146 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

High-Speed Load Distribution of the Wing of a 3/16-Scale Model of the Douglas XSB2D-1 Airplane with Flaps Deflected

Description: "The tests reported herein were made for the purpose of determining the high-speed load distribution on the wing of a 3/16 scale model of the Douglas XSB2D-1 airplane. Comparisons are made between the root bending moment and section torsional moment coefficients as obtained experimentally and derived analytically. The results show good correlation for the bending moment coefficients but considerable disagreement for the torsional moment coefficients, the measured moments being greater than the analytical moments. The effects of Mach number on both the bending moment and torsional moment coefficients were small" (p. 1).
Date: February 5, 1947
Creator: Barnes, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Transonic Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a Seaplane Configuration having a 40 Deg Sweptback Wing, TED No. NACA DE 387

Description: From Summary: "During the course of an aerodynamic loads investigation of a model of the Martin XP6M-1 flying boat in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel, longitudinal-aerodynamic-performance information was obtained. Data were obtained at speeds up to and exceeding those anticipated for the seaplane in level flight and included the Mach number range from 0.84. to 1.09. The angle of attack was varied from -2deg to 6deg and the average Reynolds number, based on wing mean aerodynamic chord, was about 3.7 x 10(exp 6)."
Date: April 6, 1956
Creator: Hieser, Gerald; Kudlacik, Louis & Gray, W. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Tests of a 1/8-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE319

Description: Tests were made with a 1/8-scale dynamically similar model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was ditched in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, by recording time histories of the accelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings. From the results of the tests it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the near-stall, tail-down attitude (12 deg). The flaps should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing-tip tanks should be jettisoned. The underside of the fuselage will be critically damaged in a ditching and the airplane will dive violently after a run of about three fuselage lengths. Maximum longitudinal decelerations up to about 7g and maximum vertical accelerations up to about 5g will be encountered.
Date: January 19, 1948
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J., Jr. & McBride, Ellis E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Tests of the 1/25-Scale Powered Model of the Martin JRM-1 Airplane. 4 - Tests with Ground Board and with Modified Wing and Hull - TED No. NACA 232, Part 4, Tests with Ground Board and with Modified Wing and Hull, TED No. NACA 232

Description: From Summary: "Wind-tunnel tests were made of a 1/25 scale model of the Martin JRM-1 airplane to determine: (1) The longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the JRM-1 model near the water and lateral and directional stability characteristics with power while moving on the surface of the water, the latter being useful for the design of tip floats; (2) The stability and stalling characteristics of the wing with a modified airfoil contour; (3) Stability characteristics of a hull of larger design gross weight; The test results indicated that the elevator was powerful enough to trim the original model in a landing configuration at any lift coefficient within the specified range of centers of gravity."
Date: September 4, 1947
Creator: Lockwood, Vernard E. & Smith, Bernard J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Results of Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of X24C-4B Turbojet Engine. 5 - Performance of Modified Engine

Description: From Summary: "An investigation has been conducted in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel to evaluate the performance characteristics of a modified X24C-4B turbojet engine over a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 45,000 feet, simulated flight Mach numbers from 0.25 to 1.07, and engine speeds from 4000 to 12,500 rpm. The engine was modified by the manufacturer to improve the velocity and temperature profiles within the engine. Performance data are graphically presented to show the effect of altitude at a flight Mach number of 0.25 and the effect of flight Mach number at an altitude of 25,000 feet."
Date: 1947
Creator: Prince, William R. & Bloomer, Harry E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the flight test of a 0.13-scale rocket-boosted model of the McDonnell F4H-1 airplane between Mach numbers of 0.20 and 1.90: TED No. NACA AD 3115

Description: From Summary: "A flight test was conducted with a 0.13-scale rocket-boosted model of the McDonnell F4H-1 airplane configuration at transonic and supersonic speeds. The external drag coefficient varied from a value of 0.044 at a Mach number of 1.17 to 0.045 at a Mach number of 1.40 and then decreased to 0.041 at a Mach number of 1.90. The limited oscillatory data available indicate the existence of a coupled longitudinal-lateral motion in the Mach number range from 0.20 to 1.17."
Date: November 8, 1957
Creator: Hastings, Earl C., Jr. & Dickens, Waldo L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-spinning-tunnel investigation of a 1/30-scale model of the Grumman XS2F-1 airplane: TED No. NACA DE 366

Description: Report presenting an investigation of a 1/30-scale model of the Grumman XS2F-1 airplane in the 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model in the design flight condition and with the center of gravity at 30 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. Results regarding the erect spins, inverted spins, spin-recovery parachutes, influence of power, control forces, landing condition, and recommended recovery technique are provided.
Date: September 17, 1952
Creator: Healy, Frederick M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-spinning-tunnel investigation of a 1/28-scale model of the North American FJ-4 airplane: TED No. NACA AD-3112

