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2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report

Description: Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.
Date: June 1, 2010
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corporate Energy Conservation Program for Alcoa North American Extrusions: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Aluminum BestPractices Management Case Study

Description: This case study is the latest in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. The case studies document the activities, savings, and lessons learned on these projects.
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Bioenergy Center: Laying the Foundation for Biorefineries

Description: A fact sheet explaining the National Bioenergy Center and its programs to stakeholders and visitors: An inclusive center without walls applying resources of the U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory System to advance technology for producing fuels, chemicals, materials, and power from biomass. National Bioenergy Center expertise, capabilities, facilities, and technologies can be made available to you through cooperative research and development agreements, work-for-others agreements, licenses, and other collaborative business arrangements. Please contact us about the research and development work you want to do.
Date: August 1, 2005
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise, St. Louis, Missouri; Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies (Revised)

Description: This publication is one in an ongoing series of case studies for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for all those who plan, design, and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This study describes how the Nidus Center, a nonprofit incubator for life sciences and plan biotechnology established by Monsanto Company, employs daylighting, an energy-efficient mechanical system featuring energy recovery, and water conservation practices, among others, to save energy and money and help conserve natural resources.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory

Description: Fact sheet describing NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (ReFUEL). ReFUEL is a world-class research and testing facility dedicated to future fuels and advanced heavy-duty vehicle research, located in Denver, Colorado.
Date: August 1, 2004
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Withdrawal of Public Lands Within and Surrounding the Caliente Rail Corridor, Nevada

Description: The purpose for agency action is to preclude surface entry and the location of new mining claims, subject to valid existing rights, within and surrounding the Caliente rail corridor as described in the Yucca Mountain FEIS (DOE 2002). This protective measure is needed to enhance the safe, efficient, and uninterrupted evaluation of land areas for potential rail alignments within the Caliente rail corridor. The evaluation will assist the DOE in determining, through the Rail Alignment environmental impact statement (EIS) process, whether to construct a branch rail line, and to provide support to the BLM in deciding whether or not to reserve a ROW for the rail line under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA). The BLM participated as a cooperating agency in preparing this EA because it is the responsible land manager and BLM staff could contribute resource specific expertise.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Office of Science and Technology and International Science and Technology Program Plan September 2005

Description: This program plan articulates the five-year goals and objectives for the Science and Technology (S and T) Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The S and T Program is intended to reduce the cost of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository and enhance the understanding of the processes affecting its performance through the application of new scientific understanding and technology. While the design for the proposed repository will provide a safe and effective disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW), it is unreasonable to assume the science and technology supporting the repository today will remain unchanged over the more than 50 years that the repository will be in operation. In fact, continuous improvement in operations and enhanced knowledge of the disposal process is expected to a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license holder. therefore, it is prudent to support an effort within OCRWM to assure that the proposed repository will be able to use advanced technology that becomes available in the future to reduce cost to the taxpayer and utility ratepayer. As a separate office within OCRWM, the S and T Program supports the proposed Yucca Mountain repository operations and transportation activities; together these are henceforth referred to as the Repository System.
Date: September 12, 2005
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OCRWM Science & Technology Program Materials Performance Targeted Thrust Fact Sheet

Description: In severe corrosive or abrasive environments, steel is rarely used since the range of properties available, in existing steels, are insufficient, resulting in the prevalent usage of either corrosion resistant materials like nickel based superalloys or abrasion resistant materials like tungsten carbide based hardmetals. Recently, a host of carbide based alloys including WC-Co-Cr, NiCr-Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, WC-Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-Ni etc. have been developed in an attempt to bridge the gap between providing both wear and corrosion protection. In this presentation, data will be presented showing how a newly developed steel coating, SAM2X5, with an amorphous/nanocomposite structure can bridge the gap between conventional metallic alloys and ceramic hardmetal performance with excellent combinations of properties including corrosion resistance superior to nickel superalloys in a number of environments and wear resistance approaching that of tungsten carbide cobalt. The unique combination of damage tolerance developed should be especially applicable for the replacement of electrolytic hard chromium.
Date: October 6, 2005
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessing Energy Use in Your Plant

Description: This DOE Industrial Technologies Program fact sheet describes ITP resources and software that industrial plants can use for energy assessments that result in greater energy efficiency and lower costs.
Date: February 1, 2006
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages

Description: A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly …
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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