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DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and computational Biology/Bioinformatics

Description: The overall goal of the DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and Computational Biology was to enhance the competiveness of Vermont research in these scientific areas. To develop self-sustaining infrastructure, we increased the critical mass of faculty, developed shared resources that made junior researchers more competitive for federal research grants, implemented programs to train graduate and undergraduate students who participated in these research areas and provided seed money for research projects. During the time period funded by this DOE initiative: (1) four new faculty were recruited to the University of Vermont using DOE resources, three in Computational Biology and one in Structural Biology; (2) technical support was provided for the Computational and Structural Biology facilities; (3) twenty-two graduate students were directly funded by fellowships; (4) fifteen undergraduate students were supported during the summer; and (5) twenty-eight pilot projects were supported. Taken together these dollars resulted in a plethora of published papers, many in high profile journals in the fields and directly impacted competitive extramural funding based on structural or computational biology resulting in 49 million dollars awarded in grants (Appendix I), a 600% return on investment by DOE, the State and University.
Date: February 21, 2008
Creator: Wallace, Susan S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structure/Function Analysis of DNA-glycosylases That Repair Oxidized Purines and Pyrimidines and the Influence of Surrounding DNA Sequence on Their Interactions

Description: The overall goal of this project was to elucidate the structure/function relationships between oxidized DNA bases and the DNA repair enzymes that recognize and remove them. The NMR solution structure of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) that recognizes oxidized DNA purines was to be determined. Furthermore, the solution structures of DNA molecules containing specific lesions recognized by Fpg was to be determined in sequence contexts that either facilitate or hinder this recognition. These objectives were in keeping with the long-term goals of the Principal Investigator's laboratory, that is, to understand the basic mechanisms that underpin base excision repair processing of oxidative DNA lesions and to elucidate the interactions of unrepaired lesions with DNA polymerases. The results of these two DNA transactions can ultimately determine the fate of the cell. These objectives were also in keeping with the goals of our collaborator, Dr. Michael Kennedy, who is studying the repair and recognition of damaged DNA. Overall the goals of this project were congruent with those of the Department of Energy's Health Effects and Life Sciences Research Program, especially to the Structural Biology, the Human Genome and the Health Effects Programs. The mission of the latter Program includes understanding the biological effects and consequences of DNA damages produced by toxic agents in the many DOE waste sites so that cleanup can be accomplished in a safe, effective and timely manner.
Date: August 22, 2005
Creator: Wallace, Susan S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department