150,206 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Report on the Explosion, Fire, and Oil Spill, Resulting in One Fatality and Injury on September 21, 1978, at Well 6 of Cavern 6 at the West Hackberry, Louisiana, Oil Storage Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

Description: The following report is the independent product of the Accident Investigation Committee which was commissioned by the Department of Energy following the accident on September 21, 1978, at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve site at West Hackberry, Louisiana.
Date: November 1978
Creator: United States. Department of Energy.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactivity Initiated Accident Test Series RIA Scoping Test Experiment Operating Specification

Description: This document describes the experiment operating specifications for the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Scoping Test to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The primary objectives of the RIA research are to determine fuel failure thresholds, modes, and consequences as functions of (a) enthalpy insertion, (b) irradiation history, and (c) fuel design. Coolant conditions of pressure, temperature, and flow rate that are typical of hot-startup conditions in commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) will be used in the first six RIA tests, termed Series I.
Date: June 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactivity Initiated Accident Test Series Test RIA 1-1 Experiment Operating Specification

Description: This document describes the experiment operating specifications for the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-1 to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The RIA Series I research objectives are to determine fuel failure thresholds, modes and consequences as functions of enthalpy insertion, irradiation history, and fuel design. Coolant conditions of pressure, temperature, and flow rate that are typical of hot-startup conditions in commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) will be used. The first test in Series I, Test RIA 1-1, will be comprised of four individual rods, each surrounded by a separate flow shroud. Two rods will be preirradiated and two rods will be unirradiated. The specific objectives of the test are to: (1) characterize the response of unirradiated and preirradiated fuel rods during a RIA event conducted at BWR hot-startup conditions and (2) evaluate test instrumentation response during an RIA. The test sequence will begin with steady state power operation to condition the fuel (pellet cracking and relocation) and determine the fuel rod power calibration. The loop will then be cooled down, the test train removed from the in-pile tube, and one of the unirradiated rods will be removed for fission product analysis and replaced with an identical unirradiated rod. The transient fuel rod energy deposition for Test RIA 1-1 will be chosen from the fuel rod response vs. energy deposition data observed in the first three phases of the RIA Scoping Test. It is anticipated that a fuel pellet surface energy deposition of about 1100 J/g will be required to ensure cladding failure of all four rods. The design of the test fuel rods, test assembly, and instrumentation associated with Test RIA 1-1 are described. The experiment conduct for the test is described. The data recording and reduction requirements are ...
Date: August 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactivity Initiated Accident Test Series Test RIA 1-2 Experiment Operating Specification

Description: This document describes the experiment operating specifications for the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-2 to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The RIA Series I research objectives are to determine fuel failure thresholds, modes and consequences as functions of enthalpy insertion, irradiation history, and fuel design. Coolant conditions of pressure, temperature, and flow rate that are typical of hot-startup conditions in commercial boiling water reactors {BWRs) will be used. The second test in Series I, Test RIA 1-2, will be comprised of four individual rods, each surrounded by a separate flow shroud. The four rods will be preirradiated. The specific objectives of the test are to: (1) characterize the response of preirradiated fuel rods during a RIA event conducted at BWR hot-startup conditions and (2) evaluate the effect of internal rod pressure on preirradiated fuel rod transient response. The test sequence will begin with steady state power operation to condition the fuel (pellet cracking and relocation) and determine the fuel rod power calibration. The loop will then be cooled down, the test train removed from the in-pile tube, and the cobalt flux wires that are mounted on each flow shroud will be replaced. The transient fuel rod energy deposition for the Test RIA 1-2 rods will be chosen from the fuel rod response vs. energy deposition observed in the first three phases of the RIA Scoping Test and the first test of Series J, Test RIA 1-1. The design of the test fuel rods, test assembly, and instrumentation associated with Test RIA 1-2 are described. The planned experiment conduct for the test is described. The data recording and reduction requirements are provided. The posttest operations support and the postirradiation examination requirements associated with Test RIA 1-2 are described.
Date: July 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Microturbine Systems

Description: Dept. of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-00-CH11061 was originally awarded to Honeywell International, Inc. – Honeywell Power Systems Inc. (HPSI) division located in Albuquerque, NM in October 2000 to conduct a program titled Advanced Microturbine Systems (AMS). The DOE Advanced Microturbines Systems Program was originally proposed as a five-year program to design and develop a high efficiency, low emissions, durable microturbine system. The period of performance was to be October 2000 through September 2005. Program efforts were underway, when one year into the program Honeywell sold the intellectual property of Honeywell Power Systems Inc. and HPSI ceased business operations. Honeywell made an internal decision to restructure the existing program due to the HPSI shutdown and submitted a formal request to DOE on September 24, 2001 to transfer the Cooperative Agreement to Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services (HES&S) in Phoenix, AZ in order to continue to offer support for DOE's Advanced Microturbine Program. Work continued on the descoped program under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00-CH11061 and has been completed.
Date: December 31, 2005
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2006 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Discovering the Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

