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1995 Site environmental report, January 1995--December 1995

Description: This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations in calendar year 1995 (CY95) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national laboratory operated by Stanford University under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is devoted to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics, in basic sciences using synchrotron radiation, and in accelerator physics and technology. SLAC`s Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Division consists of five departments and a Program Planning Office (PPO). Their shared goal is to help ensure that SLAC operates in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations, as well as DOE Orders related to environment, safety, and health. The five departments are: (1) Environmental Protection and Restoration (EPR), (2) Operational Health Physics (OHP), (3) Radiation Physics (RP), (4) Safety, Health, and Assurance (SHA), and (5) Waste Management (WM). The EPR Department oversees the majority of SLAC`s environmental programs, including programs for environmental restoration; waste minimization; air quality; storm water and industrial wastewater; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); and groundwater. The WM Department coordinates disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste. The OHP Department, in cooperation with the EPR Department, oversees environmental radiological monitoring and dosimetry at SLAC. The SHA Department oversees quality assurance for SLAC`s environmental activities. The RP Department conducts beam checkouts of new experiments to ensure shielding adequacy for the protection of the workers and members of the general public. The most significant information in this report is summarized briefly in the following sections.
Date: September 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

Description: Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.
Date: April 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Final report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1995

Description: The aim of this program has been to improve the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) to achieve high resolution with high sensitivity. Towards this aim, the authors have carried out the following studies: (1) explored new techniques for detection of annihilation radiation including new detector materials and system geometries, specific areas that they have studied include--exploration of factors related to resolution and sensitivity of PET instrumentation including geometry, detection materials and coding, and the exploration of technique to improve the image quality by use of depth of interaction and increased sampling; (2) complete much of the final testing of PCR-II, an analog-coded cylindrical positron tomograph, developed and constructed during the current funding period; (3) developed the design of a positron microtomograph with mm resolution for quantitative studies in small animals, a single slice version of this device has been designed and studied by use of computer simulation; (4) continued and expanded the program of biological studies in animal models. Current studies have included imaging of animal models of Parkinson`s and Huntington`s disease and cancer. These studies have included new radiopharmaceuticals and techniques involving molecular biology.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron interactions with biological tissue. Final report

Description: This program was aimed at creating a quantitative physical description, at the micrometer and nanometer levels, of the physical interactions of neutrons with tissue through the ejected secondary charged particles. The authors used theoretical calculations whose input includes neutron cross section data; range, stopping power, ion yield, and straggling information; and geometrical properties. Outputs are initial and slowing-down spectra of charged particles, kerma factors, average values of quality factors, microdosimetric spectra, and integral microdosimetric parameters such as {bar y}{sub F}, {bar y}{sub D}, y{sup *}. Since it has become apparent that nanometer site sizes are also relevant to radiobiological effects, the calculations of event size spectra and their parameters were extended to these smaller diameters. This information is basic to radiological physics, radiation biology, radiation protection of workers, and standards for neutron dose measurement.
Date: February 17, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory directed research and development: Annual report to the Department of Energy

Description: As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, Brookhaven must continuously foster the development of new ideas and technologies, promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develop new fundable R and D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments are described in this report. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.
Date: December 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fusion technology development annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

Description: In FY96, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the magnetic fusion program. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Design Studies (Section 2), Plasma Interactive Materials (Section 3), SiC/SiC Composite Material Development (Section 4), Magnetic Diagnostic Probes (Section 5) and RF Technology (Section 6). Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA`s fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to ITER and other next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, the authors carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. They continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry.
Date: March 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

Description: This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.
Date: May 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

E-SMART system for in-situ detection of environmental contaminants. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1997

Description: General Atomics (GA) leads a team of industrial, academic, and government organizations in the development of the Environmental Systems Management, Analysis and Reporting neTwork (E-SMART) for the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), by way of this Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP). E-SMART defines a standard by which networks of smart sensing, sampling, and control devices can interoperate. E-SMART{reg_sign} is intended to be an open standard, available to any equipment manufacturer. The user will be provided a standard platform on which a site-specific monitoring plan can be implemented using sensors and actuators from various manufacturers and upgraded as new monitoring devices become commercially available. This project will further develop and advance the E-SMART standardized network protocol to include new sensors, sampling systems, and graphical user interfaces.
Date: December 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

Description: We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.
Date: December 31, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Synthesis and characterization of novel associating water-soluble copolymers]: Annual progress report, November 15, 1993-November 15, 1994

