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Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1 - March 31, 1996

Description: The objective is to determine methods for detection and mapping of naturally fractured systems for economic production of natural gas from fractured reservoirs. This report contains: 3D P-wave alternate processing; down hole 3C geophone analysis; fracture pattern analysis of the Fort Union and Wind River Basin; 3D-3C seismic processing; and technology transfer.
Date: 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High volume-high value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

Description: The target for the project has been shifted from filling, highwall mine adits to filling auger holes with FGD material to provide a stable highwall for automated highwall mining. As reported previously, this shift in emphasis is economically desirable and practical, as the filling operation is safer and permits access to ``locked in`` high quality coal behind existing auger holes. As also reported previously, the fill material was shifted from dry FGD materials to a Fluidized Bed Combustion fly ash from the Archer Daniel Midland No. 6 facility in Illinois. Previous reports have summarized the characterization of this material for the project. However, due mostly to economic concerns with prehydration and transport of the Archer Daniel Midland (ADM6) material, several new desulfurization by-products stored at the Costain facility in Allen, Kentucky were considered during, this quarter. At this stage of the project, the change in fill material required rapid assessment in much the same way an applied working project would demand quick evaluation. This change thus provided an opportunity to demonstrate a rapid assessment of material suitability. The results described below were obtained in a short time frame, and with the exception of characterizing the long term swell and durability of the products, the rapid assessment was a success. No rapid assessment methodology for long term behavior has been developed at this time. The mineralogical characteristics of the two Costain materials will not be summarized in detail here. Unlike the ADM6 ash, the spray dryer and FBC materials currently under review do not include the large percentages of free lime (CaO) that was shown to cause high mixing temperatures in the nonprehydrated ADM6 product. This absence of free lime in the raw by-products is immediately evident when mixing with water, as no significant heating of the mixture is observed.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

Description: Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13--December 12, 1996

Description: Eighteen 10-acre infill wells have been drilled and completed as part of the Field Demonstration phase of the project at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit (NRU). The fourteen producing wells are pumped-off and producing at stable rates. The four injection wells are completed and have been on injection for three to four weeks. Current Unit production is approximately 3,400 STBO/D, of which approximately 900 STBO/D is being produced from the 10-acre infill wells. A change in the Statement of Work has been approved so that additional 10-acre infill wells can be drilled and/or 20-acre producing wells can be converted to injection during the next quarter as budget constraints and rig availability allow. Technical progress is described for the quarter in many related areas: implementation of the field demonstration; reservoir characterization; reservoir management activities and performance analysis; reservoir simulation; and technology transfer.
Date: December 12, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Disposal of fluidized-bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence

Description: During Phase I (first 18 months) the project is segregated into four areas of reporting: (A) Grout Formulation, (B) Grout Characterization, (C) Water Quality Monitoring, (D) Subsidence Control & Contaminant Transport. The first component involves formulating a grout mixture with appropriate flowability to be used in filling complex mine voids. The Grout Characterization component will determine the flow characteristics of the formulated grout. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase III (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the strength requirements and the migration of contaminants through the candidate grouts. This report separately discusses progress on all components of the program in order of project subtask.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, June 1--August 31, 1996

Description: Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ``as-generated`` slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ``as-generated`` slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 17000F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot-scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. Accomplishments are described.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The programs focus on hot-gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match or nearly match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. The goal of this project is to continue further development of the zinc titanate desulfurization and direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP) technologies by (1) scaling up the zinc titanate reactor system; (2) developing an integrated skid-mounted zinc titanate desulfurization-DSRP reactor system; (3) testing the integrated system over an extended period with real coal-as from an operating gasifier to quantify the degradative effect, if any, of the trace contaminants present in cola gas; (4) developing an engineering database suitable for system scaleup; and (5) designing, fabricating and commissioning a larger DSRP reactor system capable of operating on a six-fold greater volume of gas than the DSRP reactor used in the bench-scale field test. The work performed during the April 1 through June 30, 1996 period is described.
Date: December 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An advanced control system for fine coal flotation. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1995--June 30, 1996

Description: A model-based flotation control scheme is being implemented to achieve optimal performance in the handling and treatment of fine coal. The control scheme monitors flotation performance through on-line analysis of ash content. Then, based on the economic and metallurgical performance of the circuit, variables such as reagent dosage, air addition rate, pulp density and pulp level are adjusted using model-based control algorithms to compensate for feed variations and other process disturbances. Recent developments in video-based sensor technology are being applied for on-line determination of slurry ash content. During the third quarter of this project, work continued on the testing and calibration of the video-based ash analyzer, and a plant sampling campaign was conducted to provide data for the development of a mathematical process model and the model-based control algorithms.
Date: November 26, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation on durability and reactivity of promising metal oxide sorbents during sulfidation and regeneration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

