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Waste Crate and Container Imaging Using the Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

Description: The Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System (VACIS) is a highly penetrating gamma ray imaging system that provides a means to non-invasively image crate contents prior to crate disassembly. The VACIS unit uses a 1.6 Curie collimated source (Cesium-137) aimed at a linear detector to create an image as the unit passes by the crate. In the demonstrated mobile unit, the source and detector were mounted on a boom truck. As the crate passed between the source and detector, a near real-time composite image of the contents was constructed from the linear image of the VACIS unit's on board computer and recorded on disk.
Date: July 2000
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evidence for a bound H-dibaryon using lattice QCD

Description: The H-dibaryon, a J = 0 state with the valence quark content udsuds, has long been hypothesized to exist because of the attractive nature of color magnetic gluon exchange in the flavor- singlet channel. Using lattice QCD the NPLQCD collaboration have investigated this system and evidence is presented for the existence of a stable H-dibaryon, albeit at a quark mass somewhat larger than that in nature. This calculation is reviewed and combined with subsequent calculations by the HALQCD collaboration at the SU(3) flavor symmetric point to identify bounds on the H-dibaryon mass at the physical quark masses.
Date: April 1, 2012
Creator: Detmold, Will
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Close out of CRADA JSA 2006S008

Description: Based on the JLab study and calculations, Linde made the following changes to the LR1610 heat exchanger. The LR 1610 redesign changed two different aspects of the original LR1610 design. The heat exchanger and the boiler are wrapped differently than the original LR1610 per the following: (A) Heat Exchanger - Section A - Current LR 1610 - 2 wraps - 1 path, Redesign - 2 wraps - 2 paths; Section B: Current LR 1610 - 2 wraps - 1 path, Redesign - 2 wraps - 2 paths; (B) Boiler: Current design - 1 wrap - 2 paths, Redesign - 1 wrap - 1 path. The contents of the attachments are: (1) Assembly - Pictures of the LR1610 Redesign Heat Exchanger after manufacturing; (2) Drawings - 3D and 2D drawings used to fabricate the Redesign LR1610 Heat Exchanger and the Precooler-Boiler; (3) Performance Curves - The expected performance curves and the TS diagram for a single proposed new compressor that is more capacity than the RSX; (4) Test Pictures - Set up bench test of the LR1610 Redesign Heat Exchanger; and (5) Warm Test Data - Warm N2 test data of the LR1610 Redesign Heat Exchanger. Warm test data of the LR1610 Redesign Heat Exchange vs. the warm test data of the two standard LR1610 heat exchangers.
Date: May 2, 2011
Creator: Linde
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

Description: Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 {+-} 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS�s result of -0.567 {+-} 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS�s data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 {+-} 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and identified only naturally occurring or ubiquitous ...
Date: May 28, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 4 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUELS SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TN

Description: Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on June 12, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ≤ 3 indicates at a 99% confidence interval that split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report specifies 95% confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0014 was the exception. The ORAU gross beta result of 6.30 � 0.65 pCi/L from location NRD is well above NFS�s non-detected result of 1.56 � 0.59 pCi/L. NFS�s data package includes no detected result for any radionuclide at location NRD. At NRC�s request, ORAU performed gamma spectroscopic analysis of sample 5198W0014 to identify analytes contributing to the relatively elevated gross beta results. This analysis identified detected amounts of naturally-occurring constituents, most notably Ac-228 from the thorium decay series, and does not suggest the presence of site-related contamination.
Date: August 15, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

Description: Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.
Date: January 21, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Historical collection of preprints, reprints, working papers, correspondence, and other documents related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann.

Description: This historical collection consists of various letters, correspondence, working papers, reprints, preprints, workshop reports, and news clippings related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann. Binders and contents. 1. Laboratory Reprints/Preprints (Laboratory Documents from 9 national Labs. Some original documents); 2. Summary Report by Dr. Duane L. Barney (Articles, Letters, and Reports through 1994 on Cold Fusion. Original Documents); 3. Conference Workshops (Official Documents, schedules, and notes from 4 conferences); 4. HSS&T Hearings, SRI Incident Jan. 1992 (Summary of Cold Fusion Research and reports following SRI Incident. Original Documents); 5. Media 1989 to Present (circa 1995) (Journals, Magazines, Newspapers, and Press Releases from 1989-1995. Some reprints, some original articles/magazines); 6. Science in Service of National Economy aka Manfred's Book (A comprehensive overview of various research being done at Laboratories across the country that could impact the economy); 7. ERAB Information (Comprehensive Report on Cold Fusion Research w/ recommendations on funding and continued research. Original documents); 8. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1989 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion in order of print from 1989. Original documents); 9. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1990-1992 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1990-1992. Original documents); 10. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1993-1995 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1993-1995. Original documents); 11. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution A-H (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 12. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution I-R (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 13. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution S-Z (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 14. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries A-F (Letters, ...
Date: April 1, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined CDF and D0 Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Photons with up to 8.2 fb^-1

