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INERTIAL PRESSURE AND VOID FORMATION: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

Description: A wave equation for the pressure in a mixture of water and gas bubbles (such as found in the KEWB Reactor) is derived. The driving force may be either the production of additional bubbles or the growth of existent bubbles. Several illustrative solutions to the wave equation are found. (W.L.H.)
Date: May 25, 1960
Creator: Warner, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GAS DIFFUSION INTO A BUBBLE OF FIXED RADIUS

Description: The problem of radiolytic gas diffusion into a bubble of fixed radius is solved. A constant source of radiolytic gas is assumed. The concentration of gas at the bubble surface is related to the pressure within the bubble by Henry's constant. (W. L.H.)
Date: July 15, 1960
Creator: Warner, C. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

Description: The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described.
Date: July 1, 1979
Creator: Warner, C.L. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos controlled-air incineration studies

Description: Current regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require that PCBs in concentrations greater than 500 ppM be disposed of in EPA-permitted incinerators. Four commercial incineration systems in the United States have EPA operating permits for receiving and disposing of concentrated PCBs, but none can accept PCBs contaminated with nuclear materials. The first section of this report presents an overview of an EPA-sponsored program for studying PCB destruction in the large-scale Los Alamos controlled-air incinerator. A second major FY 1983 program, sponsored by the Naval Weapons Support Center, Crane, Indiana, is designed to determine operating conditions that will destroy marker smoke compounds without also forming polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), some of which are known or suspected to be carcinogenic. We discuss the results of preliminary trial burns in which various equipment and feed formulations were tested. We present qualitative analyses for PAHs in the incinerator offgas as a result of these tests.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Koenig, R.A. & Warner, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of a Net-Metering and PV Exhibit for the 2005 Solar Decathlon

Description: In the 2005 Solar Decathlon competition, 19 collegiate teams will design, build, and operate grid-independent homes powered by photovoltaic (PV) arrays on the National Mall. The prominence of grid-interconnected systems in the marketplace has provided the impetus for the development of a net-metering exhibit to be installed and operated during the competition. The exhibit will inform the visiting public about PV basics and appropriate alternatives to grid-independent systems. It will consist of four interactive components. One will be designed to educate people about the principles of net metering using a small PV array, a grid-interactive inverter, and a variable load. Additional components of the exhibit will demonstrate the effects of orientation, cloud cover, and nighttime on performance. The nighttime component will discuss appropriate storage options for different applications.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Wassmer, M. & Warner, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar Decathlon 2005

Description: Solar Decathlon 2005 is a U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory competition involving 19 colleges and universities from the United States, Canada, and Spain. These teams will compete to design, build, and demonstrate solar homes. In fall 2005, teams will transport their competition solar houses to Washington, D.C., where they will construct a solar village on the National Mall. When the houses are assembled, the teams will compete against each other in 10 contests (hence, a decathlon) for about a week. The contests range from design to comfort to energy performance. Each team must provide an aesthetically pleasing entry that produces sufficient solar energy for space conditioning, hot water, lighting, appliances, and an electric car. The Solar Decathlon is co-sponsored by BP, The Home Depot, the American Institute of Architects, the National Association of Home Builders, and the DIY Network. For more information, visit the Web site at www.solardecathlon.org.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Warner, C.; Nahan, R. & King, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review

Description: Solar Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review is a technical report describing the 2005 Solar Decathlon, an event sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy wherein 18 collegiate teams competed in 10 contests to design, build, and operate an attractive, efficient, entirely solar-powered home. The report gives an overview of the competition, including final results, team strategies, and detailed descriptions the 18 homes.
Date: June 1, 2006
Creator: Moon, S.; Nahan, R.; Warner, C. & Wassmer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Second Annual Technical Summary Report for Basic Research in Thermionic Energy Conversion. Covering Period November 1, 1961 to October 31, 1962

Description: Results of work in a continuing program to investigate basic processes in thermionic energy conversion related to thermionic nuclear power plants for naval applications are reported. The areas in which progress is reported include statistical mechanics of Cs adsorption, space charge analysis for low pressure thermionic diodes, emission requirements for removal of space charge barriers, unignited mode of thermionic converters, interpretation of volt-ampere characteristics, vaporization and deposition at Cs-covered surfaces, and Cs purification. (auth)
Date: November 1, 1962
Creator: Warner, C., III; Hansen, L. K.; Hori, H. & McKisson, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for hazardous chemical and mixed radioactive wastes