Description: Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with promising sorbents of fine solid was carried on in a batch reactor. The objectives of this research project are to formulate promising durable metal oxide sorbents for the removal of sulfur compounds from coal gas mixtures, to find intrinsic initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of concentrations of coal gas components such as hydrogen and moisture on equilibrium absorption as well as dynamic absorption of hydrogen sulfide into formulated sorbents for the reaction system at various reaction temperatures and pressures, and to obtain effects of concentrations of coal gas components such as hydrogen and moisture on reaction rates of hydrogen sulfide with formulated sorbents at various reaction temperatures and pressures.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-2, California

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) in Kern County, California. The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study. Additional details are provided in the Addendum (the Phase I Property Description and Fact Finding Report). The key property elements that positively affect the estimated value of NPR-2 include the following: royalty income from producing oil and gas leases, rental income from non-producing oil and gas leases, income from grazing or leasing of grazing rights, potential income from oil and gas leasing on exploratory (or nonprospective) acreage, potential value of trading surface real estate as ranch land for sheep grazing (10,044 acres), and town lots for residential or commercial development (16.7 acres). Key elements that negatively impact the estimated value include: environmental assessment costs, operating budgets, and lease sale expenses.
Date: December 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1996

Description: Good progress was made on both the experimental and process modelling fronts during the past quarter. All experimental tests used the fixed-bed laboratory reactor to study the sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and the regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S using SO{sub 2}. A number of experimental problems were solved (or at least alleviated) during the quarter including malfunctioning mass flow controllers, excessive bed pressure drop, and elimination of the H{sub 2}S plateau during early stages of sulfidation tests. Most CeO{sub 2} sulfidation tests were carried out a 800{degrees}C and 5 atm using a sulfidation gas containing 1% H{sub 2}S, 10 % H{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2}. At these conditions sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} was rapid and complete. Sulfur material balance closure was satisfactory, and, except for the unexpected H{sub 2}S plateau during the prebreakthrough period, the sulfidation results were as expected. Near the end of the quarter, the cause of the H{sub 2}S plateau was tentatively identified as being due to reaction between H{sub 2} and elemental sulfur deposited downstream of the sorbent in the bottom of the reactor and in tubing leading to the gas chromatograph. The sulfur deposits occurred during regeneration tests, and chemically cleaning the lines between regeneration and sulfidation coupled with reducing the temperature of the transfer line during sulfidation greatly reduced the H{sub 2}S plateau. A brief examination of the effect of sulfidation temperature between 700 and 850{degrees}C showed relatively little temperature effect, although the slope of the active portion of the breakthrough curve was somewhat smaller at 700{degrees}C, which is consistent with a smaller reaction rate at this temperature.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, November 1, 1996--January 31, 1997

Description: The Base Research Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) is planned to develop technologies to a level that will attract industrial sponsors for continued development under the Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program. The goals of the Base Research Program are in support of those of the JSR Program, which are designed to: increase the production of US and western energy resources, particularly low-sulfur coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; enhance the competitiveness of US and western energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; reduce the nation`s dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the US and regional economies; and minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Summaries are presented for 11 subtasks related to these four main goals.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced coal liquefaction. Final quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

Description: Molecular level liquid phase separations were explored using modified microporous ceramic membrane with pore size reduced from 40{Angstrom} via chemical vapor deposition. At room temperature, membranes with pore sizes <30{Angstrom} were sufficient to achieve >97% rejection of Naphthyl-bibenzyl-methane (NBBM) from toluene, which was primarily attributed to size exclusion due to hindered diffusion. The rejection diminishes dramatically as the temperature is increased. At 400{degrees}C, very small pore sizes are required to separate NBBM from tetralin. In addition to size based separation, active transport at the surface of the membrane was observed at appropriate pore sizes. Also, it was found that the rejection increases along with the transmembrane pressure, probably attributed to the pore size distribution of the membrane. The smaller pore sizes become accessible to the solvent at the higher pressure. Decomposition of NBBM took place at 400{degrees}C in a modified membrane packed with the catalyst synthesized using the similar protocol as membranes. The separation property of this membrane at 400{degrees}C was analyzed indirectly based upon the reaction product distribution.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report No. 6, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