Description: The Department of Energy Organization Act, which created DOE, was enacted in 1977 and DOE officially came into existence in October of that year. That law brought together for the first time, not only most of the government’s energy programs, but also science and technology programs and defense responsibilities that included the design, construction, and testing of nuclear weapons. Over its history, DOE has shifted its emphasis and focus as the energy and security needs of the Nation have changed. Today, DOE stands at the forefront of helping the Nation meet our energy, scientific, environmental, and national security goals. These include developing and deploying new energy technologies, reducing our dependence on foreign energy sources, protecting our nuclear weapons stockpile, and ensuring that America remains competitive in the global marketplace. To help achieve these goals, President Bush has launched two key initiatives: the American Competitiveness Initiative (ACI) and the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI). The President launched these initiatives recognizing that science, technology, and engineering hold the answers to many of the critical challenges our world faces. These new initiatives to spur scientific innovation and technology development expand DOE’s continuing support for the competitive energy markets, both domestically and internationally, and of policies that facilitate continued private investment in the energy sector. In addition, DOE supports the demonstration and deployment of energy technologies through collaborative efforts with the private sector and public sector entities.
Date: October 11, 2006
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Turbo-Charging Research and Development

Description: The objective of this project is to conduct analysis, design, procurement and test of a high pressure ratio, wide flow range, and high EGR system with two stages of turbocharging. The system needs to meet the stringent 2010MY emissions regulations at 20% + better fuel economy than its nearest gasoline competitor while allowing equivalent vehicle launch characteristics and higher torque capability than its nearest gasoline competitor. The system will also need to meet light truck/ SUV life requirements, which will require validation or development of components traditionally used only in passenger car applications. The conceived system is termed 'seriessequential turbocharger' because the turbocharger system operates in series at appropriate times and also sequentially when required. This is accomplished using intelligent design and control of flow passages and valves. Components of the seriessequential system will also be applicable to parallel-sequential systems which are also expected to be in use for future light truck/SUV applications.
Date: February 27, 2008
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Internal Technical Report, Management Plan for Fluid Supply and Injection System for the Raft River 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant

Description: This report details a plan for developing a fluid supply system for the First 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant at Raft River. The pilot plant has been specifically designed to use the medium-temperature geothermal water so common throughout the West. EG and G Idaho, Inc., the Department of Energy Raft River Rural Electric Co-op, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the State of Idaho have worked together to develop a facility that will use an organic liquid as the working fluid. Four wells have been drilled in the Raft River Valley, about ten miles South of Malta, in southern Idaho. The completed well system will consist of seven wells: two conventional injection wells, three production wells, and a standby reserve well of each type. The additional three wells are to be drilled in FY-1978, in order to complete a coordinated test program before the First Pilot Power Plant is ready for operation. The system has been designed to meet the test-loop pilot plant's basic requirement: a 2450 gpm supply of geothermal fluid, at a nominal temperature of 290 F and with salinity of less than 5000 ppm. Injection of cooled geothermal fluid into the Raft River reservoir will also require a network of monitor wells. The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR), USGS, EG and G Idaho, and the Department of Energy will jointly select sites for two 1500-foot and five 500-foot monitoring wells. This plan considers the work required to complete construction of the fluid supply system and obtain a preliminary check of its performance capability; the plan will discuss project management, costs, schedules, drilling, testing, environmental monitoring, and safety.
Date: January 9, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL Carbon Metabolism Modeling Intends to Make Biofuels Engineering Routine and Reliable (Fact Sheet)

Description: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) scientists, supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program, have assembled and simulated a model of key eukaryotic carbon metabolism that intends to move biochemical simulations into new realms of chemical fidelity.
Date: February 1, 2011
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL Certifies First All-Quantum-Dot Photovoltaic Cell; Demonstrates Stability, Performance (Fact Sheet)

Description: Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have certified the first all-quantum-dot photovoltaic cell, which was based on lead sulfide and demonstrated reasonable quantum dot solar cell performance for an initial efficiency measurement along with good stability. The certified open-circuit voltage of the quantum dot cell is greater than that possible from bulk lead sulfide because of quantum confinement.
Date: February 1, 2011
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

Description: This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.
Date: December 1, 2010
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL Discovers Novel Protein Interaction in Green Algae that Suggests New Strategies to Improve Hydrogen Photoproduction (Fact Sheet)

Description: A research team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered a specific interaction between the protein ferredoxin - responsible for distributing reductants from photosynthesis to different metabolic pathways - and the HYDA2 hydrogenase, suggesting a role for HYDA2 in photohydrogen production.
Date: February 1, 2011
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technology Enhancement Study

Description: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) has designed and tested a nominal 10-MeV prototype Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) inspection system to detect shielded nuclear material. This report highlights two specific areas that will provide further PPA technology enhancements, namely, an optimal gamma-ray detection system and the off axis radiation detection sensitivity. Detection of low-atomic number (Z) shielded nuclear material had been initially addressed by the inclusion of dedicated Geiger-Müller (GM) detectors co-located above each of the Photonuclear Neutron Detectors (PNDs). Several different radiation detectors were investigated to assess if this type of gamma-ray detector was optimal. The LND 719 GM detector was shown to have the best photon sensitivity and demonstrated an optimal ability to detect low-Z shielded nuclear material. Beyond the technical performance of this detector, its low cost and availability makes it a logical choice for a field-deployable system. In terms of off-axis detection sensitivity, simulation and benchmarking experiments have indicated that the PPA inspection system can successfully detect nuclear material (within 120 seconds) in various shielding configurations even when it is located at a distance of as much as 30 cm off the interrogating beam axis (the exact sensitivity to off-axis interrogations will be largely dependent on the actual shielding material). As a general rule, high-Z shielding will allow detection at larger off-axis distances than low-Z materials.
Date: April 1, 2006
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department