Description: The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is currently the only radioactive waste incineration facility in the US permitted to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The CAI was developed in the mid-1970's as a demonstration system for volume reduction of transuranic (TRU) contaminated combustible solid wastes. It has since undergone additions and modifications to accommodate hazardous chemical wastes in response to a need within the Department of Energy (DOE) to treat mixed radioactive/chemical wastes. An overview of these additions which include a liquid feed system, a high intensity liquid injection burner, and an activated carbon adsorption unit is presented here. Also included is a discussion of the procedures required for Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the CAI.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.; Hutchins, D.A.; Koenig, R.A. & Warner, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos controlled air incinerator upgrade for TRU/mixed waste operations

Description: The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is undergoing a major process upgrade to accept Laboratory-generated transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed wastes on a production basis. In the interim,prior to the scheduled 1992 operation of a new on-site LLW/mixed waste incinerator, the CAI will also be accepting solid and liquid low-level mixed wastes. This paper describes major modifications that have been made to the process to enhance safety and ensure reliability for long-term, routine waste incineration operations. The regulatory requirements leading to operational status of the system are also briefly described. The CAI was developed in the mid-1970s as a demonstration system for volume reduction of TRU combustible solid wastes. It continues as a successful R and D system well into the 1980s during which incineration tests on a wide variety of radioactive and chemical waste forms were performed. In 1985, a DOE directive required Los Alamos to reduce the volume of its TRU waste prior to ultimate placement in the geological repository at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). With only minor modifications to the original process flowsheet, the Los Alamos CAI was judged capable of conversion to a TRU waste operations mode. 9 refs., 1 fig.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.; Hutchins, D.A.; Warner, C.L. & Thompson, T.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design reference manual

Description: This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.
Date: October 1, 1982
Creator: Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M. & Warner, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Controlled-air incineration studies at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

Description: An overview of the LASL controlled-air incineration (CAI) program is provided through a description of the process, a summary of component selection and system design criteria, a statement of project status, and discussion of experimental and process improvement study plans. The results of the program will be used to formulate the design criteria and operating parameters for a production model controlled-air transuranic (TRU) waste incineration system and govern the construction and operation of a facility for this purpose. The objective of the LASL CAI project is to develop and demonstrate an effective, safe, and reliable process for volume reduction and chemical stabilization of TRU solid wastes using proven technology whenever possible. The benefits of this process will be realized in reduced handling and storage hazards potentials, lower packaging, transportation, and storage expenses, less storage space requirements, and fewer monitoring needs.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Borduin, L.C.; Neuls, A.S.; Thompson, T.K. & Warner, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance assessment of refractory samples in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator

Description: A refractory evaluation project was initiated in 1979 to study the performance of six selected refractory materials within the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI). Determining refractory resistance to thermal shock, chemical attack, and plutonium uptake was of particular interest. The experimental refractories were subjected to a variety of waste materials, including transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes, highly chlorinated compounds and alkaline metal salts of perchlorate, chlorate, nitrate and oxylate, over the six year period of this study. Results of this study to date indicate that the use of high alumina, and possibly specialty plastic refractories, is advisable for the lining of incinerators used for the thermal destruction of diverse chemical compounds. 12 refs., 4 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Hutchins, D.A.; Borduin, L.C.; Koenig, R.A.; Vavruska, J.S. & Warner, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations

Description: This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.
Date: August 1, 1982
Creator: Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M. & Warner, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Locations, volumes, and characteristics of DOE's mixed low-level wastes

Description: The Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP) has collected and analyzed mixed low-level waste data to assist in developing treatment capability for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) wastes. Initial data on the characteristics of mixed waste was obtained from the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) data base, and has been updated based on visits to DOE sites where most of the wastes are generated and stored. The streams of interest have a current inventory of about 70,000 m{sup 3} and a generation rate of about 7,700 m{sup 3}/yr. The twelve sites with the most significant processing needs are Fernald, Hanford, K-25 (Oak Ridge), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, Savannah River Site (SRS), and Y-12 (Oak Ridge). These twelve sites account for about 98% of the mixed waste volumes. The wastes have been assigned to specific waste characterization categories. The largest category in current interim storage is inorganic solids, with sludges, filter cakes, and residues the largest specific subcategory. Aqueous liquids are the largest currently generated stream. The other large categories are solid organics, metals wastes, and heterogeneous wastes. Organic liquids, which have been a major focus, are the smallest of the categories.
Date: March 1, 1992
Creator: Ross, W.A.; Elmore, M.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Warner, C.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Wachter, L.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). HAZWRAP Support Contractor Office); Carlson, W.L. & Devries, R.L. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department