Description: Report presenting an investigation in the 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/28-scale dynamic model of the North American FJ-4 airplane. Results indicated that either a flat-type or a steep-type spin maybe obtained when the airplane is spinning erect. Results regarding inverted spins, loading condition, spin-recovery rocket tests, and spin-recovery parachute tests are provided.
Date: February 11, 1958
Creator: Healy, Frederick M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-spinning tunnel investigation of the 1/21-scale model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane: TED No. NACA DE 362

Description: Report presenting an investigation of a 1/21-scale model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane in the 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics for combat loading in the clean condition. Results regarding erect spins, inverted spins, spin-recovery parachutes, and recommended recovery technique are provided.
Date: November 9, 1951
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Healy, Frederick M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability and Control Data Obtained from Tests of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Goodyear XZP5K Airship, TED No. NACA DE 211

Description: Static longitudinal and lateral stability and control data are presented of an investigation on a l/15-scale model of the Goodyear XZP5K airship over a pitch and yaw range of +/-20 deg and 0 deg to 30 deg, respectively, for various rudder and elevator deflections. Two tail configurations of different plan forms were tested and wake and boundary-layer surveys were conducted. Testing was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel at a Reynolds number of approximately 16.5 x 10(exp 6) based on hull length, and corresponds to a Mach number of about 0.12.
Date: January 25, 1956
Creator: Cannon, Michael D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of the lift, drag, and stability of 1/10-scale rocket-boosted models of the McDonnell XF3H-1 airplane for a Mach number range of 0.6 to 1.4 as affected by the operation of extensible rocket racks : TED No. NACA DE 351

Description: Report presenting a flight investigation using two rocket-boosted scale models of the McDonnell XF3H-1 airplane to determine the aerodynamic effects of operating internally stowed extensible rocket racks during transonic flight. Operation of the racks generally had only a small effect on the aerodynamic characteristics with the exception of drag.
Date: January 26, 1954
Creator: Crabill, Norman L. & McFall, John C., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Brief Investigation of the Hydrodynamic Characteristics of a 1/13.33-Scale Powered Dynamic Model of a Preliminary Design of the Martin XP6M-1 Flying Boat, TED No. NACA DE-385

Description: The hydrodynamic characteristics of a preliminary design of the Martin XP6M-1 flying boat have been determined. Longitudinal stability during take-off and landing, resistance of the complete model, and behavior during taxiing and landing in rough water are presented.
Date: October 21, 1953
Creator: Blanchard, Ulysse J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics including effects of transonic area rule and wing modification of a 0.10-scale model of the Douglas A4D-1 airplane at transonic speeds: TED No. NACA AD 3114

Description: Report presenting force tests of a 0.10-scale model of the Douglas A4D-1 airplane in the 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel to investigate the static longitudinal characteristics of wing and fuselage modifications and the static lateral characteristics of the basic model. Tests were conducted over a range of Mach numbers and angles of attack.
Date: August 17, 1956
Creator: Wornom, Dewey E. & Bollech, Thomas V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary Investigation in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel of the Spin and Recovery Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XFU-1 Airplane, Ted No. NACA DE 311

Description: An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the effects of decreasing the rudder deflection, of decreasing the rudder span, and of differential rudder movements on the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The results indicated that decreasing the rudder span or the rudder deflections, individually or jointly, did not seriously alter the spin or recovery characteristics of the model; and recovery by normal use of controls (full rapid rudder reversal followed l/2 to 1 turn later by movement of the stick forward of neutral) remained satisfactory. Linking the original rudders so that the inboard rudder moves from full with the spin to neutral while the outboard rudder moves from neutral to full against the spin will also result in satisfactory spin and recovery characteristics. Calculations of rudder-pedal forces for recovery showed that the expected forces would probably be within the capabilities of a pilot but that it would be advisable to install some type of boost in the control system to insure easy and rapid movement of the rudders.
Date: 1948
Creator: Berman, Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Transonic Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Trim and Dynamic Response Characteristics of the Horizontal Tail of a 1/7-Scale Model of the Complete Tail of the Grumman XF10F-1 Airplane

