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Comparisons of the DSPEC and DSPEC Plus spectrometer systems

Description: A previous experimental evaluation of nine commercial gamma-ray spectroscopy systems demonstrated significant benefits of digital signal processing for improvements in the performance of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. Spectacular improvements in the energy resolution and throughput of germanium detectors were demonstrated for the DSPEC. Recently, a new, improved version of DSPEC, the DSPEC Plus, was developed. Results of the performance of the DSPEC Plus are compared to those of the DSPEC.
Date: November 1, 1999
Creator: Vo, Duc T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Generalization of the FRAM's Bias

Description: The Fixed-Energy Response-Function Analysis with Multiple Efficiency (FRAM) code was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the gamma-ray spectrometry of the isotopic composition of plutonium, uranium, and other actinides. Its reported uncertainties of the results come from the propagation of the statistics in the peak areas only. No systematic error components are included in the reported uncertainties. We have done several studies and found that the FRAM's statistical precision can be reasonably represented by its reported uncertainties. The FRAM's biases or systematic uncertainties can come from a variety of sources and can be difficult to determine. We carefully examined the FRAM analytical results of the archival plutonium data and of the data specifically acquired for this isotopic uncertainty analysis project and found the relationship between the bias and other parameters. We worked out the equations representing the biases of the measured isotopes from each measurement using the internal parameters in the spectrum such as peak resolution and shape, region of analysis, and burnup (for plutonium) or enrichment (for uranium).
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Vo, Duc T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FRAM isotopic analysis of uranium in thick-walled containers using high energy gamma rays and planar HPGe detectors.

Description: We describe the use of the Los Alamos FRAM isotopic analysis software to make the first reported measurements on thick-walled UF{sub 6} cylinders using small planar HPGe detectors of the type in common use at the IAEA. Heretofore, planar detector isotopic analysis measurements on uranium have used the 100-keV region and can be defeated by 10 mm of steel absorber. The analysis of planar detector measurements through 13-16 mm of steel shows that FRAM can successfully carry out these measurements and analysis in the 120-1024 keV energy range, a range previously thought to be the sole province of more efficient coaxial detectors. This paper describes the measurement conditions and results and also compares the results to other FRAM measurements with coaxial HPGe detectors. The technique of gamma-ray isotopic analysis of arbitrary samples is desirable for measuring the isotopic composition of uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders because it does not require calibration with standards or knowledge of the cylinder wall thickness. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses the MGAU (Multi Group Analysis Uranium) uranium isotopic analysis software with planar high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to measure the isotopic composition of uranium. Measurements on UF{sub 6} cylinders with 13-16-mm thick steel walls are usually unsuccessful because of the strong absorption of the 89-100 keV gamma rays and x-rays that MGAU requires for the measurement. This paper describes the use of the Los Alamos FRAM isotopic analysis software to make these measurements on UF{sub 6} cylinders. Uranium measurements with FRAM typically cover the energy range from 120-1001 keV and can easily be made through the walls of UF{sub 6} cylinders. While these measurements are usually performed with efficient coaxial HPGe detectors, this paper reports the first successful measurements using small planar HPGe detectors of the type in common use at the IAEA.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Sampson, Thomas E.; Hypes, P. A. (Philip A.) & Vo, Duc T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing the plutonium isotopic analysis code FRAM with various CdTe detectors.

Description: The isotopic analysis code Fixed-energy Response-function Analysis with Multiple efficiency (FRAM)1,2 has been proven to successfully analyze plutonium spectra taken with a portable CdTe detector with Peltier cooling, the first results of this kind for a noncryogenic detector.3 These are the first wide-range plutonium gamma-ray isotopics analysis results obtained with other than Ge spectrometers. The CdTe spectrometer measured small plutonium reference samples in reasonable count times, covering the range from low to high burnup. This paper describes further testing of FRAM with two CdTe detectors of different sizes and resolutions using different analog and digital, portable multichannel analyzers (MCAs).
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Vo, Duc T. & Russo, P. A. (Phyllis A.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

plutonium isotopic analysis in the 30 KeV to 210 KeV range

Description: Low-Energy Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (LEGS) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique developed in the 1980s. In 1999, it was modified to include a physical-based model for the energy dependent efficiency. It uses the gamma rays in the energy range from approximately 30 keV to 210 keV, except the 100-keV region. This energy region provides intense, well-separated gamma rays from the principal isotopes of plutonium. For applications involving small quantities (mg to g) of freshly separated plutonium in various chemical forms, it is ideally suited for accurate real-time or near real-time isotopic analysis. Since the last modification, LEGS has been incorporated into the FRAM code (Fixed-energy Response-function Analysis with Multiple efficiency), version 4. FRAM v4 is capable of analyzing the peaks in the whole energy range from 30 keV to 1 MeV, including the X-ray region. The new capability of analyzing the peaks in the 100-keV region greatly enhances the plutonium analysis in the 30 keV to 2 10 keV ranges of the traditional LEGS. We now can analyze both the freshly separated and aged plutonium with greater accuracy.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Vo, Duc T. & Li, T. K. (Tien K.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PLUTONIUM ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS WITH FRAM V4 IN THE LOW ENERGY REGION.

