Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.
open access

Food Safety Issues in the 106th Congress

Description: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released in September new estimates showing that each year in the United States 76 million people get sick, 325,000 are hospitalized, and 5,000 die from food-related illnesses. Food-borne illness is a serious public health problem. Often, people do not seek medical help and their illness is not officially reported. Yet, consumers have become aware of the serious consequences of illnesses linked to a growing variety of foods, produced domestically or imported. Consumers want the government to regulate the food supply, and industry is interested in producing foods that are safe at a reasonable price. As a result there is congressional interest in oversight and legislation in this area.
Date: November 7, 2000
Creator: Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The Delaney Clause: The Dilemma of Regulating Health Risk for Pesticide Residues

Description: Under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for establishing tolerances for pesticide residues in or on foods and feeds. Tolerances are legal limits to the amount of pesticide residues that can be found on a raw agricultural commodity at the farm gate or in a processed food. The FFDCA has two sections, 408 and 409, which set up different and inconsistent criteria for setting tolerances for pesticide residues in foods.
Date: November 9, 1992
Creator: Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The Delaney Dilemma: Regulating Pesticide Residues in Foods -- Seminar Proceedings, March 16, 1993

Description: A provision in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, the Delaney Clause, appears to lower risks in the setting of tolerances for pesticide residues. It prohibits any substance from being added to processed foods if it induces cancer in man or animals. In reality, the provision created a dilemma because the zero-risk statute makes it difficult to regulate pesticides. Because of the prescription of Delaney, tolerances (legal limits) are established differently for carcinogens and non-carcinogens and in raw and processed foods.
Date: May 19, 1993
Creator: Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Food Safety Issues in the 107th Congress

Description: This report gives an overview of food safety issues in the 107th Congress. It briefly discusses the president's several food safety initiatives and describes requested resources for federal funding and for cooperation among federal agencies involved in food safety activities.
Date: November 7, 2001
Creator: Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Food Additive Regulations: A Chronology

Description: The 104th Congress is actively debating proposals to reform several aspects of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) process for regulating consumer products, including its approval process for food additives. In June 1995, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced at a House Government Reform and Oversight Subcommittee hearing several policy shifts in its food additive pre-market approval process which will soon be implemented.
Date: September 13, 1995
Creator: Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Prescription Drugs

Description: The Direct-to-Consumer advertising of perscription drugs by pharmaceutical companies has been described as any promotional effort with respect to these drugs that targets the general public through the lay media. This report contains information on growth in spending on direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising, the impact of such advertising, the FDA's existing authority to regulate such advertising, funding, and legislative issues.
Date: March 25, 2005
Creator: Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Food Biotechnology in the United States: Science, Regulation, and Issues

Description: This report discusses the science of food biotechnology, and the federal structure by which it is regulated. Because U.S. farmers are adopting this technology at a rapid rate, some observers advocate a more active role for the federal government to ensure that farmers have equal access to this technology. Others believe that federal officials should play a more active role in protecting the environment, funding more research, and participating in international trade negotiations to ensure that trade continues to expand for genetically engineered crops. Trading partners often label food products that have been genetically modified as genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Many of those partners have labeling requirements for GMOs to allow consumers the “right to know” their food content.
Date: January 19, 2001
Creator: Vogt, Donna U. & Parish, Mickey
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Food Biotechnology in the United States: Science, Regulation, and Issues

Description: This report provides basic information on the science of food biotechnology. It discusses regulatory policies and issues of concern about the use of biotechnology to modify foods through genetic engineering. It describes the scientific processes used and current products available. It explains how all three major federal agencies - the Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Environmental Protection Agency - regulate these foods.
Date: June 2, 1999
Creator: Vogt, Donna U. & Parish, Mickey
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Importing Prescription Drugs: Objectives, Options, and Outlook

Description: This report provides an overview about the Objectives, Options, and Outlook on Importing Prescription Drugs.it also examines the issues,spells out how they are treated from bill to bill, and refer to alternatives to important to ease the burden of prescription drug.
Date: December 8, 2005
Creator: Thaul, Susan & Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Food Safety Agencies and Authorities: A Primer

Description: Several federal agencies, in cooperation with state governments, are responsible for regulating the safety of the U.S. food supply. In the wake of an outbreak of foodborne illness and the largest recall of suspected contaminated meat in U.S. history in August 1997, several policymakers have reopened the debate on creating a single, independent, federal food safety agency. They assert that this would provide more effective regulatory control over the entire farm-to-table food production and marketing system by eliminating the overlapping and occasionally competing for objectives of multiple agencies. As background for further discussion on this and related food safety issues, this report describes the roles of the primary federal and cooperating state agencies responsible for food safety and enumerates the major legislative authorities currently governing them.
Date: February 5, 1998
Creator: Rawson, Jean M. & Vogt, Donna U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Labeling of Genetically Modified Foods

Description: Congressional interest in the labeling of genetically modified foods (GM foods) has been rising. So far, two bills have been introduced to mandate that all foods from genetically modified crops (GM crops) be labeled as such. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued its current GM food labeling policy in May 1992. At that time, the agency determined that it would regulate GM foods no differently than foods created by conventional means because FDA considered them substantially equivalent to traditional foods and decided that no special label would be needed. In the intervening period, extensive public debate surrounding the genetic modification of foods has led some consumers to call for labeling of such products. A label would permit customers to choose to avoid purchasing or consuming them. Others oppose labeling because to make such labels "truthful and not misleading" all commodities would need to be segregated and tested, and the label would not have room to impart information that could not be distributed in other ways. The federal government's role in regulating these foods is explained in CRS report RL30198, Food Biotechnology in the United States: Science, Regulation, and Issues. This report focuses specifically on views surrounding the labeling of GM foods. It will be updated periodically as new legislative proposals are introduced.
Date: March 20, 2000
Creator: Vogt, Donna U. & Jackson, Brian A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Back to Top of Screen