Description: The main goal of this program is to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. This quarterly report covers activities during the period from April 1, 1996 through June 30, 1996. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort has continued on a no-cost extension of the original contract. Samples have been supplied to CPC participants so they could conduct their portions of the project as contracted through ORNL. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: project planning and administration; consortium administration and reporting; coal extraction; technical/economic evaluation of WVU extraction process; and technology transfer. Previous work has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for producing suitable base raw materials for carbon products. Current effort, therefore, involved the screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. As part of this program, the activation of the coal extraction residues was investigated for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon. A further task, which was started towards the end of the program, was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of these studies are summarized in this report.
Date: July 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual report for calendar year 1998

Description: The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was established in 1975 as an emergency response to the 1973 Arab oil embargo. It is authorized by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), and by the comprehensive energy plans of all Administrations since 1975, in recognition of the long-term dependence of the US on imported crude oil and petroleum products. Section 165 of EPCA requires the Secretary of Energy to submit an Annual Report to the President and the Congress. On May 13, 1998, the Department published a Statement of Administration Policy which reaffirmed its commitment to maintain a Government-owned and controlled, centrally located Strategic Petroleum Reserve of crude oil. The Reserve is to be used solely for responding to the types of severe oil supply interruptions presently contemplated in EPCA. Over the past twenty years, the Reserve has grown as large as 592 million barrels--a peak reached in 1994. From 1994 to 1996, nearly 28 million barrels were sold to raise revenues for the U S Treasury. As of December 31, 1998, the crude oil inventory was 561,108,127 barrels which equated to 60 days of net oil imports during 1998. The US now relies on a combination of both the Reserve and private stocks to meet its oil storage obligations to the International Energy Agency.
Date: December 31, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1995

Description: In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data; (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control; and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Tasks accomplished during the present reporting period include: (1) observation of the FBG during the week of July 17 to July 21; (2) suggested improvements to the control of FBG backpressure and MGCR pressure; and (3) data collection from FBG run No. 11 and transfer of data to USC.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, September 1--November 30, 1997

Description: In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. This document summarizes the Phase 2 accomplishments to date along with the major accomplishments from Phase 1.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells

Description: Based on the information presented in this report, our conclusions regarding the potential for new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells are as follows: New and improved gas storage well revitalization methods have the potential to save industry on the order of $20-25 million per year by mitigating deliverability decline and reducing the need for costly infill wells Fracturing technologies have the potential to fill this role, however operators have historically been reluctant to utilize this approach due to concerns with reservoir seal integrity. With advanced treatment design tools and methods, however, this risk can be minimized. Of the three major fracturing classifications, namely hydraulic, pulse and explosive, two are believed to hold potential to gas storage applications (hydraulic and pulse). Five particular fracturing technologies, namely tip-screenout fracturing, fracturing with liquid carbon dioxide, and fracturing with gaseous nitrogen, which are each hydraulic methods, and propellant and nitrogen pulse fracturing, which are both pulse methods, are believed to hold potential for gas storage applications and will possibly be tested as part of this project. Field evidence suggests that, while traditional well remediation methods such as blowing/washing, mechanical cleaning, etc. do improve well deliverability, wells are still left damaged afterwards, suggesting that considerable room for further deliverability enhancement exists. Limited recent trials of hydraulic fracturing imply that this approach does in fact provide superior deliverability results, but further RD&D work is needed to fully evaluate and demonstrate the benefits and safe application of this as well as other fracture stimulation technologies.
Date: April 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heavy oil upgrading. Semi annual report {number_sign}2, April 1--September 30, 1996

Description: For the period April 1 to September 30, 1996, research efforts were focused on the synthesis and characterization of large quantities of Metal Substituted Aluminophosphate Molecular Sieves Catalysts of type 36 structure (MeAPO-36) for use in the upgrading of petroleum residuum. So far the authors have succeeded in synthesizing catalysts samples containing magnesium, zinc, cobalt and manganese in the frameworks of the respective molecular sieve. Preliminary characterization studies done by Infrared Spectroscopy demonstrated that these materials contains the Bronsted acid sites that they proposed will be active centers in the Mild Hydrocracking Process. Recently, a range of interesting aluminosilicates mesoporous materials was synthesized by Mobil R and D. These materials, known as MCM-41 type materials, contain ultra large pore unidimensional channels ranging from 20 angstrom to 100 angstrom and therefore have tremendous potential for Resid upgrading since their acid strengths are milder than zeolite. To broaden the scope of the project, MCM 41 was synthesized in the laboratory according to published procedures and the structure was confirmed by XRD. In addition, an ultra large pore high silica zeolite, UTD-1, containing a 14 angstrom tetrahedral atom pore opening was recently synthesized by Researchers at Texas A and M University. Like MCM-41, this material also has tremendous potential for Resid Upgrading since the pores are capable of accommodating larger organic molecules. The authors are currently characterizing samples of this zeolite that they intend to use in conjunction with the MeAPOs to form composite catalysts for use in resid upgrading.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Precombustion removal of hazardous air pollutant precursors. Technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

