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Circulating water subsystem design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant

Description: The Circulating Water System is a subsystem within the Heat Rejection Group (HRG). The Circulating Water System consists of two independent loops to remove waste heat from the turbine building closed cooling water system and from the condensers associated with each turbine generator set. In normal plant operation circulating water is pumped from the cooling tower basin through the condensers and heat exchangers and back to the cooling tower where the waste heat is released to the atmosphere via mechanical draft cooling towers. The system consists of two flow paths with two half-size, vertical pumps associated with each path.
Date: June 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USA/FRG umbrella agreement for cooperation in GCR [Gas Cooled Reactor] development: Fuel, fission products and graphite subprogram. Part 1, Management meeting report: Part 2, Revised subprogram plan, Revision 10

Description: This Subprogram Plan describes cooperative work in the areas of HTR fuel and graphite development and fission product studies that is being carried out under US/FRG/Swiss Implementing Agreement for cooperation in Gas Cooled Reactor development. Only bilateral US/FRG cooperation is included, since it is the only active work in this subprogram area at this time. The cooperation has been in progress since February 1977. A number of Project Work Statements have been developed in each of the major areas of the subprogram, and work on many of them is in progress. The following specific areas are included in the scope of this plan: fuel development; graphite development; fission product release; and fission product behavior outside the fuel elements.
Date: May 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplement analysis 2 of environmental impacts resulting from modifications in the West Valley Demonstration Project

Description: The West Valley Demonstration Project, located in western New York, has approximately 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in storage in underground tanks. While corrosion analysis has revealed that only limited tank degradation has taken place, the failure of these tanks could release HLW to the environment. Congress requires DOE to demonstrate the technology for removal and solidification of HLW. DOE issued the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) in 1982. The purpose of this second supplement analysis is to re-assess the 1982 Final Environmental Impact Statement's continued adequacy. This report provides the necessary and appropriate data for DOE to determine whether the environmental impacts presented by the ongoing refinements in the design, process, and operations of the Project are considered sufficiently bounded within the envelope of impacts presented in the FEIS and supporting documentation.
Date: June 23, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report on the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel alternatives cost study

Description: Initial estimates of costs for the interim management and disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) were developed during preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The Task Team evaluated multiple alternatives, assessing programmatic, technical, and schedule risks, and generated life-cycle cost projections for each alternative. The eight technology alternatives evaluated were: direct co-disposal; melt and dilute; reprocessing; press and dilute; glass material oxidation dissolution system (GMODS); electrometallurgical treatment; dissolve and vitrify; and plasma arc. In followup to the Business Plan that was developed to look at SNF dry storage, WSRC prepared an addendum to the cost study. This addendum estimated the costs for the modification and use of an existing (105L) reactor facility versus a greenfield approach for new facilities (for the Direct Co-Disposal and Melt and Dilute alternatives). WSRC assessed the impacts of a delay in reprocessing due to the potential reservation of H-Canyon for other missions (i.e., down blending HEU for commercial use or the conversion of plutonium to either MOX fuel or an immobilized repository disposal form). This report presents the relevant results from these WSRC cost studies, consistent with the most recent project policy, technology implementation, canyon utilization, and inventory assumptions. As this is a summary report, detailed information on the technical alternatives or the cost assumptions raised in each of the above-mentioned cost studies is not provided. A comparison table that briefly describes the bases used for the WSRC analyses is included as Appendix A.
Date: December 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLWnotes - Volume 11, Number 3

Description: This document is the April 1996 issue of LLWnotes. It contains articles and news items on the following topics: news items related to states and compacts, Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Forum activities, and court rulings and calendars. State and compact items featured include Texas licensing procedures, renewal of Envirocare`s license, and Ward Valley. Massachusetts Board suspension of some siting tasks and Massachusetts Court rules for US DOE regarding rebates are also reported.
Date: April 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reports of Jupiter II: Measurements and analysis

Description: This report provides the reaction rate measurements and analyses and the basic data for reaction rate measurements for ZPPR-13C in: The high [sup 240]Pu zone of ZPPR-13C; The high-heavy-metal-volume- fraction zone;The pin zone; The [sup 235]U fuel zone; and the enriched uranium zone. In-cell reaction rate measurements and cell factors for the zone studies in ZPPR Assembly 13C are provided.
Date: December 31, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLWnotes - Volume 11, Number 6 August/September 1996

Description: This document is the August/September 1996 issue of LLWnotes. It contains articles and news items on the following topics: California Department of Health Services questions accuracy of waste data; NRC authority over land transfers; Southeast Commission funding of North Carolina project; study of federal siting criteria; court rulings and calendar; wetland classifications; DOE tritium purchase options; control over licensed devices; revised EPA risk assessment model; EPA environmental justice guidance; possible effects of EPA guidance on LLRW disposal; elements of an adequate LLRW program; NRC Information Notice on on-site land burials; and a decommissioning schedule petition.
Date: September 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FMDP reactor alternative summary report: Volume 4, Evolutionary LWR alternative

