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Quench observation using quench antennas on RHIC IR quadrupole magnets

Description: Quench observation using quench antennas is now being performed routinely on RHIC dipole and quadrupole magnets. Recently, a quench antenna was used on a RHIC IR magnet which is heavily instrumented with voltage taps. It was confirmed that the signals detected in the antenna coils do not contradict the voltage tap signals. The antenna also detects a sign of mechanical disturbance which could be related to a training quench. This paper summarizes signals detected in the antenna and discusses possible causes of these signals.
Date: July 1995
Creator: Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ganetis, G.; Muratore, J. & Wanderer, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quench antennas for RHIC quadrupole magnets

Description: Quench antennas for RHIC quadrupole magnets are being developed jointly by KEK and BNL. A quench antenna is a device to localize a quench origin using arrays of pick-up coils lined up along the magnet bore. Each array contains four pick-up coils: sensitive to normal sextupole, skew sextupole, normal octupole, and skew octupole field. This array configuration allows an azimuthal localization of a quench front while a series of arrays gives an axial localization and a quench propagation velocity. Several antennas have been developed for RHIC magnets and they are now routinely used for quench tests of production magnets. The paper discusses the description of the method and introduces a measured example using an antenna designed for quadrupole magnets.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ganetis, G.; Muratore, J. & Wanderer, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design, fabrication, and test of a 5-cm aperture, 1-m long superconducting dipole prototype for high energy hadron collider

Description: A 1-m long superconducting dipole prototype with an aperture of 5 cm and a rated field of 6.6 T was built and tested. This model was based on a two-layer cosine-theta coil clamped by stainless steel collars inside a laminated iron yoke, with a large keystone-angle cable and no wedge. The cold mass was encased in an outer stainless steel skin. The magnet was instrumented with voltage taps, which allow the location of the quench start, and with strain gauges, which allow the measurement of the coil stress variations during assembly, cool-down, and energization. Prior to the assembly, several tests were carried out in order to understand the mechanical properties of the coil and to determine a proper calibration for the strain gauges. This paper reports these design studies, with emphasis on the calibration problem, followed by a discussion of the magnet assembly and quench performance in light of the mechanical measurements.
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: Shintomi, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Maehata, K.; Wake, M.; Hirabayashi, H. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of the Production of Radioactive Isotopes through Cosmic Muon Spallation in KamLAND

Description: Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare event detection in {nu} detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillator, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and Geant4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be (2.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -4} n/({mu} {center_dot} (g/cm{sup 2})). For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.
Date: June 30, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, KamLAND; Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department