39 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Laying Out Fields for Tractor Plowing

Description: "Tractor plowing usually requires methods of laying out the land different from those followed when plowing with horses and an ordinary plow. Farmers plowing with a tractor for the first time are often at a loss for the most satisfactory methods of laying out their fields.... This bulletin embodies the descriptions of methods found best suited to their conditions and recommended by a majority of several hundred tractor owners who have reported their methods and experiences. Among these will be found methods of laying out land suited to nearly every farm in this country and to fields of different shapes." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Tolley, H. R. (Howard Ross), 1889-1958
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sheep on Irrigated Farms in the Northwest

Description: "The present outlook for the sheep business appears to warrant the maintenance of many more farm flocks than are now being kept in these districts, and this bulletin is designed to further the expansion of the industry by pointing out its possibilities and by giving examples of good farm practice with sheep. The methods of handling and feeding sheep as practiced on 12 representative irrigated farms, large and small, and in various parts of the Northwest, are described in some detail. A few of these farms specialize in sheep, but on most of them the sheep enterprise is combined with some other major enterprise, such as dairying, hog raising, growing sugar beets, or orcharding. One of the more serious problems that the farmer must face in introducing sheep on an irrigated farm is that of pasture; hence special attention has been given to outlining methods to be followed in establishing pasture grasses and pasture supplements." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Jayne, S. O. (Stephen Oscar), b. 1878
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Simple Way to Increase Crop Yields: Methods Followed by Farmers of the Coastal Plain Section of the Central Atlantic States in Building Up Soil Fertility

Description: "The soils of the coastal plain section of the Central Atlantic States, as a rule, are light in character, have been farmed for generations, and need first of all a liberal supply of organic matter. This need should be met by growing such legumes as crimson clover, cowpeas, soy beans, red clover, and hairy vetch. Rye, buckwheat, and the grasses are also valuable in this connection. Commercial fertilizer and lime should be used freely when necessary to stimulate the growth of these soil-improving crops. By arranging the cropping system to include one or more legumes that supply the land with nitrogen and humus, crop yields have been greatly increased on many farms scattered throughout this region. The systems followed on a few of the more successful of these farms are described in detail in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Miller, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Place of Sheep on New England Farms

Description: "Conditions created by the European war have made sheep raising on a small scale a very profitable enterprise for the New England farmer so situated as to take advantage of the economic conditions. Prior to the recent remarkable advance in prices of wool and mutton, sheep raising in New England was comparatively unprofitable, but now, under certain conditions, a revival of the industry seems desirable. This bulletin tells briefly how the industry was organized in 1914, and discusses the difficulties to be met in expanding the business, with special reference to improvement in breeding stock, better care, and more efficient disease control." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Branch, F. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Haymaking

Description: "Haymaking is an operation that must be done in a certain space of time that is short at best and that is always liable to be made shorter by bad weather. For this reason there is perhaps no farm operation in which system and efficiency count for more than in haymaking; yet throughout the hay-growing area more or less haphazard methods of haymaking are still very common. This bulletin is designed to point out ways in which the more successful hay growers of the country save time and labor in this important field work. It tells how the growing scarcity of farm labor may be met by rearranging crews and changing methods, and by the adoption of up-to-date implements, such as the hay loader, push rake, and stacker. In addition to outlines of methods for various sized crews and acreages the bulletin presents, briefly, a discussion of the theory of curing hay, a thorough understanding of which is a great help in planning an efficient method of haymaking." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: McClure, H. B. (Harry B.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hay Caps

Description: "Hay caps can be used to advantage to keep rain from wetting hay in cocks on many farms in the eastern half of the United States." -- p. 2. This bulletin describes the different types of hay camps, estimates their cost, and explains how hay caps may be used.
Date: 1918
Creator: McClure, H. B. (Harry B.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Handling Barnyard Manure in Eastern Pennsylvania

