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"Arise Americans" : your country and your liberty are in grave danger -- protect them now by joining the-- United States Navy or the U.S. Naval Reserve.

Description: A sailor in a white uniform uses a wrench on a large weapon or equipment. A blue border with white stars surrounds the top and sides of the picture. The bottom half of the poster is red, with white and blue text.
Date: June 18, 1941
Creator: Barclay, McClelland.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fight, let's go! : join the Navy.

Description: A sailor in a Service Dress Blue uniform carries a large white sea bag on his shoulder. He appears to be boarding a ship. Planes fly in the sky above him, some in formation. A large ship can be seen in the background.
Date: 1941
Creator: Barclay, McClelland.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct Air Blast Exposure Effects in Animals, Operation Upshot-Knothole, Project 4.2

Description: Project 4.2 was designed to study direct (primary) air blast injury, in animals, from an atomic weapon in the range of 20 to 50 psi under circumstances affording protection against missiles, thermal and ionizing radiation and to estimate the probable direct air blast hazard in man. The pressure levels at which atomic weapons direct air blast injuries occur will determine, to a large extent, the number of blast casualties likely to be encountered. It is probable that fatal overpressures are not reached until well within the range at which indirect (secondary) blast, thermal and ionizing radiation are practically certain to prove fatal. Only in special situations affording partial protection from other injuries are blast injuries likely to be of practical importance. Two animal species of widely different body weights (700 rats and 56 dogs) were exposed, together with air pressure recorders, in aluminum cylinders, covered by sandbags and dirt but open at both ends, at seven stations distributed within the intended overpressure range of 20 to 50 psi of Shot 10« About 200 rats were likewise exposed in Shot 9. Unfortunately, the destructive effect of the air blast of Shot 10 was much greater than anticipated. Many of the exposure cylinders were displaced and their contents destroyed. Only a partial recovery of the animals was possible due to the excessive radioactive contamination which greatly limited the time in the area. Most of the animals were dead upon recovery. Those living were in a state of severe shock. Autopsy findings showed remarkably few traumatic lesions and lung hemorrhages in spite of the rough treatment and high overpressure to which they were subjected. The rats recovered from Shot 9 were exposed to a recorded pressure of 18 to 2k psi. The autopsy findings showed moderate lung hemorrhage in most of the animals ...
Date: December 31, 1953
Creator: Draeger, R. H. & Lee, R. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Take the wheel : --steer a course for future success while serving your country in the United States Navy or the U.S. Naval Reserve.

Description: The upper half of the poster shows a painting of a large U.S. battleship, with additional ships seen in the background. In the lower half of the poster, to the left of the poster caption, is a small image of a naval officer looking through a porthole with binoculars and a sailor in a white uniform steering the ship.
Date: 1941
Creator: Murphey, Matt.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pershing's crusaders.

Description: In the foreground is an image of General Pershing on horseback, leading his troops. Two soldiers behind him hold flags: a U.S. flag and a red flag with a gold emblem. Hovering in the background is a hazy image of medieval crusaders on white horses, carrying heart-shaped shields with cross images on them.
Date: 1918~
Creator: United States. Army. Signal Corps.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flow and Force Equations for a Body Revolving in a Fluid

Description: A general method for finding the steady flow velocity relative to a body in plane curvilinear motion, whence the pressure is found by Bernoulli's energy principle is described. Integration of the pressure supplies basic formulas for the zonal forces and moments on the revolving body. The application of the steady flow method for calculating the velocity and pressure at all points of the flow inside and outside an ellipsoid and some of its limiting forms is presented and graphs those quantities for the latter forms.
Date: December 1979
Creator: Zahm, A. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability Equations for Airship Hulls

Description: In the text are derived simple formulae for determining, directly from the data of wind tunnel tests of a model of an airship hull, what shall be the approximate character of oscillation, in pitch or yaw, of the full-scale airship when slightly disturbed from steady forward motion. (author).
Date: 1926
Creator: Zahm, A. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of propeller test data to design and performance calculations

Description: From Summary: "This report is a study of a test data on a family of Durand's propellers (nos. 3, 7, 11, 82, 113, 139), which is fairly representative of conventional design. The test data are so plotted that the proper pitch and diameters for any given set of conditions are readily obtained. The same data are plotted in other forms which may be used for calculating performance when the ratio of pitch to diameter is known. These new plots supply a means for calculating the performance, at any altitude, of airplanes equipped with normal or supercharged engines."
Date: January 1925
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The calculation of take-off run

Description: From Summary: "A comparatively simple method of calculating length of take-off run is developed from the assumption of a linear variation in net accelerating force with air speed and it is shown that the error involved is negligible. Detailed instructions are given for application of the formula and for the calculation of all factors involved."
Date: January 1934
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engine performance and the determination of absolute ceiling

Description: From Summary: "This report contains a brief study of the variation of engine power with temperature and pressure. The variation of propeller efficiency in standard atmosphere is obtained from the general efficiency curve which is developed in NACA report no. 168. The variation of both power available and power required are then determined and curves plotted, so that the absolute ceiling may be read directly from any known sea-level value of the ratio of power available to power required."
Date: January 1924
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Charts for graphical estimation of airplane performance

Description: This report contains a series of charts which were developed in order to simplify the estimation of airplane performance. Charts are given for estimating propeller diameter and efficiency, maximum speed, initial rate of climb, absolute ceiling, service ceiling, climb in 10 minutes, time to climb to any altitude, maximum speed at any altitude, and endurance. A majority of these charts are based on the equations given in NACA Technical Report no. 173. Plots of pressure and density against altitude in standard air are also given for convenience. It must be understood that the charts giving propeller diameter, maximum speed, initial rate of climb, absolute ceiling, and speeds at altitudes are approximations subject to considerable error under certain conditions. These particular charts should not be used as a substitute for detailed calculations when accuracy is required, as, for example, in military proposals. (author).
Date: January 1925
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The general efficiency curve for air propellers

Description: This report presents a formula which may be used to obtain a "general efficiency curve" in addition to the well-known maximum efficiency curve. These two curves, when modified somewhat by experimental data, enable performance calculations to be made without detailed knowledge of the propeller. The curves may also be used to estimate the improvement in efficiency due to reduction gearing, or to judge the performance of a new propeller design.
Date: 1923
Creator: Diehl, Walter S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department