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Phosphate Bonded Solidification of Radioactive Incinerator Wastes

Description: The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.
Date: April 13, 1999
Creator: Walker, B. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Melton Valley Storage Tanks Waste Filtration Process Evaluation

Description: Cross-flow filtration is being evaluated as a pretreatment in the proposed treatment processes for aqueous high-level radioactive wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to separate insoluble solids from aqueous waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST).
Date: December 7, 1998
Creator: Walker, B.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement

Description: The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.
Date: April 19, 2000
Creator: Walker, B.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stabilization of high and low solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) waste with super cement

Description: This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies with the High and Low Solid waste streams. Ceramicrete and Super Cement technologies were chosen as the best possible replacement solidification candidates for the waste streams generated by the SRS incinerator from a list of several suggested Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies. These technologies were tested, evaluated, and compared to the current Portland cement technology being employed. Recommendation of a technology for replacement depends on waste form performance, process flexibility, process complexity, and cost of equipment and/or raw materials.
Date: January 11, 2000
Creator: Walker, B.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permanganate Degradation of Reillex HPQ Ion Exchange Resin for Use in HB-Line

Description: This study evaluated the use of Reillex TM HPQ resin as a replacement for the Ionac A-641 resin currently authorized for use in H B-Line. The study concentrated on the ability of the existing alkaline permanganate digestion process to convert spent resin for disposal.
Date: June 2, 1999
Creator: Walker, B. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) Wastes Stabilization with Ceramicrete and Super Cement

Description: High Solids ash and scrubber solution waste streams were generated at the incinerator facility at SRS by burning radioactive diatomaceous filter rolls which contained small amounts of uranium, and listed solvents (F and U). This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) technologies with the High Solids waste streams.
Date: September 14, 1999
Creator: Walker, B.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeability of Consolidated Incinerator Facility Wastes Stabilized with Portland Cement

Description: The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and off-gas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as waste water. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solution that do not meet the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).
Date: August 23, 1999
Creator: Walker, B.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford phosphate precipitation filtration process evaluation

Description: The purpose of this filter study was to evaluate cross-flow filtration as effective solid-liquid separation technology for treating Hanford wastes, outline operating conditions for equipment, examine the expected filter flow rates, and determine proper cleaning. A proposed Hanford waste pre-treatment process uses sodium hydroxide at high temperature to remove aluminum from sludge. This process also dissolves phosphates. Upon cooling to 40 degrees centigrade the phosphates form a Na7(PO4)2F9H2O precipitate which must be removed prior to further treatment. Filter studies were conducted with a phosphate slurry simulant to evaluate whether 0.5 micron cross-flow sintered metal Mott filters can separate the phosphate precipitate from the wash solutions. The simulant was recirculated through the filters at room temperature and filtration performance data was collected.
Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Walker, B.W. & McCabe, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford underground storage tank waste filtration process evaluation

Description: The purpose of this filter study was to evaluate cross-flow filtration as effective solid-liquid separation technology for treating Hanford wastes, outline operating conditions for equipment, examine the expected filter flow rates, and determine proper cleaning. Two Hanford waste processing applications have been identified as candidates for the use of cross-flow filtration. The first of the Hanford applications involves filtration of the decanted supernate from sludge leaching and washing operations. This process involves the concentration and removal of dilute (0.05 wt percent) fines from the bulk of the supernate. The second application involves filtration to wash and concentrate the sludge during out-of-tank processing. This process employs a relatively concentrated (8 wt percent) solids feed stream. Filter studies were conducted with simulants to evaluate whether 0.5 micron cross-flow sintered metal Mott filters and 0.1 micron cross-flow Graver filters can perform solid-liquid separation of the solid/liquid waste streams effectively. In cross-flow filtration the fluid to be filtered flows in parallel to the membrane surface and generates shearing forces and/or turbulence across the filter medium. This shearing influences formation of filter cake stabilizing the filtrate flow rate.
Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Walker, B.W. & McCabe, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Melton Valley Storage Tanks Waste filtration process evaluation