Description: "Barnyard manure is handled with special care and excellent results by farmers in certain parts of Eastern Pennsylvania. For over a century it has been the custom in this region to store stable manure in a walled manure yard, partly or wholly covered, in which the stabled animals are allowed to exercise during the day. Manure thrown into such a yard and thoroughly tramped by stock loses much less through heating and leaching than does manure piled in the open. This bulletin describes the manure-yard method of handling manure and outlines the farm practices of ten successful farmers who follow this method." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Brodie, D. A. (David Arthur), b. 1868
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields in Kentucky and Tennessee

Description: "In the limestone and mountain districts south of the Ohio River there is much land that has been run down by continual cropping without rotation. In some places run-down land is left to grow up in weeds, wild grasses, and brush, a practice known as 'resting' the land. Where this sort of farm management is followed farm manure is largely wasted, little or no attention is paid to green-manure crops or other means of putting humus into the soil, and crop yields are very low. However, progressive farmers throughout the region who have built up run-down lands are now getting heavy yields. In the following pages are described some of the methods by which these farmers get results by making good use of farm manure and crop refuse, using legumes and grasses in regular rotations, and applying lime and commercial fertilizers." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields: The Gulf Coast Region

Description: "Gulf Coast region upland soils are ordinarily deficient in nitrogen and need to be supplied with liberal quantities of organic matter if profitable crop yields are to be produced. This condition is most easily and cheaply remedied by growing such legumes as velvet beans, cowpeas, soy beans, bur clover, crimson clover, hairy vetch, and beggar weed, and by carefully utilizing all farm manures, crop residues, and other sources of humus. By a simple readjustment most of the cropping systems followed in this region may be made to include one or more legumes which will increase the supply of nitrogen and humus in the soil and greatly increase crop yields. Systems by means of which crop yields are being increased in the region are discussed in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Crosby, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Crop Systems for Arkansas

Description: "Crop systems for Arkansas that make for increased food production and increased efficiency in man labor and horse labor are described in the following pages. By the introduction of cowpeas, soybeans, and other legumes, and by second cropping, provision is made for a considerable increase in the number of crop acres that can be farmed by the average family.... In each of the cropping systems suggested the crop acreages are calculated for two men and a team, and for light, medium, and heavy soils. These systems in general apply to all of Arkansas, except the northwestern part, and some of them may be used to advantage in northern Louisiana, northeastern Texas, southeastern Oklahoma, western Tennessee, and the northern half of Mississippi." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: McNair, A. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ways of Making Southern Mountain Farms More Productive

Description: "The southern mountain farm often produces no more than a scant living for the family. Corn is the chief crop grown. Often part of the farm lies idle, being 'rested' while corn is grown on another part year after year until the land is worn out. By growing three or more crops in rotation, including clover, the farmer will be able to produce larger crops, make more money, and keep all crop land under cultivation all the time. Cattle, hogs, and sheep will not only add to the cash income, but will help to increase the fertility of the soil, and render larger crops possible. This bulletin describes crop rotations for small mountain farms in the southern Alleghenies, and gives complete directions for starting a crop rotation that will make poor mountain land more productive." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Farm Tractor in the Dakotas

Description: This bulletin explains how gas-driven tractors can increase the productivity of farms in North and South Dakota and uses data in order to convince farmers that a farm tractor is a worthwhile investment. It also discusses issues with tractors such as maintenance and repairs and operating costs.
Date: unknown
Creator: Yerkes, Arnold P. & Church, L. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Saving Man Labor in Sugar Beet Fields

Description: "By using bigger implements and more horses per man, many sugar-beet growers have greatly reduced their expenses for man labor and often at the same time have been able to cover more ground per day than before. This bulletin tells how the more successful farmers of the several American sugar-beet regions are speeding up production and saving man power by thus increasing their efficiency in the utilization of larger teams and improved mechanical power." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Moorhouse, L. A. & Summers, T. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dry Farming for Better Wheat Yields: The Columbia and Snake River Basins