Description: We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, focusing on the decay H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. We compute upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section times the decay branching fraction in the range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, and we interpret the results in the context of the standard model. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With datasets corresponding to 7.0 fb{sup -1} (CDF) and 8.2 fb{sup -1} (D0), the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 10.5 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}.
Date: July 1, 2011
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Types of Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

Description: The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle (Contractor) and MDS Sciex (Participant) and ESA, Inc. (Participant) is to research, develop and apply new types of ionization sources and sampling/inlet systems for analytical mass spectrometry making use of the Participants state-of-the-art atmospheric sampling mass spectrometry electrochemical cell technology instrumentation and ancillary equipment. The two overriding goals of this research project are: to understand the relationship among the various instrumental components and operational parameters of the various ion sources and inlet systems under study, the chemical nature of the gases, solvents, and analytes in use, and the nature and abundances of the ions ultimately observed in the mass spectrometer; and to develop new and better analytical and fundamental applications of these ion sources and inlet systems or alternative sources and inlets coupled with mass spectrometry on the basis of the fundamental understanding obtained in Goal 1. The end results of this work are expected to be: (1) an expanded utility for the ion sources and inlet systems under study (such as the analysis of new types of analytes) and the control or alteration of the ionic species observed in the gas-phase; (2) enhanced instrument performance as judged by operational figures-of-merit such as dynamic range, detection limits, susceptibility to matrix signal suppression and sensitivity; and (3) novel applications (such as surface sampling with electrospray) in both applied and fundamental studies. The research projects outlined herein build upon work initiated under the previous CRADA between the Contractor and MDS Sciex on ion sources and inlet systems for mass spectrometry. Specific ion source and inlet systems for exploration of the fundamental properties and practical implementation of these principles are given.
Date: December 1, 2008
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atomistic Processes of Catalyst Degradation

Description: The purpose of this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sasol North America, Inc., and the oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to improve the stability of alumina-based industrial catalysts through the combination of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at ORNL and innovative sample preparation techniques at Sasol. Outstanding progress has been made in task 1, 'Atomistic processes of La stabilization'. STEM investigations provided structural information with single-atom precision, showing the lattice location of La dopant atoms, thus enabling first-principles calculations of binding energies, which were performed in collaboration with Vanderbilt University. The stabilization mechanism turns out to be entirely due to a particularly strong binding energy of the La tom to the {gamma}-alumina surface. The large size of the La atom precludes incorporation of La into the bulk alumina and also strains the surface, thus preventing any clustering of La atoms. Thus highly disperse distribution is achieved and confirmed by STEM images. la also affects relative stability of the exposed surfaces of {gamma}-alumina, making the 100 surface more stable for the doped case, unlike the 110 surface for pure {gamma}-alumina. From the first-principles calculations, they can estimate the increase in transition temperature for the 3% loading of La used commercially, and it is in excellent agreement with experiment. This task was further pursued aiming to generate useable recommendations for the optimization of the preparation techniques for La-doped aluminas. The effort was primarily concentrated on the connection between the boehmitre-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase transition (i.e. catalyst preparation) and the resulting dispersion of La on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. It was determined that the La distribution on boehmite was non-uniform and different from that on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and thus apparently La dispersion happened simultaneously with the boehmite-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase transition. It was further discovered that ...
Date: November 27, 2004
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electronic Structure and Transport in Magnetic Multilayers

Description: ORNL assisted Seagate Recording Heads Operations in the development of CIPS pin Valves for application as read sensors in hard disk drives. Personnel at ORNL were W. H. Butler and Xiaoguang Zhang. Dr. Olle Heinonen from Seagate RHO also participated. ORNL provided codes and materials parameters that were used by Seagate to model CIP GMR in their heads. The objectives were to: (1) develop a linearized Boltzmann transport code for describing CIP GMR based on realistic models of the band structure and interfaces in materials in CIP spin valves in disk drive heads; (2) calculate the materials parameters needed as inputs to the Boltzmann code; and (3) transfer the technology to Seagate Recording Heads.
Date: February 18, 2008
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