Description: A large number of hydrophobically associating copolymers of N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) or N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMA) with perfluoroalkyl acrylates (FOSA) containing between .01 and 1.0 mole % FOSA (with respect to DMA) were synthesized by emulsion and by bulk copolymerization. In contrast with the acrylamide (AM) FOSA copolymers the corresponding NVP and DMA copolymers are soluble in THF and CH{sub 3}OH in addition to water. This is expected to be of help in the characterization. This report discusses the synthesis, the kinetics of AM-FOSA copolymerization, and characterization.
Date: December 31, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recommendations for a Department of Energy nuclear energy R and D agenda

Description: On January 14, 1997, the President requested that his Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) make ``recommendations ... by October 1, 1997 on how to ensure that the United States has a program that addresses its energy and environmental needs for the next century.`` In its report, Federal Energy Research and Development for the Challenges of the Twenty-First Century, the PCAST Panel stated that ``the United States faces major energy-related challenges as it enters the twenty-first century`` and links these challenges to national economic and environmental well-being as well as to national security. The Panel concluded that ``Fission belongs in the R and D portfolio.`` In conjunction with this activity, the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, together with seven of the national laboratories, undertook a study to recommend nuclear energy R and D responses to the challenges and recommendations identified by the PCAST Panel. This seven-laboratory study included an analysis of past and present nuclear energy policies, current R and D activities, key issues, and alternative scenarios for domestic and global nuclear energy R and D programs and policies. The results are summarized. Nuclear power makes important contributions to the nation`s well-being that can be neither ignored nor easily replaced without significant environmental and economic costs, particularly in an energy future dominated by global energy growth but marked by significant uncertainties and potential instabilities. Future reliance on these contributions requires continuing past progress on the issues confronting nuclear power today: safety, waste management, proliferation, and economics. A strong nuclear energy agenda will enable the U.S. government to meet its three primary energy responsibilities: (1) respond to current needs; (2) prepare the country for anticipated future developments; and (3) safeguard the country from unexpected future events.
Date: December 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

E-SMART system for in-situ detection of environmental contaminants. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1997

Description: General Atomics (GA) leads a team of industrial, academic, and government organizations in the development of the Environmental Systems Management, Analysis and Reporting neTwork (E-SMART) for the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), by way of this Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP). E-SMART defines a standard by which networks of smart sensing, sampling, and control devices can interoperate. E-SMART is intended to be an open standard, available to any equipment manufacturer. The user will be provided a standard platform on which a site-specific monitoring plan can be implemented using sensors and actuators from various manufacturers and upgraded as new monitoring devices become commercially available. This project will further develop and advance the E-SMART standardized network protocol to include new sensors, sampling systems, and graphical user interfaces.
Date: August 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the workshop on nonlinear MHD and extended MHD

Description: Nonlinear MHD simulations have proven their value in interpreting experimental results over the years. As magnetic fusion experiments reach higher performance regimes, more sophisticated experimental diagnostics coupled with ever expanding computer capabilities have increased both the need for and the feasibility of nonlinear global simulations using models more realistic than regular ideal and resistive MHD. Such extended-MHD nonlinear simulations have already begun to produce useful results. These studies are expected to lead to ever more comprehensive simulation models in the future and to play a vital role in fully understanding fusion plasmas. Topics include the following: (1) current state of nonlinear MHD and extended-MHD simulations; (2) comparisons to experimental data; (3) discussions between experimentalists and theorists; (4) /equations for extended-MHD models, kinetic-based closures; and (5) paths toward more comprehensive simulation models, etc. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.
Date: December 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron diffraction: Determining stresses in materials

Description: This paper briefly describes the use of Argonne`s Intense Pulsed Neutron Source to interrogate composite materials. Such materials make up ceramic engine parts, nuclear reactor components, advanced jet engines, etc., and IPNS can be used to make predictions about material quality and life expectancy. The neutron diffraction measures internal residual stresses.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

E-SMART system for in-situ detection of environmental contaminants. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1997

Description: General Atomics (GA) leads a team of industrial, academic, and government organizations in the development of the Environmental Systems Management, Analysis and Reporting neTwork (E-SMART) for the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), by way of this Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP). E-SMART defines a standard by which networks of smart sensing, sampling, and control devices can interoperate. E-SMART{reg_sign} is intended to be an open standard, available to any equipment manufacturer. The user will be provided a standard platform on which a site-specific monitoring plan can be implemented using sensors and actuators from various manufacturers and upgraded as new monitoring devices become commercially available. This project will further develop and advance the E-SMART standardized network protocol to include new sensors, sampling systems, and graphical user interfaces.
Date: March 30, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Workshop: Research and development plans for high power spallation neutron testing at BNL