Description: "This bulletin deals in particular with the dry farming methods practiced on grain farms in the Pacific Northwest where the rainfall is less than 18 to 20 inches annually, but it also contains advice helpful to all farmers of that region who practice summer-fallowing. Its purpose is to show the possibility of increasing crop yields in the dry-farming areas by using improved methods, and to discuss the practices which have been found most advantageous.... The purposes of summer-fallowing and details of the methods of their accomplishment are presented, with the application of these methods to the cultivation of "blow" soils and "nonblow" soils, and methods are suggested for preventing and stopping the blowing of soils. Attention is given to the seeding of winter and of spring wheat, and suggestions are made for properly maintaining the organic matter in the soil." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Hunter, Byron, b. 1869
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Baling Hay

Description: "This bulletin aims to help the hay grower solve some of the problems that arise in connection with baling hay; to decide whether to buy a press or depend on custom balers, to select the type of press best suited to his needs if hey buys, and to settle to best advantage questions in farm practice that determine efficiency in the settling and operation of a hay press." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: McClure, H. B. (Harry B.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Home Supplies Furnished by the Farm

Description: "It is the purpose of this bulletin to point out the importance of the food, fuel, and shelter furnished the family by the farm. These contributions are not a cash receipt from the farm business, but they enable the farmer to reduce materially the cash cost of living and to continue business even when the financial summary of his operations may show only a small margin of profit at the end of the year.... In the following pages are presented graphic illustrations of a few of the more important methods followed by farmers in utilizing the food, fuel, shelter, and other things that the farm furnishes free of money cost." -- p. 3.
Date: 1920
Creator: Funk, W. C. (Warren Clemmer), 1885-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Selecting a Farm

Description: "The wise selection of a farm is vital to the success and satisfaction of farm life. Choosing a farm often means choosing a place in which to live and work for a lifetime.... It is the purpose of this bulletin to bring some of these points to the reader's attention." -- p. 3. Topics discussed include financial resources, economic conditions, location, soil quality, farm organization, water supply, and equipment.
Date: 1920
Creator: Thomson, E. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Factors That Make for Success in Farming in the South

Description: "This bulletin is designed to present, by pictures, charts, and brief text, some of the more important and fundamental factors that make for success on the Southern farm." -- p. 2 Factors discussed include record keeping, crop yields, the use of legumes as fertilizers, efficiency of labor, waste lands, and farm organization.
Date: 1920
Creator: Goodrich, C. L. (Charles Landon)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waste Land and Wasted Land on Farms

Description: This report discusses the efficiency and production of farms with respect to productive and nonproductive lands. It provides guidelines for identifying nonproductive lands and gives suggestions for maximizing the production of lands which were thought to be nonproductive.
Date: 1916
Creator: Ball, James S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Farmer's Income

Description: This bulletin reports statistics about the average salary and wages for farmers in the United States in the early twentieth century. Also compares farmers' earnings to other workers'.
Date: 1916
Creator: Goldenweiser, E. A. (Emanuel Alexandrovich), 1883-1953
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How Live Stock Is Handled in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky

Description: "The object of this bulletin is to show how livestock is handled and fits into the farm organization in the bluegrass region of Kentucky. The average successful farm of any long-established type will have various kinds of livestock distributed in about the proportion that owners or operators in general believe will pay best. Thus, a gradual process of selection is going on constantly in all agricultural regions, and it should be to the farmer's interest to know the best practice in his community and to have explained the economic advantages that have been secured by such practice. In this bulletin an effort has been made to bring out the fundamental practices that make for success with livestock in central Kentucky as determined by the practices of the more successful livestock farmers of that region." -- p. 3
Date: 1917
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Minor Articles of Farm Equipment

Description: "Few farmers realize the extent of their investment in small items of equipment or the time and inconvenience involved in buying them singly or in small lots. In planning the farm equipment due consideration should be given to the necessary outlay for these minor tools. If possible they should be purchased all on one order. This will save time and, usually, money. Also, it will entail a total expenditure sufficiently large to impress the farmer with the importance of giving systematic care to his small tools. It is shown in this bulletin that for a general farm of 160 acres in the Middle Western States, the necessary minor tools, ranging from a husking peg to a grindstone, will cost from $100 up to the neighborhood of $200." -- p. 2. The bulletin is primarily a list of tools, recommended quantities, and average prices.
Date: 1917
Creator: Humphrey, H. N. & Yerkes, A. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department