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Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: Report defines the principal terms which have come into use in the development of aeronautics. It was prepared in cooperation with a committee engaged upon a similar undertaking in Great Britain. As a result this nomenclature is in substantial agreement with the one which has been adopted by the aeronautical authorities of Great Britain.
Date: 1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for Aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.
Date: January 1, 1924
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author).
Date: January 1, 1923
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomogram for correcting drag and angle of attack of an airfoil model in an air stream of finite diameter

Description: In experimenting with airfoil models in a wind tunnel, the magnitude of the forces acting on the model is affected by the fact that the air stream in which the model is suspended, has a restricted cross-section. In order to utilize the results for an airplane in an unlimited quantity of air, a correction must be made. The magnitude of this correction was determined by Prandtl by the application of his wing theory.
Date: December 1924
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: The purpose of the Committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. This report supersedes all previous publications of the Committee on this subject.
Date: January 1, 1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a Special Conference on Aeronautical Nomenclature by the executive committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held on August 19, 1924, at which meeting Dr. Joseph S. Ames was appointed chairman of the conference. The conference was composed of representatives of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and specially appointed representatives officially designated by the Army Air Service, the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department, the Bureau of Standards, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.
Date: January 1, 1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Conference on Aircraft Structures

Description: This document contains reproductions of technical papers on some of the most recent research results on aircraft structures from the NACA Laboratories. These papers were presented by members of the staff of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA conference held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory March 7, 1951. The purpose of this conference was to convey to those involved in the study of aircraft structures these recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity for discussion of these results. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the conference so that distribution of them might be prompt. The original presentation and this record are considered as complimentary to, rather than as substitute for, the Committee?s system of complete and formal reports.
Date: March 7, 1951
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Conference on high-speed aerodynamics

Description: This document contains reproductions of technical papers presented by staff members of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA Conference on High-Speed Aerodynamics held at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory of the NACA, March 18, 19, and 20, 1958. The primary purpose of this conference was to convey to the military services and their contractors the results of recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity to discuss the results. The papers in this document were prepared for presentation at the conference and are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee's more complete and formal reports.
Date: 1958-03-18/1958-03-20
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Present status of aircraft instruments

Description: This report gives a brief description of the present state of development and of the performance characteristics of instruments included in the following group: speed instruments, altitude instruments, navigation instruments, power-plant instruments, oxygen instruments, instruments for aerial photography, fog-flying instruments, general problems, summary of instrument and research problems. The items considered under performance include sensitivity, scale errors, effects of temperature and pressure, effects of acceleration and vibration, time lag, damping, leaks, elastic defects, and friction.
Date: January 1, 1932
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The law relating to air currents

Description: In the subdivided wing section profile, the diagram of the current is entirely changed and the harmful formation of eddies is avoided through premature deflection. Pressure equalization does not occur between the upper and under sides. This report presents a discussion of the various laws relating to wing design with the conclusion being that lift increases with more acute angles of attack.
Date: March 1, 1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The law relating to air currents

Description: Discussed here are the aerodynamics of a subdivided wing section. The emphasis is upon the increase of lift with more acute angles of attack. Also discussed are wind tunnel tests of the relations among wind resistance, lift, angle of attack, and velocity.
Date: March 1, 1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Load assumptions for calculating the strength of airplanes

Description: The following load assumptions shall be taken as the basis of the strength calculations. Certain definite load conditions (e.g. of flight, control, landing and transport) shall be assumed. The loads shall be assumed to be safe loads, constant or only slowly variable, and the inertia forces due to elastic deformation are accordingly disregarded. The external forces, the force of gravity and the inertia forces on the whole airplane shall produce a condition of equilibrium.
Date: September 1, 1930
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Location of center of pressure of airplane wings

Description: Data obtained in the Gottingen Aerodynamic Laboratory give considerable detail on the resulting air force moment exerted on various wing sections at different angles of attack. The Gottingen data can serve well to test the hydrodynamic theory, which (on the assumption of uniform motion and hence of infinitely wide wings) renders it possible to compute this moment as a function of the angle of attack. The Gottigen data can well serve to test the theory and it may be noted that experiment and computation compare favorably.
Date: November 1, 1922
Creator: MISES
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department