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Instructor qualification for radiation safety training at a national laboratory

Description: Prior to 1993, Health Physics Training (HPT) was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) health physics group. The job requirements specified a Masters Degree and experience. In fact, the majority of Health Physicists in the group were certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Under those circumstances, it was assumed that individuals in the group were technically qualified and the HPT instructor qualification stated that. In late 1993, the Health Physics Group at the LLNL was restructured and the training function was assigned to the training group. Additional requirements for training were mandated by the Department of Energy (DOE), which would necessitate increasing the existing training staff. With the need to hire, and the policy of reassignment of employees during downsizing, it was imperative that formal qualification standards be developed for technical knowledge. Qualification standards were in place for instructional capability. In drafting the new training qualifications for instructors, the requirements of a Certified Health Physicists had to be modified due to supply and demand. Additionally, for many of the performance-based training courses, registration by the National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists is more desirable. Flexibility in qualification requirements has been incorporated to meet the reality of ongoing training and the compensation for desirable skills of individuals who may not meet all the criteria. The qualification requirements for an instructor rely on entry-level requirements and emphasis on goals (preferred) and continuing development of technical and instructional capabilities.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Trinoskey, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

US Department of Energy standardized radiation safety training

Description: The following working groups were formed under the direction of a radiological training coordinator: managers, supervisors, DOE auditors, ALARA engineers/schedulers/planners, radiological control personnel, radiation-generating device operators, emergency responders, visitors, Pu facilities, U facilities, tritium facilities, accelerator facilities, biomedical researchers. General courses for these groups are available, now or soon, in the form of handbooks.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Trinoskey, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A new standard for core training in radiation safety

Description: A new American National Standard for radiation worker training was recently developed. The standard emphasizes performance-based training and establishing a training program rather than simply prescribing objectives. The standard also addresses basic criteria, including instructor qualifications. The standard is based on input from a wide array of regulatory agencies, universities, national laboratories, and nuclear power entities. This paper presents an overview of the new standard and the philosophy behind it. The target audience includes radiation workers, management and supervisory personnel, contractors, students, emergency personnel, and visitors.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Trinoskey, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation safety training for accelerator facilities

Description: In November 1992, a working group was formed within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) accelerator facilities to develop a generic safety training program to meet the basic requirements for individuals working in accelerator facilities. This training, by necessity, includes sections for inserting facility-specific information. The resulting course materials were issued by DOE as a handbook under its technical standards in 1996. Because experimenters may be at a facility for only a short time and often at odd times during the day, the working group felt that computer-based training would be useful. To that end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) together have developed a computer-based safety training program for accelerator facilities. This interactive course not only enables trainees to receive facility- specific information, but time the training to their schedule and tailor it to their level of expertise.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Trinoskey, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contamination control training for biomedical facilities

Description: In 1991, a contamination control course was developed for the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program (BBRP) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This course was based on the developer`s experience in Radiation Safety at the University of Utah and University of Kansas Medical Center. This course has been well received at LLNL because it addresses issues that are important to individuals handling small quantities of radioactive materials. This group of users is often overlooked. They are typically very well educated and are expected to ``know`` what they should do. Many of these individuals are not initially comfortable working with radioactive materials. They appreciate the opportunity to be introduced to contamination control techniques and to discuss issues they may have. In addition, the authors benefit by experience that researchers bring from other facilities. The training course will address the specific radiological training requirements for chemists, biologists, and medical researchers who are using small amounts of dispersible radionuclides in tabletop experiments, and will not be exposed to other radiation sources. The training will include: the potential hazards of typical radionuclides, contamination control procedures, and guidance for developing and including site-specific information. The training course will eliminate the need for Radiological Worker II training for bio-medical researchers. The target audience for this training course is bio-medical researchers.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Trinoskey, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Training and qualification of health and safety technicians at a national laboratory

Description: Over the last 30 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has successfully implemented the concept of a multi-disciplined technician. LLNL Health and Safety Technicians have responsibilities in industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, as well as fire, explosive, and criticality safety. One of the major benefits to this approach is the cost-effective use of workers who display an ownership of health and safety issues which is sometimes lacking when responsibilities are divided. Although LLNL has always promoted the concept of a multi-discipline technician, this concept is gaining interest within the Department of Energy (DOE) community. In November 1992, individuals from Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) and RUST Geotech, joined by LLNL established a committee to address the issues of Health and Safety Technicians. In 1993, the DOE Office of Environmental, Safety and Health, in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 91-6, stated DOE projects, particularly environmental restoration, typically present hazards other than radiation such as chemicals, explosives, complex construction activities, etc., which require additional expertise by Radiological Control Technicians. They followed with a commitment that a training guide would be issued. The trend in the last two decades has been toward greater specialization in the areas of health and safety. In contrast, the LLNL has moved toward a generalist approach integrating the once separate functions of the industrial hygiene and health physics technician into one function.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Egbert, W.F. & Trinoskey, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Standard for Multidisciplinary Health and Safety Technicians

Description: The purpose of this standard (ANSI 13.62)--''Training and Qualification of Health and Safety Technicians''--is to provide a means for the development of technicians with necessary skills in industrial hygiene, industrial safety, radiological safety, fire protection, and other health and safety areas specific to a given work site and its hazards. These individuals should be qualified to handle their roles and responsibilities competently in a variety of safety areas. The standard presented here is intended for individuals who develop, revise, implement, manage, or provide oversight of training for health and safety technicians. The standard is not intended to address the training or qualification of safety professionals (i.e., industrial hygienists and health physicists).
Date: January 18, 2000
Creator: Trinoskey, P.A.; Fry, L. & Egbert, W.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

Description: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a contamination-control program developed by LLNL. A comprehensive study guide and a post-training practical exam supplement the ...
Date: January 18, 2000
Creator: Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I. & Wells, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department