Description: Low-Energy Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (LEGS) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique developed in the 1980s. In 1999, it was modified to include a physical-based model for the energy dependent efficiency. It uses the gamma rays in the energy range from approximately 30 keV to 210 keV, except the 100-keV region. This energy region provides intense, well-separated gamma rays from the principal isotopes of plutonium. For applications involving small quantities (mg to g) of freshly separated plutonium in various chemical forms, it is ideally suited for accurate real-time or near real-time isotopic analysis. Since the last modification, LEGS has been incorporated into the FRAM code (Fixed-energy Response-function Analysis with Multiple efficiency), version 4. FRAM v4 is capable of analyzing the peaks in the whole energy range from 30 keV to 1 MeV, including the X-ray region. The new capability of analyzing the peaks in the 100-keV region greatly enhances the plutonium analysis in the 30 keV to 210 keV ranges of the traditional LEGS. We now can analyze both the freshly separated and aged plutonium with greater accuracy.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Vo, Duc T. & Li, T. K. (Tien K.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Extended Evaluations of the Commercial Spectrometer Systems for Safeguards Applications

Description: Safeguards applications require the best of the spectrometer system with excellent resolution, stability, and throughput. Instruments must perform well in all situations and environments. Data communication to the computer should be convenient, fast, and reliable. The software should have all the necessary tools and be easy to use. Portable systems should be small in size, lightweight, and have a long battery life. Nine commercially available spectrometer systems are tested with five different germanium detectors. Considering the performance of the Digital Signal Processors (DSP), digital-based spectroscope y may become the way of future gamma-ray spectroscopy.
Date: August 1, 1999
Creator: Vo, Duc T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium Isotopic Analysis with the FRAM Isotopic Analysis Code

Description: FRAM is the acronym for Fixed-energy Response-function Analysis with Multiple efficiency. This software was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory originally for plutonium isotopic analysis. Later, it was adapted for uranium isotopic analysis in addition to plutonium. It is a code based on a self-calibration using several gamma-ray peaks for determining the isotopic ratios. The versatile-parameter database structure governs all facets of the data analysis. User editing of the parameter sets allows great flexibility in handling data with different isotopic distributions, interfering isotopes, and different acquisition parameters such as energy calibration and detector type.
Date: May 1, 1999
Creator: Vo, Duc T. & Sampson, Thomas E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing the Ortec's Isotopic and Eberlines Snap software for Uranium waste measurements

Description: Uranium enrichment plants normally generate lots of wastes. The wastes are in various matrices such as clothing, glass, concrete, aluminum, and steel, etc. They are in the quantity of a few grams to many kilograms and generally stored in 55-gallon drums. For accountability, it is important to determine the amount of uranium in the waste drums to a certain level of accuracy. There are several commercially available systems that can accurately determine the uranium mass in the waste drums, such as Tomographic-Gamma-Scanner1 (TGS) or Segmented Gamma-Ray Scanner2 (SGS). However, those systems are too cumbersome and expensive. Cheap and simple single detector systems are also available commercially from several companies. The workhorse of these systems is the software, which would work with any germanium detector system. We mocked up waste drums containing several hundred grams to several kilograms of uranium with different isotopic compositions in various matrices. We acquired data using a coaxial germanium detector. We tested two different software codes from two companies, the Ortec's Isotopic software and the Eberline's Snap software. The results with the germanium detector were very encouraging, which led us to test with the NaI detectors. The NaI detectors have much worse resolution than the germanium detectors. However, they are very cheap, can be very large in detector size and, thus, efficient for a given counting time, and are simpler because of not requiring liquid nitrogen for cooling. The results, advantages, and disadvantages of the two software codes and the two detector systems will be discussed.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Vo, Duc T.; Seo, P. N. (Pil-Neyo) & Li, T. K. (Tien K.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

APPROACHING CRYOGENIC GE PERFORMANCE WITH PELTIER COOLED CDTE

Description: A new class of hand-held, portable spectrometers based on large area (lcm2) CdTe detectors of thickness up to 3mm has been demonstrated to produce energy resolution of between 0.3 and 0.5% FWHM at 662 keV. The system uses a charge loss correction circuit for improved efficiency, and detector temperature stabilization to ensure consistent operation of the detector during field measurements over a wide range of ambient temperature. The system can operate continuously for up to 8hrs on rechargeable batteries. The signal output from the charge loss corrector is compatible with most analog and digital spectroscopy amplifiers and multi channel analyzers. Using a detector measuring 11.2 by 9.1 by 2.13 mm3, we have recently been able to obtain the first wide-range plutonium gamma-ray isotopic analysis with other than a cryogenically cooled germanium spectrometer. The CdTe spectrometer is capable of measuring small plutonium reference samples in about one hour, covering the range from low to high burnup. The isotopic analysis software used to obtain these results was FRAM, Version 4 from LANL. The new spectrometer is expected to be useful for low-grade assay, as well as for some in-situ plutonium gamma-ray isotopics in lieu of cryogenically cooled Ge.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Khusainov, A. K. (A. Kh.); Iwanczyk, J. S. (Jan S.); Patt, B. E. (Bradley E.); Prirogov, A. M. (Alexandre M.) & Vo, Duc T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department