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The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It

Description: "Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Luginbill, Philip
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Insects Injurious to Deciduous Shade Trees and Their Control

Description: "Practical ways of controlling most of the injurious shade-tree insects are known. This bulletin discusses the more important insects affecting deciduous shade trees in the western two-thirds of the United States with the exception of the gispy moth and the brown-tail moth and gives the remedies for them." -- p. 2. Methods discussed include spraying with insecticides, pruning, tree banding, and fertilizers.
Date: 1921
Creator: Kotinsky, Jacob
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Insects injurious to the rice crop.

Description: Describes several different pests which attack rice crops in the United States, including: stinkbugs, water weevils, borers, and several other minor pests; also describes the methods of controlling these pests.
Date: December 1927
Creator: Ingram, J. W. (Jesse Wilburn), b. 1900.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Harlequin Cabbage Bug and Its Control

Description: Report discussing the harlequin cabbage bug, which destroys cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, turnip, and radish crops. Discussion includes the insect's distribution, life cycle, and methods of controlling it.
Date: 1920
Creator: Chittenden, F. H. (Frank Hurlbut), 1858-1929
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Asparagus Beetles and Their Control

Description: "Asparagus growers in large sections of the United States now have to protect their crop against the attacks of the adults and young of two species of beetles introduced originally from Europe. These insects feed on the young and tender asparagus shoots and render them worthless for the market. Later broods devour the foliage and frequently kill the plants. This bulletin gives brief descriptions of the various stages of these pests, tells how they live and work, and gives suggestions for controlling them. Of remedial measures the best for general use is shown to be spraying with arsenate of lead directions for the preparation and application of which are given on pages 10-11." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Chittenden, F. H. (Frank Hurlbut), 1858-1929
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Important Pecan Insects and Their Control

Description: "The pecan has a number of important insect enemies of more or less extended distribution. Some of these injure the nuts, others the foliage and shoots, and still others the trunk and branches. Owing to the wide diversity in their methods of attack, no general directions for the control of these pests can be given, and in the adoption of remedial measures the peculiar habits of each species must be considered. This bulletin describes the more important insects that injure pecans and suggests the methods that should be followed to avert damage." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Gill, John B. (John Buchanan)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Boll-Weevil Problem, with Special Reference to Means of Reducing Damage

Description: "This bulletin contains a general account of the boll-weevil problem. It deals with the history of the insect in the United States, the damage it has done in different regions, and the reasons for local variations in damage, the indications for the future, the habits of the weevil in so far as they are connected with control measures, and the means of reducing the injury it causes by methods which have been tested in many experimental fields and by large numbers of practical planters." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Hunter, W. D. (Walter David), 1875-1925
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cranberry Insect Problems and Suggestions for Solving Them

Description: "The cranberry has many insect enemies, but some of them are of importance only on dry bogs. The foliage is attacked by three species of "fireworms," the tipworm, spanworms, army worms, and the cranberry fleabeetle; the fruit is eaten by the fruitworm , blossom worm, cranberry katydid, and grasshoppers; the vine is attacked by the girdler, toadbug, vinehopper, spittle insect, mealybug, and Putnam and oyster-shell scales; and the roots are destroyed by the rootworm and white grubs. This bulletin gives brief descriptions of these pests, their life histories, and the means found most effective, in each case, in preventing their ravages and destroying them." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Scammell, H. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Common Mealybugs and Its Control in California

Description: "No one method for the control of the common mealybug can be recommended under all conditions. The remedy or remedies to be used will depend upon whether the trees are in house lots or orchards, whether few or many, and the infestation light or severe. In the case of severe infestation it will depend also upon the kind of fruit. This insect infests oranges of all varieties, grapefruit, lemons, and all other kinds of citrus fruit grown in California, causing deformity, weakening and dropping of much immature fruit, and the discoloration and weakening of the rind of the fruit maturing. This bulletin discusses the three remedies which have been widely used; namely, fumigation, spraying, and the artificial spread of insect enemies, points out the sphere of usefulness of each method, and shows, on pages 14-15, how they may be combined so as to secure complete control." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Woglum, R. S. (Russell Sage) & Neuls, J. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spraying for the Control of Insects and Mites Attacking Citrus Trees in Florida