Description: Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] have become surplus to national defense needs both in the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. The purpose of this report is to provide schedule, cost, and technical information that will be used to support the Record of Process (ROD). Following the screening process, DOE/MD via its national laboratories initiated a more detailed analysis activity to further evaluate each of the ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived the screening process. Three ``Alternative Teams,`` chartered by DOE and comprised of technical experts from across the DOE national laboratory complex, conducted these analyses. One team was chartered for each of the major disposition classes (borehole, immobilization, and reactors). During the last year and a half, the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) Reactor Alternative Team (RxAT) has conducted extensive analyses of the cost, schedule, technical maturity, S&S, and other characteristics of reactor-based plutonium disposition. The results of the RxAT`s analyses of the existing LWR, CANDU, and partially complete LWR alternatives are documented in Volumes 1-3 of this report. This document (Volume 4) summarizes the results of these analyses for the ELWR-based plutonium disposition option.
Date: September 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Makeup water treatment and auxiliary boiler building structural design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant

Description: The Makeup Water Treatment and Auxiliary Boiler Building (MWABB) is a grade-founded, single-story, steel-framed structure with insulated sheet metal exterior walls and roof decking. It houses the electrically-heated auxiliary boiler and related equipment, and the Raw Water Treatment System. The Makeup Water Treatment and Auxiliary Boiler building is located adjacent to the Maintenance Building in the Energy Conversion Area of the plant.
Date: June 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Liquid radioactive waste subsystem design description

Description: The Liquid Radioactive Waste Subsystem provides a reliable system to safely control liquid waste radiation and to collect, process, and dispose of all radioactive liquid waste without impairing plant operation. Liquid waste is stored in radwaste receiver tanks and is processed through demineralizers and temporarily stored in test tanks prior to sampling and discharge. Radwastes unsuitable for discharge are transferred to the Solid Radwaste System.
Date: June 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Guide to good practices for operations organization and administration

Description: This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Organization and Administration, Chapter I of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations organization and administration programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. This standard should be used in conjunction with principles of the Integrated Safety Management System as incorporated in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. Operations Organization and Administration is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for well-defined standards and requirements for safe and efficient operations.
Date: December 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comment and response document for the long-term surveillance plan for the Gunnison disposal site, Gunnison, Colorado

Description: This report contains site inspection concerns and recommendations relating to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to clean up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination at an abandoned uranium mill site in Gunnison, Colorado. Plans for implementation of these recommendations are also included.
Date: December 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Class 1E dc power subsystem design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant

Description: The Class 1E DC Power System of the Electrical Group provides reliable and regulated 125 V dc electric power to the plant safety-related dc loads connected to the Four redundant and independent 125 V dc Class 1E buses to ensure plant safe shutdown or mitigate the effects of a design basis event. These four dc buses comprise the plant four Class 1E dc control and instrument channels (A, B, C and D).
Date: June 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MHTGR-Nuclear Island Engineering: Final summary report for the period November 30, 1987 through December 1, 1988

Description: This report summarizes the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) - Nuclear Island Engineering (NIE) design and development work performed by General Atomics (GA) for the period November 30, 1987 through December 1, 1988, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract AC03-88SF17367. The scope of the report includes work performed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI), Combustion Engineering Inc. (C-E), and James Howden Company, as major subcontractors to GA.
Date: December 1, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure relief subsystem design description

Description: The primary function of the Pressure Relief Subsystem, a subsystem of the Vessel System, is to provide overpressure protection to the Vessel System. When the overpressure setpoint is reached, pressure is reduced by permitting the flow of primary coolant out of the Vessel System. This subsystem also provides the flow path by which purified helium is returned to the vessel system, either as circulating purge/flow from the Helium Purification Subsystem or make-up helium from the Helium Storage and Transfer Subsystem.
Date: July 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of the contractor information exchange meeting for improving the safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants, February 19, 1997

Description: This report summarizes a meeting held on February 19, 1997, in Washington, D.C. The meeting was held primarily to exchange information among the contractors involved in the U.S. Department of Energy`s efforts to improve the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Previous meetings have been held on December 5-6, 1995, and May 22, 1996. The meetings are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy works with countries to increase the level of safety at 63 Soviet-designed nuclear reactors operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. The work is implemented largely by commercial companies and individuals who provide technologies and services to the countries with Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Attending the meeting were 71 representatives of commercial contractors, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, national laboratories, and other federal agencies. The presentations and discussions that occurred during the exchange are summarized in this report. While this report captures the general presentation and discussion points covered at the meeting, it is not a verbatim, inclusive record. To make the report useful, information presented at the meeting has been expanded to clarify issues, respond to attendees` requests, or place discussion points in a broader programmatic context. Appendixes A through F contain the meeting agenda, list of attendees, copies of presentation visuals and handouts, the Strategy Document discussed at the meeting, and a summary of attendees` post-meeting evaluation comments. As with past information exchanges, the participants found this meeting valuable and useful. In response to the participant`s requests, a fourth information exchange will be held later in 1997.
Date: April 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the 2. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology. Final report