Description: The purpose of this filter study was to evaluate cross-flow filtration as effective solid-liquid separation technology for treating Oak Ridge National Laboratory wastes, outline operating conditions for equipment, examine the expected filter flow rates, and determine proper cleaning.The Gunite Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory contain heels which are a mixture of sludge, wash water, and bentonite clay. The tanks are to be cleaned out with a variety of flushing techniques and the dilute mixture transferred to another storage tank. One proposal is to transfer this mixture into existing Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST), which already contain a large amount of sludge and supernate. The mixed aqueous phase will then be transferred to new MVST, which are prohibited from containing insoluble solids. To separate the solid from the liquid and thereby prevent solids transfer into the new MVST, a technique is needed that can cleanly separate the sludge and bentonite clay from the supernate. One proposed method for solid liquid separation is cross-flow filtration. Cross-flow filtration has been used at the Savannah River and West Valley sites for treatment of tank waste, and is being tested for applicability at other sites. The performance of cross-flow filters with sludge has been tested, but the impact of sludge combined with bentonite clay has not. The objective of this test was to evaluate the feasibility of using cross-flow filters to perform the solid liquid separation required for the mixture of Gunite and MVST tank wastes.
Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Walker, B.W. & McCabe, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Salt disposition alternatives filtration at SRTC

Description: Several of the prospective salt disposition alternative technologies require a monosodium titanate (MST) contact to remove strontium and actinides from inorganic salt solution feedstock. This feedstock also contains sludge solids from waste removal operations and may contain defoamers added in the evaporator systems. Filtration is required to remove the sludge and MST solids before sending the salt solution for further processing. This report describes testing performed using the Parallel Theological Experimental Filter (PREF). The PREF contains two single tube Mott sintered metal crossflow filters. For this test one filter was isolated so that the maximum velocities could be achieved. Previous studies showed slurries of MST and sludge in the presence of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) were filterable since the NaTPB slurry formed a filter cake which aided in removing the smaller MST and sludge particles. Some of the salt disposition alternative technologies do not use NaTPB raising the question of how effective crossflow filtration is with a feed stream containing only sludge and MST. Variables investigated included axial velocity, transmembrane pressure, defoamer effects, and solids concentration (MST and sludge). Details of the tests are outlined in the technical report WSRC-RP-98-O0691. Key conclusions from this study are: (1) Severe fouling of the Mott sintered metal filter did not occur with any of the solutions filtered. (2) The highest fluxes, in the range of .46 to 1.02 gpm/f{sup 2}, were obtained when salt solution decanted from settled solids was fed to the filter. These fluxes would achieve 92 to 204 gpm filtrate production for the current ITP filters. The filtrate fluxes were close to the flux of 0.42 gpm/f{sup 2} reported for In Tank Precipitation Salt Solution by Morrisey. (3) For the range of solids loading studied, the filter flux ranged from .04 to .17 gpm/f{sup 2} which would result in a filtrate ...
Date: January 27, 2000
Creator: Walker, B. W. & Hobbs, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cross-Flow Filtration of Department of Energy Hanford Waste Streams Using Sintered Metal Mott and Graver Filters at the Savannah River Technology Center

Description: Treatment processes have been proposed that will utilize cross-flow filtration to filter supernate and concentrated sludge waste streams at a Department of Energy plant in Hanford, Washington. Two waste processing applications have been identified as candidates for this technology. The first of the Hanford applications involves filtration of the decanted supernate from sludge leaching and washing operations. This process requires the concentration and removal of dilute fines from the bulk of the supernate. The second application involves filtration to wash and concentrate the sludge during out-of-tank processing of a relatively concentrated solids feed stream.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Walker, B.W. & McCabe, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phosphate bonded solidification of radioactive incinerator wastes

Description: The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.
Date: December 3, 1999
Creator: Walker, B. W.; Langton, C. A. & Singh, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Trinidad Quadrangle, Colorado

Description: From Introduction: "The Trinidad Quadrangle, Colorado, was evaluated to identify geologic units and to delineate areas that exhibit characteristics favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. All geologic environments were evaluated by means of surface investigations and subsurface data to a depth of 1500 m."
Date: June 1982
Creator: Johnson, V. C.; McCarn, D. W.; Kocis, D. E.; Walker, B. W. & Reinhart, W. R.
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department