Description: An investigation was made of the trim and dynamic response characteristics of the free-floating horizontal tail of a 1/7-scale model of the complete tail of the Grumman XF10F-1 airplane in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel at Mach numbers up to 1.13. The complete tail was mounted in the tunnel on a 3deg conical support body. Various configurations were investigated. A loss in damping of the horizontal tail at transonic speeds was shown by both tunnel and flight tests. The loss in damping extended over a greater Mach number range and the maximum loss occurred at a higher Mach number in the tunnel tests. Large-amplitude oscillations of the horizontal tail of the basic configuration which occurred at low supersonic Mach numbers appeared to be primarily due to the vertical tail of the basic configuration and the interference effects associated with this tail. Secondary factors contributing to the development of the large-amplitude oscillations of the horizontal tail of the basic configuration were probably the loss in damping of the horizontal tail at transonic speeds and the turbulence of the airstream itself.
Date: April 28, 1953
Creator: Luoma, Arvo A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Investigation of a 1/12-Scale Model of the Douglas F3D-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 381

Description: An investigation of a 1/12- scale dynamically similar model of the Douglas F3D-2 airplane was made in calm water to observe the ditching behavior and to determine the safest procedure for making an emergency water landing. Various conditions of damage were simulated to determine the behavior which probably would occur in a full-scale ditching. The behavior of the model was determined from motion-picture records, time- history acceleration records, and visual observations. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at a medium high attitude of about 8 degrees with the landing flaps down 40 degrees. In calm water the airplane will probably make a smooth run of about 550 feet and will have a maximum longitudinal deceleration of about 3g. The fuselage bottom will probably be damaged enough to allow the fuselage to fill with water very rapidly.
Date: 1952
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Thompson, William C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary Investigation in the Langley Free-Spinning Tunnel of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Douglas XF4D-1 Airplane Including Spin-Recovery Parachute Tests of the Model Loaded to Simulate the Douglas F5D-1 Airplane

Description: A supplementary investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel of a l/20-scale model of the Douglas XF4D-1 airplane to determine the effect of only neutralizing the rudder for recovery from an inverted spin, and the effect of partial aileron deflection with the spin for recovery from an erect spin. An estimation of the size parachute required for satisfactory recovery from a spin with the model ballasted to represent the Douglas F5D-1 (formerly the Douglas XF4D-2) airplane was also made. Results of the original investigation on the XF4D-1 design are presented in NACA RM SL50K30a. The results indicated that satisfactory recoveries from inverted spins of the airplane should be obtained by rudder neutralization when the longitudinal stick position is neutral or forward. Recoveries from erect spins from the normal-spin control configuration should be satisfactory by full rudder reversal with simultaneous movement of the ailerons to two-thirds with the spin. For the parachute tests with the model loaded to represent the F5D-1 airplane, the tests indicated that a 16.7-foot-diameter hemispherical-tail parachute (drag coefficient of 1.082 based on the projected area) with a towline 20.0 feet long (full- scale values) should be satisfactory for an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane.
Date: November 21, 1955
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the Low-Speed Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Douglas XF4D-1 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel TED No. NACA DE 349

Description: An investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/10-scale model of the Douglas XF4D-1 airplane has been made in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The model was flown with leading-edge slats retracted and extended over a lift-coefficient range from 0.5 to the stall. Only relatively low-altitude conditions were simulated and no attempt was made to determine the effect on the stability characteristics of freeing the controls. The longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the model were satisfactory for all conditions investigated except near the stall with slats extended, where the model had a slight nosing-up tendency. The lateral stability and control characteristics of the model were considered satisfactory for all conditions investigated except near the stall with slats retracted, where a change in sign of the static- directional-stability parameter Cn(sub beta) caused the model to be directionally divergent. The addition of an extension to the top of the vertical tail did not increase Cn(sub beta) enough to eliminate the directional divergence of the model, but a large increase in Cn(sub beta) that was obtainable by artificial means appeared to eliminate the divergence and flights near the stall could be made. Artificially increasing the stability derivative-Cn(sub r) (yawing moment due to yawing) and Cn(sub p) (yawing moment due to rolling) had little effect on the divergence for the range of these parameters investigated. Calculations indicate that the damping of the lateral oscillation of the airplane with slats retracted or extended will be satisfactory at sea level but will be only marginally satisfactory at 40,000 feet.
Date: 1951
Creator: Johnson, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Yawed-Landing Investigation of a Model of the Convair Y2-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 363

Description: A model of the Convair Y2-2 airplane was tested in Langley tank no. 2 to determine whether satisfactory stability in yawed landings was possible with a certain ventral fin. Free-body landings were made in smooth and rough water at two speeds and two rates of descent with the model yawed 15deg. The behavior of the model was determined by visual observations and from motion-picture re.cords. It was concluded that satisfactory stability was possible with the ventral fin as tested but that the characteristics of the model shock absorbers and the settings of the elevon control surfaces had an appreciable influence on behavior.
Date: 1951
Creator: Hoffman, Edward L. & Fisher, Lloyd J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary Investigation in the Free-Spinning Tunnel of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F9F-6 Airplane Incorporating only Flaperons for Lateral Control, TED No. NACA DE 364