Description: The goal of the conference was to try to attract a variety of points of view from well-informed people to debate issues concerning nuclear power. Hopefully from that process a better understanding of what one should be doing will emerge. In organizing the conference lessons learned from the previous one were applied. A continuous effort was made to see to it that the arguments for the alternatives to nuclear power were given abundant time for presentation. This is ultimately because nuclear power is going to have to compete with all of the energy technologies. Thus, in discussing energy strategy all of the alternatives must be considered in a reasonable fashion. The structure the conference used has seven sessions. The first six led up to the final session which was concerned with what the future nuclear power strategy should be. Each session focused upon a question concerning the future. None of these questions has a unique correct answer. Rather, topics are addressed where reasonable people can disagree. In order to state some of the important arguments for each session`s question, the combination of a keynote paper followed by a respondent was used. The respondent`s paper is not necessarily included to be a rebuttal to the keynote; but rather, it was recognized that two people will look at a complex question with different shadings. Through those two papers the intention was to get out the most important arguments affecting the question for the session. The purpose of the papers was to set the stage for about an hour of discussion. The real product of this conference was that discussion.
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New vision solar system exploration missions study: Analysis of the use of biomodal space nuclear power systems to support outer solar system exploration missions. Final report

Description: This report presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter mission s to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of a NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. Concepts for microspacecraft capable of probing Jupiter`s atmosphere and exploring Titan were also developed. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive option for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination.
Date: December 8, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Guide to good practices for notifications and investigation of abnormal events

Description: This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Notifications, Chapter VII, and Investigation of Abnormal Events, Chapter VI, of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing programs for notifications and investigation of abnormal events. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Notifications and Investigation of Abnormal Events are elements of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a coordinated notifications program and a consistent method for investigating abnormal events to promote safe and efficient operations.
Date: December 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Final technical report, January 11, 1991--April 30, 1998

Description: As noted in the historical summary, this program encountered a number of changes in direction, schedule, and scope over the period 11 January 1991 to 31 December 1998. The report provides a comprehensive summary of all the varied aspects of the program over its seven and a quarter years, and highlights those aspects that provide information beneficial to future radioisotope programs. In addition to summarizing the scope of the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program provided as background, the introduction includes a discussion of the scope of the final report and offers reference sources for information on those topics not covered. Much of the design heritage of the GPHS-RTG comes from the Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) RTGs used on the Lincoln Experimental Satellites (LES) 8/9 and Voyager spacecraft. The design utilized for the Cassini program was developed, in large part, under the GPHS-RTG program which produced the Galileo and Ulysses RTGs. Reports from those programs included detailed documentation of the design, development, and testing of converter components and full converters that were identical to, or similar to, components used in the Cassini program. Where such information is available in previous reports, it is not repeated here.
Date: August 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design data needs modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Revision 2

Description: The Design Data Needs (DDNs) provide summary statements for program management, of the designer`s need for experimental data to confirm or validate assumptions made in the design. These assumptions were developed using the Integrated Approach and are tabulated in the Functional Analysis Report. These assumptions were also necessary in the analyses or trade studies (A/TS) to develop selections of hardware design or design requirements. Each DDN includes statements providing traceability to the function and the associated assumption that requires the need.
Date: March 1, 1987
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Helium Storage and Transfer Subsystem design description. Revision

Description: The Helium Storage and Transfer Subsystem (HSTS) consists of two parts. The first consists of nine (9) high pressure storage tanks containing helium at 15.6 MPa (2250 psig). These tanks provide makeup and purge helium at a rate of 1216 kg per y (2680 lb/y) to the various helium users, including circulator bearing seals, analysis packages, and cooling system surge tanks. The second, larger part of the system, provides for the low pressure storage of 6078 kg (13,400 lb) of primary coolant helium in 180 storage tanks at 7.0 MPa (1000 psig). The system serves all four (4) reactor modules. The low pressure storage part of the system receives helium from the discharge of Helium Purification Subsystem (HPS) and is activated during depressurization and pumpup operations only. It is not required to operate continuously. Storage capacity is provided for primary helium coolant from two reactor modules. However, since depressurization and pumpup operations are performed for only one reactor module at a time, two 50% capacity low pressure transfer compressors are provided having a total transfer capacity of 340 am{sup 3}/h (200 acfm) which is sufficient to service one module. High pressure helium is supplied continuously to all the four reactor modules simultaneously from the high pressure storage tanks. These tanks are replaced periodically with fresh tanks.
Date: July 1, 1987
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Security monitoring subsystem design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant

Description: Security Monitoring acquires and processes sensor data for use by security personnel in the performance of their function. Security Monitoring is designed and implemented as a part of an overall security plan which is classified as Safeguards Information under 10CFR73.21.
Date: June 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1996 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

Description: The 1996 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The primary mission of the Bettis Laboratory has been directed toward the design, development, testing, and operation of nuclear reactor propulsion plants for naval surface and submarine vessels. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 1996 were in accordance with applicable federal, state, county, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicated that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrated that these residues do not pose any significant health risk.
Date: 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department