Description: This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.
Date: June 27, 2007
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Oral Fomulation of SCV-07 for Use in Tuberculosis

Description: An evaluation of the immunomodulatory peptide SCV-07 was conducted as a possible therapeutic treatment for tuberculosis. This evaluation included mouse models, clinical trials and various forms of the drug such as liquid injection and development of an oral pill. It was found that SCV-07 significantly increased the survival rate of animals infected with lethal doses of Mycobacterium bovis. It enhanced the functional activity of macrophages in a dose-dependent fashion. The combination of SCV-07 with bacteriostatic drugs, such as izoniazid, was particularly effective. Phase II clinical trials in a TB clinic demonstrated that the usage of the injection form of SCV-07 for lung TB treatment in combination with standard chemotherapy decreased the quantity of patients with positive sputum assays for Mycobacteria, promoted healing of cavities in lungs, stabilized parameters of cell immunity, and resulted in a significant improvement in the general condition of patients. Clinical trials results of the oral drug form are still being evaluated.
Date: November 16, 2007
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and Development of a 100 MVA HTS Generator for Commercial Entry

Description: In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: (1) identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator; (2) develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology; (3) perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE's proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept; and (4) design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables. The design for the HTS generator was based on GE's warm iron rotor concept in which a cold HTS coil is wound around a warm magnetic iron pole. This approach for rotating HTS electrical machinery provides the efficiency benefits of the HTS technology while addressing the two most important considerations for power generators in utility applications: cost and reliability. The warm iron rotor concept uses the least amount of expensive HTS wire compared to competing concepts and builds on the very high reliability of conventional iron core stators and armature windings.
Date: June 7, 2007
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Global Regulatory Pathways in the Alphaproteobacteria

Description: A major goal for microbiologists in the twenty-first century is to develop an understanding of the microbial cell in all its complexity. In addition to understanding the function of individual gene products we need to focus on how the cell regulates gene expression at a global level to respond to different environmental parameters. Development of genomic technologies such as complete genome sequencing, proteomics, and global comparisons of mRNA expression patterns allows us to begin to address this issue. This proposal focuses on a number of phylogenetically related bacteria that are involved in environmentally important processes such as carbon sequestration and bioremediation. Genome sequencing projects of a number of these bacteria have revealed the presence of a small family of regulatory genes found thus far only in the alpha-proteobacteria. These genes encode proteins that are related to the global regulatory protein RosR in Rhizobium etli, which is involved in determining nodulation competitiveness in this bacterium. Our goal is to examine the function of the proteins encoded by this gene family in several of the bacteria containing homologs to RosR. We will construct gene disruption mutations in a number of these bacteria and characterize the resulting mutant strains using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and genetic and biochemical techniques. We will thus determine if the other proteins also function as global regulators of gene expression. Using proteomics methods we will identify the specific proteins whose expression varies depending on the presence or absence of the RosR homolog. Over fifty loci regulated by RosR have been identified in R. etli using transposon mutagenesis; this will serve as out benchmark to which we will compare the other regulons. We expect to identify genes regulated by RosR homologs in several bacterial species, including, but not limited to Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Sphingomonas aromaticivorans. In this way we will ...
Date: April 27, 2007
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Reaction Specificity of Nanoparticles in Solution: Application to the Reaction of Nanoparticulate Iron and Iron-Bimetallic Compounds with Chlorinated Hydrocarbons and Oxyanions

