27 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

Description: With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.
Date: May 1, 2006
Creator: Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the United States: Locations and Local Impacts (Presentation)

Description: Suzanne Tegen's presentation about U.S. wind energy manufacturing (presented at WINDPOWER 2010 in Dallas) provides information about challenges to modeling renewables; wind energy's economic "ripple effect"; case studies about wind-related manufacturing in Colorado, Iowa, Ohio, and Indiana; manufacturing maps for the Great Lakes region, Arkansas, and the United States; sample job announcements; and U.S. Treasury Grant 1603 funding.
Date: May 26, 2010
Creator: Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Skills Assessment of the U.S. Wind Industry in 2012

Description: A robust workforce is essential to developing domestic wind power projects, including manufacturing, siting, operations, maintenance, and research capabilities. The purpose of our research is to better understand today's domestic wind workforce, projected workforce needs as the industry grows, and how existing and new programs can meet the wind industry's future education and training needs. Results presented in this report provide the first published investigation into the detailed makeup of the wind energy workforce, educational infrastructure and training needs of the wind industry. Insights from this research into the domestic wind workforce will allow the private sector, educational institutions, and federal and state governmental organizations to make workforce-related decisions based on the current employment and training data and future projections in this report.
Date: June 1, 2013
Creator: Levanthal, M. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming

Description: This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.
Date: March 1, 2011
Creator: Lantz, E. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Indiana

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Indiana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Indiana to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,684 million gallons.
Date: May 1, 2008
Creator: Lantz, E. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint

Description: This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Tegen, S.; Milligan, M. & Goldberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Massachusetts. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Massachusetts to be $1.4 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,293 million gallons.
Date: March 1, 2009
Creator: Lantz, E. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Tennessee (Fact Sheet)

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Tennessee. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Tennessee to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,321 million gallons.
Date: March 1, 2009
Creator: Lantz, E. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint

Description: 'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.
Date: April 1, 2009
Creator: Lantz, E. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint

Description: In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.
Date: June 1, 2006
Creator: Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M. & Milligan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)

Description: This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.
Date: June 1, 2012
Creator: Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL Response to the Report 'Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources' from King Juan Carlos University (Spain) (White Paper)

Description: Job generation has been a part of the national dialogue surrounding energy policy and renewable energy (RE) for many years. RE advocates tout the ability of renewable energy to support new job opportunities in rural America and the manufacturing sector. Others argue that spending on renewable energy is an inefficient allocation of resources and can result in job losses in the broader economy. The report, Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources, from King Juan Carlos University in Spain, is one recent addition to this debate. This report asserts that, on average, every renewable energy job in Spain 'destroyed' 2.2 jobs in the broader Spanish economy. The authors also apply this ratio to the U.S. context to estimate expected job loss from renewable energy development and policy in the United States. This memo discusses fundamental and technical limitations of the analysis by King Juan Carlos University and notes critical assumptions implicit in the ultimate conclusions of their work. The memo also includes a review of traditional employment impact analyses that rely on accepted, peer-reviewed methodologies, and it highlights specific variables that can significantly influence the results of traditional employment impact analysis.
Date: August 1, 2009
Creator: Lantz, E. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Social Acceptance of Wind Power in the United States: Evaluating Stakeholder Perspectives (Poster)

Description: As the wind industry strives to achieve 20% wind energy by 2030, maintaining high levels of social acceptance for wind energy will become increasingly important. Wind Powering America is currently researching stakeholder perspectives in the U.S. market and reviewing findings from wind energy projects around the world to better understand social acceptance barriers. Results from European studies show that acceptance varies widely depending on local community values. A preliminary survey shows similar results in the United States. Further research will be conducted to refine our understanding of key social acceptance barriers and evaluate the best ways to mitigate negative perspectives on wind power.
Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: Tegen, S. & Lantz, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development Impacts of 20% Wind (Poster)

Description: Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will require enourmous investment in wind farms, manufacturing, and infrastructure. This investment will create substantial economic development impacts on local, regional, and national levels. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 outlines the various economic development impacts from a 20% wind scenario.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Kelly, M. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development Impacts from Wind Power in the Western Governors' Association States (Poster)

Description: The Western Governors' Association created the Clean and Diversified Energy Advisory Committee (CDEAC) "to utilize the region's diverse resources to produce affordable, sustainable, and environmentally reponsible energy." This conference poster, prepared for WINDPOWER 2007 in Los Angeles, outlines the economic impact to the Western United States from new wind energy projects.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M. & Milligan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

Description: Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.
Date: January 1, 2014
Creator: Tegen, S. & Keyser, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impacts from Deployment Barriers on the United States Wind Power Industry: Overview & Preliminary Findings (Presentation)

Description: Regardless of cost and performance some wind projects are unable to proceed to commissioning as a result of deployment barriers. Principal deployment barriers in the industry today include: wildlife, public acceptance, access to transmission, and radar. To date, methods for understanding these non-technical barriers have failed to accurately characterize the costs imposed by deployment barriers and the degree of impact to the industry. Analytical challenges include limited data and modeling capabilities. Changes in policy and regulation, among other factors, also add complexity to analysis of impacts from deployment barriers. This presentation details preliminary results from new NREL analysis focused on quantifying the impact of deployment barriers on the wind resource of the United States, the installed cost of wind projects, and the total electric power system cost of a 20% wind energy future. In terms of impacts to wind project costs and developable land, preliminary findings suggest that deployment barriers are secondary to market drivers such as demand. Nevertheless, impacts to wind project costs are on the order of $100/kW and a substantial share of the potentially developable windy land in the United States is indeed affected by deployment barriers.
Date: September 1, 2012
Creator: Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.; Hand, M. & Heimiller, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

Description: This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.
Date: April 1, 2012
Creator: Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P. & Smith, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review

Description: This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.
Date: March 1, 2013
Creator: Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A. & Schwabe, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

Description: Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.
Date: January 1, 2014
Creator: Flores, F.; Keyser, D. & Tegen, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department