The cluster candidate was initially identified as an extended X-ray source in archival XMM data. Optical spectroscopy shows that 6 galaxies within a {approx}60 arcsec diameter region lie at z = 1.45 {+-} 0.01. Model fits to the X-ray spectra of the extended emission yield kT = 7.4{sub -1.8}{sup +2.7} keV (90% confidence); if there is an undetected central X-ray point source then kT = 6.5{sub -1.8}{sup +2.6} keV. The bolometric X-ray luminosity is L{sub x} = 4.4{sub -0.6}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup 44} ergs s{sup -1} over a 2 Mpc radial region. The measured T{sub x}, which is the highest for any known cluster at z > 1, suggests that this cluster is relatively massive for such a high redshift. The redshift of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 is the highest currently known for a spectroscopically-confirmed cluster of galaxies.
Date: May 24, 2006
Creator: Stanford, S A; Romer, A K; Sabirli, K; Davidson, M; Hilton, M; Viana, P P et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department