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Rhodes Grass

Description: "Rhodes grass was introduced from southern Africa in 1902, and has proved of value for cultivation in the warmer parts of the United States, being grown more largely in Florida and Texas than elsewhere.... It makes a heavy yield of hay of excellent quality, as the stems are slender, tender, and very leafy. The hay is cured easily and is relished by all kinds of live stock.... This bulletin mentions the soil preferences of this grass and gives the methods of seeding and after-treatment employed as well as handling the hay and pasturing and seed saving." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rhodes Grass

Description: Revised edition. "Rhodes grass was introduced from southern Africa in 1902, and has proved of value for cultivation in the warmer parts of the United States, being grown more largely in Florida and Texas than elsewhere.... It makes a heavy yield of hay of excellent quality, as the stems are slender, tender, and very leafy. The hay is cured easily and is relished by all kinds of live stock.... This bulletin mentions the soil preferences of this grass and gives the methods of seeding and after-treatment employed as well as handling the hay and pasturing and seed saving." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Forage Crops for the Cotton Region

Description: Report discussing the grasses, legumes, hay crops, pasture crops, and other forage crops which grow in the Gulf Coast region of the United States. Among the more profitable crops discussed are velvet bean, beggarweed, Mexican clover, Japan clover, and Bermuda grass.
Date: 1912
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corn Culture in the South

Description: Report discussing and promoting the cultivation of corn in the southern United States. "The purpose of the article is to encourage the more extensive growing of corn in those portions of the South where its culture has hitherto been more or less neglected." -- p. 2.
Date: 1898
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bermuda Grass

Description: Bermuda grass is the most important perennial grass in the Southern States. It was introduced into the United States at least as early as 1806. Besides the common Bermuda grass, there are several varieties, the most important of which are the Giant, characterized by a very large growth, and St. Lucie grass, similar to ordinary Bermuda grass, but lacking underground rootstocks. Bermuda grass grows well mixed with lespedeza for a summer crop. Bur clover, black medic, and hairy vetch as winter crops alternate well with it. The best Bermuda-grass pastures of the South will usually carry two head of cattle per acre for eight months of the year. On poor soils the carrying capacity is not more than one cow per acre. On rich bottom land Bermuda grass grows tall enough to cut for hay. Under exceptional circumstances three or more cuttings may be secured in a season, giving total yields of from 6 to 10 tons of hay per acre. It will grow well on soils so alkaline that most other field crops, as well as fruits, will fail. The feeding value of Bermuda-grass hay compares closely wit that of timothy hay. Bermuda grass frequently is used to bind leaves and toe prevent hillsides from washing. The grass usually can be eradicated by growing two smother crops, a winter one of oats or rye, followed by a summer crop of cow peas or velvet beans." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natal Grass: A Southern Perennial Hay Crop

Description: This report discusses natal grass, a South African plant used for hay which is commonly grown in the southern United States and particularly in Florida. Its climatic and soil requirements, seeds, and varieties are among the topics discussed.
Date: 1916
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dairying in the South.

Description: A guide to dairy farming for new farmers in the South, for the purpose of improving the quality of their products.
Date: 1905
Creator: United States. Department of Agriculture.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Velvet Beans

Description: This bulletin describes the velvet bean, which is a legume useful in the southern United States for feeds and fertilizers. Topics discussed include varieties, planting practices, hay, feed production, and insect enemies.
Date: 1918
Creator: Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920 & Coe, H. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department