Description: This report consists of vugraphs from presentations at the meeting. The papers covered the following topics: (1) APS as a proton source; (2) target status for NSNS (National Spallation Neutron Source); (3) spallation neutron source in Japan; (4) liquid LiBi flow loop; and (5) research and development plans for high power tests at the AGS.
Date: August 5, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CEBAF - environmental protection program plan

Description: An important objective in the successful operation of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is to ensure protection of the public and the environment. To meet this objective, the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., (SURA) is committed to working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop, implement, and manage a sound and workable environmental protection program at CEBAF. This environmental protection plan includes information on environmental monitoring, long-range monitoring, groundwater protection, waste minimization, and pollution prevention awareness program plan.
Date: October 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of poling processor, charge trapping and preservation - some ferroelectric and polymeric material. Final report, July 1, 1984--June 20, 1990

Description: A single crystalline (Yttrium stabilized) Zirconia was extensively studied in order to get insight into the charge transport process in Zirconia as compared to other crystalline samples. One thing examined was the effect of crystalline-orientation charge retention on the electret formation discs. The authors did not find any significant difference in the electret formation or retention on cutting the crystal in different orientations. They did, however, notice and collect data on the increase of the charge density and the half life when the sample thickness was increased. They are trying to correlate this with their theory developed for the charge retention and relaxation for the two different mechanisms of monocharge and bipolar charge retention. They also examined the increase in the relaxation time by storage at colder temperature and drier atmosphere. The result was an exponential increase of the half life with the fall of temperature as expected. They began investigating different new materials, all obtained from single crystalline structure. Some new materials like deuterated triglycine fluoroberyliate, (TGA) etc., were found to have much lower insulation property to be able to retain the charges. On the other hand the single crystalline samples of Lithium Niobate and lead zirconium titanate were found to be much better than the single crystal-zironia.
Date: September 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STI. DE-FG02-00ER1505 [Brief summary of 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research]

Description: The 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held in Madison, Wisconsin, June 24 through June 28, 2000. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of genetic study for many years. However, during the last decade, the number of research laboratories using Arabidopsis as a model system has increased tremendously, and Arabidopsis is currently being used to study all aspects of plant biology. The rapid rate of progress in Arabidopsis research, including the completion of the genomic sequence, underscores the usefulness of holding a meeting every year. These conferences provide an important opportunity for the Arabidopsis community to interact and exchange information. The meeting opened with an evening keynote address on the global impact of plant biology, delivered by Richard Jefferson, the Executive Director of CAMBIA (Center for the Application of Molecular Biology to International Agriculture). This was followed by short updates from each of the NSF-funded Plant Genome groups. Many of these groups are carrying out projects that impact the Arabidopsis community. Each of the 17 platform sessions consisted of talks from two invited speakers followed by two short talks that were chosen from the submitted poster abstracts. A concerted effort was made to invite junior investigators, including graduate students and postdocs, to give these talks. Posters were available for viewing during three formal sessions, and, because the poster session was adjacent to the lecture hall, it was easy for participants to go back and forth between posters and lectures. Finally, a mixer and an informal banquet provided opportunities for participants to meet new people and renew acquaintances. Furthermore, the registration package included all lunches and dinners together in a cafeteria next to the posters and lecture hall, thus encouraging the meeting of established investigators with students and postdocs. The North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (elected by electronic ballot by ...
Date: June 24, 2000
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report

Description: The SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing attracted 164 domestic and international researchers, from academia, industry, and government. It provided a stimulating forum in which to learn about the latest developments, to discuss exciting new research directions, and to forge stronger ties between theory and applications. Final Report
Date: March 11, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

Description: This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.
Date: January 3, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Final Report

Description: An assessment of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) program with guidance for future program strategy. The overall objective of this study is to prepare an independent assessment of the scientific quality of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program at the Department of Energy. The Fusion Science Assessment Committee (FuSAC) has been appointed to conduct this study.
Date: May 1, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plant cell wall architecture. Final technical report for DOE award no. DE-FG02-97ER20258

Description: The goals of the project were to investigate the roles of caffeoyl coenzyme A O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT), an enzyme involved in the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, in the biosynthesis of lignin. The investigators proposed to analyze the expression pattern of CCoAOMT in plants, and examine how reduction in the expression of CCoAOMT would affect lignin content and composition. The goals were fulfilled, and significant findings on lignin biochemistry were made. Two papers were published, and one patent application based on the findings was filed.
Date: August 6, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Institute for Global Environmental Change, July 1, 1994-- June 30, 1995

Description: This document contains the report from the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the period July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995. Separate sections for the Great Plains, Midwestern, Norhteast, South Central, Southeast and Western regions are present. Each section contains project descriptions and abstracts for projects managed by the respective regional offices.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department