Description: "Under Florida conditions spraying is the most effective method for the control of citrus pests. In the past there have been many failures, and much money has been expended without adequate returns to the grower in better fruit and increased yields. These failures have been due to various causes, such as improper equipment, ineffective insecticides, and a lack of a proper spraying schedule. This bulletin gives information regarding the best equipment for Florida conditions, and directions for preparing effective homemade insecticides. There is also given a spraying schedule that has proved satisfactory after several years of practical experience and such other information as will enable the grower to control citrus pests in a satisfactory manner. Spraying improves the grades of the fruit and increases the yield of the trees out of all proportion to its cost, if the work is done properly." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Yothers, W. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Control of the Green Clover Worm in Alfalfa Fields

Description: "Severe infestation of alfalfa by the green clover worm has been reported recently from the central part of the United States. Caterpillars, hatching out from eggs laid by small brown and black moths, in some cases have stripped the foliage from alfalfa plants to such an extent that infested fields have been made to appear ragged. The green clover worm is generally distributed over the eastern half of the country. Timely cutting of the crop so as to remove their food supply when the caterpillars are most abundant, with clean culture, is the best control measure. It may be supplemented by the use of the hopper-dozer when outbreaks are particularly bad." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Hill, Charles C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bean and Pea Weevils

Description: "This bulletin tells about the principal kinds of bean and pea weevils and explains fully the methods of averting losses from these pests."
Date: 1918
Creator: Back, E. A. & Duckett, A. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tobacco Hornworm Insecticide: Recommendations for Use of Powdered Arsenate of Lead in Dark-Tobacco District

Description: "From the time when tobacco was first cultivated in the dark-tobacco regions of Tennessee and Kentucky it has been necessary to combat the hornworms in order to produce profitable crops. For many years the practice of removing them from the plants by hand was followed. Later Paris green came into general use. This bulletin deals with the use of powdered arsenate of lead, which has been found to be preferable to Paris green in many respects. Full directions for its use under varying conditions are given." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Morgan, A. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Bollworm or Corn Earworm

Description: "Cotton bollworm, corn earworm, tomato fruitworm, and false budworm of tobacco are common names applied to one and the same insect when it is found attacking these various crops. In fact the insect is a very general feeder, attacking many wild plants as well as garden vegetables, alfalfa, cowpeas, and the crops indicated above. The bollworm, or corn earworm as it is most widely known, occurs as a pest in practically all parts of the United States." -- p. 3. This bulletin discusses the life cycle of the insect, its distribution, and measures for its control.
Date: 1917
Creator: Bishopp, F. C. (Fred Corry), 1884-1970
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How Insects Affect the Cotton Plant and Means of Combating Them

Description: "The cotton plant is unusually attractive to insects and probably no other cultivated crop has as large a list of insect enemies. Among these are some of the most destructive pests in the history of agriculture. Many cotton pests come to the cotton from other crops or from weeds around the fields. Weeds should not be allowed to grow. Rotation of crops is of assistance in controlling cotton pests. Poisons seldom are needed, except in poisoned baits in the spring and against red spiders, grasshoppers, and 'worms' when they threaten the crop. Thorough fall plowing, winter cover crops, early spring preparation, and repeated cultivation during the season are important measures of insect control. The cotton plants should be turned under in the fall. This bulletin describes the work of many insects and gives suggestions for their control." -- p. 2. Among the insects discussed are ants, cutworms, may beetles, aphids, grassworms, grasshoppers, bollworms, wireworms, and crickets.
Date: 1917
Creator: Pierce, W. Dwight (William Dwight), 1881-1967
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fleas and Their Control

Description: "Of the approximately 500 species of fleas known to exist, less than one dozen are of special interest as pests to many and domestic animals, but any individual of one of these few species, when bent upon satisfying its appetite, fully occupies the attention of its chosen host. The human flea, dog flea, cat flea, sticktight flea or chicken flea, and the rat fleas (which carry the bubonic plague), are the principal species that annoy man and domestic animals in the United States. The main steps in control, as described in this bulletin, are the elimination of breeding places and the destruction of fleas on the infested animals. If breeding places receive proper attention the premises often will be cleared of fleas, even though little or no attention is given to the animals themselves." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Bishopp, F. C. (Fred Corry), 1884-1970
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department