Description: A supplementary investigation was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman F9F-6 airplane. The primary purpose of the investigation was to reevaluate the spin-recovery characteristics of the airplane in view of the fact that the ailerons had been eliminated from the flaperon-aileron lateral control system of the airplane. A spin-tunnel investigation on a model of the earlier version of the F9F-6 airplane had indicated that use of ailerons with the spin (stick right in a right spin) was essential to insure recovery. The results indicate that with.ailerons eliminated, it may be difficult to obtain an erect developed spin but if a fully developed spin is obtained on the airplane, recovery therefrom may be difficult or impossible. Flaperon deflection should have little effect on spins or recoveries.
Date: November 18, 1954
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Lee, Henry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ditching Investigation of a 1/11-Scale Model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 Airplane, TED NO. NACA DE 360

Description: An investigation was made of a 1/11-scale dynamically similar model of the Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and configurations were investigated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, acceleration records, and motion-picture records of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, time-history acceleration curves, and plots of attitude change against time after contact. From the results of the investigation, it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the lowest speed and highest attitude consistent with adequate control. The aft part of the fuselage and the main landing-gear doors will probably be damaged. In a calm-water ditching under these conditions the airplane will probably skip slightly and then porpoise for the remainder of the run. Maximum longitudinal decelerations will be about 3 1/2g and maximum normal accelerations will be about 7g in a landing run of about 500 feet.
Date: 1955
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Windham, John O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W Airplane

Description: An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/24-scale model of the Grumman AF-2S, -2W airplane was conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of controls on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics for a range of possible loadings of the.airplane were determined. The effect of a revised-tail installation (small dual fins added to the stabilizer of the original tail and the vertical-tail height of the original tail increased) and the effect of various ventral-fin and antispin-fillet installations were determined. The investigation also included spin-recovery parachute tests.
Date: March 12, 1950
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Wilson, Jack H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Additional Results on the Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of a 0.05-Scale Model of the Convair F2Y-1 Airplane at High Subsonic Speeds

Description: Additional results on the static longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics of a 0.05-scale model of the Convair F2Y-1 water-based fighter airplane were obtained in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.92. The maximum angle-of-attack range (obtained at the lower Mach numbers) was from -2 degrees to 25 degrees. The sideslip-angle range investigated was from -4 degrees to 12 degrees. The investigation included effects of various arrangements of wing fences, leading-edge chord-extensions, and leading-edge notches. Various fuselage fences, spoilers, and a dive brake also were investigated. From overall considerations of lift, drag, and pitching moments, it appears that there were two modifications somewhat superior to any of the others investigated: One was a configuration that employed a full-chord fence and a partial-chord fence located at 0.63 semispan and 0.55 semispan, respectively. The second was a leading-edge chord-extension that extended from 0.68 semispan to 0.85 semispan in combination with a leading-edge notch located at 0.68 semispan. With plus or minus 10 degrees aileron, the estimated wing-tip helix angle was reduced from 0.125 at a Mach number of 0.50 to 0.088 at a Mach number of 0.92, with corresponding rates of roll of 4.0 and 5.2 radians per second. The upper aft fuselage dive brake, when deflected 30 degrees and 60 degrees, reduced the rudder effectiveness about 10 to 20 percent and about 35 to 50 percent, respectively.
Date: August 10, 1954
Creator: Spreeman, Kenneth P. & Few, Albert G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Flying-Boat Hull Having a Length-Beam Ratio of 15, TED No. NACA 2206

Description: An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a flying-boat hull of a length-beam ratio of 15 in the presence of a wing. The investigation was an extension of previous tests made on hulls of length-beam ratios of 6, 9, and 12; these hulls were designed to have approximately the same hydrodynamic performance with respect to spray and resistance characteristics. Comparison with the previous investigation at lower length-beam ratios indicated a reduction in minimum drag coefficients of 0.0006 (10 peroent)with fixed transition when the length-beam ratio was extended from 12 to 15. As with the hulls of lower length-beam ratio, the drag reduction with a length-beam ratio of 15 occurred throughout the range of angle of attack tested and the angle of attack for minimum drag was in the range from 2deg to 3deg. Increasing the length-beam ratio from 12 to 15 reduced the hull longitudinal instability by an mount corresponding to an aerodynamic-center shift of about 1/2 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord of the hypothetical flying boat. At an angle of attack of 2deg, the value of the variation of yawing-moment coefficient with angle of yaw for a length-beam ratio of 15 was 0.00144, which was 0.00007 larger than the value for a length-beam ratio of 12.
Date: January 23, 1951
Creator: Riebe, John M. & Naeseth, Rodger L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department