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Delta-t protocol specification: working draft

Description: This document is one of a series describing protocols associated with the Livermore Interactive Network Communication System (LINCS) hierarchical architecture. At the heart of LINCS is its basic interprocess communication (LINCS-IPC) service. LINCS-IPC defines a reliable, flow controlled, full duplex, uninterpreted, labeled bit stream communication service. LINCS-IPC is level 4 in the LINCS architecture. Level 3 of LINCS is the Network layer defining an internetwork datagram type service. LINCS-IPC interfaces to User processes that utilize higher level syntactic and semantic conventions for process interaction. The transport service provided by the Delta-t protocol can be considered a sublayer of the LINCS-IPC layer. Delta-t augments the Network level service as required to support LINCS-IPC. This document specifies the services provided by the Delta-t protocol to support LINCS-IPC, the operation of Delta-t, and the services Delta-t requires of the Network level. This document was written to be self-contained but the reader will find it useful to have available for reference the LINCS-IPC and LINCS DeltaGram Network layer protocol specifications. Implementations are underway in Pascal for the PDP-11 running under RT11 and RX11, in BLISS for the VAX running under VMS, in MODEL for the CRAY-1 and CDC 7600 running under NLTSS and LTSS, and for the SEL 32/75 running under PORT.
Date: December 4, 1981
Creator: Watson, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The parallel I/O architecture of the high performance storage system (HPSS). Revision 1

Description: Datasets up to terabyte size and petabyte capacities have created a serious imbalance between I/O and storage system performance and system functionality. One promising approach is the use of parallel data transfer techniques for client access to storage, peripheral-to-peripheral transfers, and remote file transfers. This paper describes the parallel I/O architecture and mechanisms, Parallel Transport Protocol (PTP), parallel FTP, and parallel client Application Programming Interface (API) used by the High Performance Storage System (HPSS). Parallel storage integration issues with a local parallel file system are also discussed.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Watson, R.W. & Coyne, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An experimental and theoretical study to relate uncommon rock/fluid properties to oil recovery. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

Description: The major objective this quarter was to develop new empirical mercury recovery efficiency and permeability correlations to improve the accuracy of estimating behavior of fluid flow through various layers of limestone reservoir rock.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Watson, R.W.; Ertekin, T. & Owolabi, O.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The parallel I/O architecture of the High Performance Storage System (HPSS)

Description: Rapid improvements in computational science, processing capability, main memory sizes, data collection devices, multimedia capabilities and integration of enterprise data are producing very large datasets (10s-100s of gigabytes to terabytes). This rapid growth of data has resulted in a serious imbalance in I/O and storage system performance and functionality. One promising approach to restoring balanced I/O and storage system performance is use of parallel data transfer techniques for client access to storage, device-to-device transfers, and remote file transfers. This paper describes the parallel I/O architecture and mechanisms, Parallel Transport Protocol, parallel FIP, and parallel client Application Programming Interface (API) used by the High Performance Storage System (HPSS). Parallel storage integration issues with a local parallel file system are also discussed.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Watson, R.W. & Coyne, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Enterprise Information Architecture: A Case Study for Decentralized Organizations

Description: As enterprises become increasingly information based, making improvements in their information activities is a top priority to assure their continuing competitiveness. A key to achieving these improvements is developing an Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA). An EIA can be viewed as a structured set of multidimensional interrelated elements that support all information processes. The current ad hoc EIAs in place within many enterprises can not meet their future needs because of a lack of a coherent framework, incompatibilities, missing elements, few and poorly understood standards, uneven quality and unnecessary duplications. This paper discusses the EIA developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a case study, for other information based enterprises, particularly those with decentralized and autonomous organization structures and cultures. While the architecture is important, the process by which it is developed and sustained over time is equally important. This paper outlines the motivation for an EIA and discusses each of the interacting elements identified. It also presents an organizational structure and processes for building a sustainable EIA activity.
Date: June 15, 1999
Creator: Watson, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Enterprise Information Architecture: A Case Study for Decentralized Organizations

Description: As enterprises become increasingly information based, making improvements in their information activities is a top priority to assure their continuing competitiveness. A key to achieving these improvements is developing an Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA). An EIA can be viewed as a structured set of multidimensional interrelated elements that support all information processes. The current ad hoc EIAs in place within many enterprises can not meet their future needs because of a lack of a coherent framework, incompatibilities, missing elements, few and poorly understood standards, uneven quality and unnecessary duplications. This paper discusses the EIA developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a case study, for other information based enterprises, particularly those with decentralized and autonomous organization structures and cultures. While the architecture is important, the process by which it is developed and sustained over time is equally important. This paper outlines the motivation for an EIA and discusses each of the interacting elements identified. It also presents an organizational structure and processes for building a sustainable EIA activity.
Date: September 28, 1999
Creator: Watson, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection of Shielded Nuclear Material in a Cargo Container

Description: The Idaho National Laboratory, along with Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, are developing electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technologies for the detection of shielded nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This paper describes a developing prototypical cargo container inspection system utilizing the Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) technology, incorporates interchangeable, well-defined, contraband shielding structures (i.e., "calibration" pallets) providing realistic detection data for induced radiation signatures from smuggled nuclear material, and provides various shielded nuclear material detection results. Using a 4.8-kg quantity of depleted uranium, neutron and gamma-ray detection responses are presented for well-defined shielded and unshielded configurations evaluated in a selected cargo container inspection configuration. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved
Date: June 1, 2005
Creator: Jones, J. L.; Norman, D. R.; Haskell, K. J.; Sterbentz, J. W.; Yoon, W. Y.; Watson, S. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technique: CY 04 Year-end Progress Report

Description: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), along with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), are developing an electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technology for the detection of smuggled nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This CY04 report describes the latest developments and progress with the development of the Pulsed, Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) nuclear material inspection ystem, such as: (1) the identification of an optimal range of electron beam energies for interrogation applications, (2) the development of a new “cabinet safe” electron accelerator (i.e., Varitron II) to assess “cabinet safe-type” operations, (3) the numerical and experimental validation responses of nuclear materials placed within selected cargo configurations, 4) the fabrication and utilization of Calibration Pallets for inspection technology performance verification, 5) the initial technology integration of basic radiographic “imaging/mapping” with induced neutron and gamma-ray detection, 6) the characterization of electron beam-generated photon sources for optimal performance, 7) the development of experimentallydetermined Receiver-Operator-Characterization curves, and 8) several other system component assessments. This project is supported by the Department of Homeland Security and is a technology component of the Science & Technology Active Interrogation Portfolio entitled “Photofission-based Nuclear Material Detection and Characterization.”
Date: May 1, 2005
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Yoon, W.Y.; Haskell, K.J.; Norman, D.R.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technique: CY-05 Project Summary Report

Description: Idaho National Laboratory, along with Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center and Los Alamos National Laboratory, is developing an electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technology, called the Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) system, for the detection of nuclear material concealed within air-, rail-, and, primarily, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This report summarizes the advances and progress of the system’s development in 2005. The contents of this report include an overview of the prototype inspection system, selected Receiver-Operator-Characteristic curves for system detection performance characterization, a description of the approach used to integrate the three major detection components of the PPA inspection system, highlights of the gray-scale density mapping technique being used for significant shield material detection, and higher electron beam energy detection results to support an evaluation for an optimal interrogating beam energy. This project is supported by the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development and, more recently, the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Jones, J.L.; Bennett, B.D.; Haskell, K.J.; Johnson, J.T.; Norman, D.R.; Sterbentz, J.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department