Description: The prospect for better remediation technologies using nanoparticles of iron, iron oxides, and iron with catalytic metals (i.e., bimetallics) has potentially transformative implications for environmental management of DOE sites across the country. Of particular interest is the potential to avoid undesirable products from the degradation of chlorinated solvents by taking advantage of the potential selectivity of nanoparticles to produce environmentally benign products from CCl{sub 4}. Chlorinated solvents are the most frequently reported subsurface contaminants across the whole DOE complex, and carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) is the chlorinated solvent that is of greatest concern at Hanford (U. S. Department Energy 2001). In evaluating technologies that might be used at the site, a critical concern will be that CCl{sub 4} reduction usually occurs predominantly by hydrogenolysis to chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and methylene chloride (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), both of which are nearly as problematic as CCl{sub 4} (National Research Council, 1978). Competing reaction pathways produce the more desirable products carbon monoxide (CO) and/or formate (HCOO{sup -}), and possibly CO{sub 2}, but the proportion of reaction that occurs by these pathways is highly variable. Iron-based metallic and oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have enhanced reactivity towards a variety of chemical species, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible oxyanions. Possibly of greater importance is the ability of nanoparticles to select for specific reaction products, potentially facilitating the formation of more environmentally acceptable products. The purpose of this study is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanism responsible for the overall particle reactivity and reaction selectivity of reactive metal and oxide nanoparticles. To achieve this objective the project involves the synthesis (using solution and vacuum synthesis methods) and characterization of well-defined nanoparticles, measurements of particle reactivity in solution or vacuum environments, and theory and modeling efforts to rationalize particle structure and reactivity.
Date: June 1, 2005
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uncooled Micro-Cantilever Infrared Imager Optimization

Description: We report on the development, fabrication and characterization of microcantilever based uncooled focal plane array (FPA) for infrared imaging. By combining a streamlined design of microcantilever thermal transducers with a highly efficient optical readout, we minimized the fabrication complexity while achieving a competitive level of imaging performance. The microcantilever FPAs were fabricated using a straightforward fabrication process that involved only three photolithographic steps (i.e. three masks). A designed and constructed prototype of an IR imager employed a simple optical readout based on a noncoherent low-power light source. The main figures of merit of the IR imager were found to be comparable to those of uncooled MEMS infrared detectors with substantially higher degree of fabrication complexity. In particular, the NETD and the response time of the implemented MEMS IR detector were measured to be as low as 0.5K and 6 ms, respectively. The potential of the implemented designs can also be concluded from the fact that the constructed prototype enabled IR imaging of close to room temperature objects without the use of any advanced data processing. The most unique and practically valuable feature of the implemented FPAs, however, is their scalability to high resolution formats, such as 2000 x 2000, without progressively growing device complexity and cost. The overall technical objective of the proposed work was to develop uncooled infrared arrays based on micromechanical sensors. Currently used miniature sensors use a number of different readout techniques to accomplish the sensing. The use of optical readout techniques sensing require the deposition of thin coatings on the surface of micromechanical thermal detectors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is uniquely qualified to perform the required research and development (R&D) services that will assist our ongoing activities. Over the past decade ORNL has developed a number of unique methods and techniques that led to improved ...
Date: February 5, 2008
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival: Deduction of Stress Response Pathways in Metal and Radionuclide Reducing Microorganisms

Description: The projects application goals are to: (1) To understand bacterial stress-response to the unique stressors in metal/radionuclide contamination sites; (2) To turn this understanding into a quantitative, data-driven model for exploring policies for natural and biostimulatory bioremediation; (3) To implement proposed policies in the field and compare results to model predictions; and (4) Close the experimental/computation cycle by using discrepancies between models and predictions to drive new measurements and construction of new models. The projects science goals are to: (1) Compare physiological and molecular response of three target microorganisms to environmental perturbation; (2) Deduce the underlying regulatory pathways that control these responses through analysis of phenotype, functional genomic, and molecular interaction data; (3) Use differences in the cellular responses among the target organisms to understand niche specific adaptations of the stress and metal reduction pathways; (4) From this analysis derive an understanding of the mechanisms of pathway evolution in the environment; and (5) Ultimately, derive dynamical models for the control of these pathways to predict how natural stimulation can optimize growth and metal reduction efficiency at field sites.
Date: April 17, 2004
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Opportunities in the Fusion Energy Sciences Program [Includes Appendix C: Topical Areas Characterization]

Description: Recent years have brought dramatic advances in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas and in the generation of fusion power in the laboratory. Today, there is little doubt that fusion energy production is feasible. The challenge is to make fusion energy practical. As a result of the advances of the last few years, there are now exciting opportunities to optimize fusion systems so that an attractive new energy source will be available when it may be needed in the middle of the next century. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are among the reasons to pursue these opportunities.
Date: June 1, 1999
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biomedical engineering research at DOE national labs

Description: Biomedical Engineering is the application of principles of physics, chemistry, nd engineering to problems of human health. The National Laboratories of the U.S. Department of Energy have been leaders in this scientific field since 1947. This inventory of their biomedical engineering projects was compiled in January 1999.
Date: March 1, 1999
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department