Description: This project involves the development of an optimized, bench-scale processing circuit capable of efficiently removing trace elements from run-of-mine coals. The optimized circuit will be developed using characterization data obtained from detailed washability studies and release analyses tests conducted with several eastern U.S. coals. The optimized circuit will incorporate a variety of conventional and advanced coal cleaning processes. The coal products from the optimized circuit will be further treated with complexing agents specifically designed to extract organometallic trace elements that are difficult to remove by physical cleaning operations. Finally, innovative bioremediation schemes will be investigated as a means of controlling the release of trace elements from the process waste streams. Emphasis has been placed on the development of a processing circuit which (i) maximizes the rejection of trace elements, (ii) minimizes the production of coal fines which are costly to process and less marketable, and (iii) minimizes the downstream impacts of the process waste on the environment. During the past quarter, several key subtasks were completed. Most of the characterization tests for the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal have now been concluded. These include all activities associated with Subtasks 3.2 washability analysis, 3.3 flotation release analysis, and 3.4 SEM/image analysis. A large portion of the bench-scale test work was also completed during the past quarter for the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal under Subtask 4.1 heavy media testing. Additional bench-scale tests are underway as outlined in Subtask 4.2 froth flotation and 4.3 enhanced gravity separation. Finally, experiments conducted under Subtasks 6.1 analysis of pond toxics and 6.2 control method evaluation using samples of refuse from the Pittsburgh No. 8 seam indicate that significant reductions (up to 90%) in trace element content can be achieved through the application of microbial mats.
Date: September 19, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, March 25--June 24, 1996

Description: The experimental study was continued on methane oxidative coupling using an oxygen-permeable dense membrane reactor. The oxygen permeance through the dense membrane was measured and preliminary experiments were conducted with the catalytic membrane reactor. The oxygen permeance was found to be similar to that obtained earlier without catalyst packing. No C{sub 2} hydrocarbons were observed in the catalytic membrane reactor for methane coupling. In order to reduce the non-selective, total oxidation activity of the dense membrane material, the inner surface of the dense membrane tube was deposited by the sol-gel technique with BaCe{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4}O{sub 3}, which is a catalytic, oxygen-conductive material without total oxidation catalytic activity. The dense membrane tube was examined by XRD before and after the deposition. Catalytic experiments with the coated dense membrane reactor were carried out and higher C{sub 2} selectivity was observed than with the co-feed reactor.
Date: August 28, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1995

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The programs focus on hot-gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match or nearly match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. The goal of this project is to continue further development of the zinc titanate desulfurization and direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP) technologies by (1) scaling up the zinc titanate reactor system; (2) developing an integrated skid-mounted zinc titanate desulfurization-DSRP reactor system; (3) testing the integrated system over an extended period with real coal-gas from an operating gasifier to quantify the degradative effect, if any, of the trace contaminants present in coal gas; (4) developing an engineering database suitable for system scaleup; and (5) designing, fabricating and commissioning a larger DSRP reactor system capable of operating on a six-fold greater volume of gas than the DSRP reactor used in the bench-scale field test. The work performed during the October 1 through December 31, 1995 is described.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

Description: Accomplishments during this quarter are described on the study being done in the Wind River basin. Accomplishments include 3-D P-wave alternate processing, interpretation this alternate processing, P-P and P-S processing, correlation matrix, modeling, and Wind River basin geology, including a geologic history of the Wind River basin, located in the center of the Rocky Mountain foreland.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, February 1--April 30, 1996

Description: The Base Research Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) is planned to develop technologies to a level that will attract industrial sponsors for continued development under the Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program. The goals of the Base Research Program are in support of those of the JSR Program, which are designed to: increase the production of US and western energy resources, particularly low-sulfur coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; enhance the competitiveness of US and western energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; reduce the nation`s dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the US and regional economies; and minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Summaries are presented for many of the subtasks related to oil and gas research, advanced systems applications for coal, environmental technologies, and remediation. The paper also contains federal assistance management summary reports, and contract status reports.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department