23 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Design guidance for fracture-critical components at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Description: Fracture is an important design consideration for components whose sudden and catastrophic failure could result in a serious accident. Elements of fracture control and fracture mechanics design methods are reviewed. Design requirements, which are based on the consequences of fracture of a given component, are subsequently developed. Five categories of consequences are defined. Category I is the lowest risk, and relatively lenient design requirements are employed. Category V has the highest potential for injury, release of hazardous material, and damage. Correspondingly, the design requirements for these components are the most stringent. Environmental, loading, and material factors that can affect fracture safety are also discussed.
Date: March 3, 1982
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants

Description: Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads.
Date: May 1, 1981
Creator: Goldberg, A. & Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility, monthly report, February 1995

Description: Technical progress continued in general accordance with the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) FY95 Plan. Engineering development and design continued in support of preliminary design of MWMF major subsystems. Peer reviews have begun in preparation for system preliminary design reviews. Procurements in support of engineering design/development have continued to increase. Significant effort to provide technical and cost trade-off information for the Project Baseline Revision 1.2 (PB1.2) and FY97 Validation was completed. Management focus during February centered upon addressing the rebaseline for MWMF for the FY97 Validation in March, and upon completing the permitting strategy. We completed a consistent baseline plan for Validation that satisfied the DOE constraints of integration with DWTF, schedule stretchout, overall Project cost, and FY cost profiles. The revised permitting strategy was completed and reviewed by a number of stakeholders (LLNL, DOE, State). The proposed strategy involves no RCRA RD&D permit, since all technology demonstrations can be done with surrogates and using limited treatability studies. The expenses for February continue to run somewhat below the plan due to the limited new hiring. This is a result of uncertain DOE funding and guidance to keep personnel to a minimum. However, the spending rate is picking up due to initiation of procurements for engineering development and a minimum of essential new hires. A significant imbalance in the OPEX/CENRTC funding split for FY95 exists (about $2.1M); DOE/OAK began to seek resolution this month. Critical-path items are DWTF construction, NEPA, and permitting (for both MWMF and DWTF). Contractual issues have delayed award of the A&E contract for DWTF, but work-arounds are in progress to avoid schedule impact. NEPA and permitting issues are discussed below. Progress on preliminary design for MWMF is close to schedule.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Monthly report, February 1996

Description: During February the Project activities included completion of the cost-benefit analysis for the MWMF Project, completion of the 95% Title 2 design review for the DWTF Phase 2, further development of an MWMF business plan for working with industry, and finalization of outstanding issues from the Preliminary Design Review. Based on the best available data, the results of the cost-benefit analysis lead to three simple conclusions: (1) it would be cost effective for the DOE to complete pilot-scale demonstrations of alternatives to incineration prior to design and construction of full-scale facilities; (2) given that demonstrations are to be conducted, it is more cost effective to consolidate these in the MWMF, cost-benefit from a centralized demonstration facility will more than pay for the cost of the facility over the first eight demonstrations; (3) as the cost for independent site demonstrations or the cost for deploying full-scale treatment facilities is reduced, the net benefit of demonstrations is reduced. However, under these circumstances, the risk of deploying technologies increases and the ability to promote competition among small companies, unable to compete with independent pilot-scale demonstrations, will be significantly reduced. The 95% design review of the MWMF building, DWTF Phase 2, was completed with a number of minor comments to be incorporated in the final design. Technically, the first phase of testing for the MSO (Molten Salt Oxidation) demonstrations in the engineering development unit (EDU) have been completed. A number of key engineering issues were identified and resolved including the parameters associated with the chloride content for salt recycle, baffle design, side injector, burst disk design, and material evaluations. The EDU unit will be refurbished in March for continued operations to finalize design details for the downcomer injector for solid and liquid feeds, alternate baffle design, and other engineering design issues.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, September 1995

Description: A continuing concern over the last few months was resolved with the approval of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and signing of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This was completed in time to allow approval of the DWTF Phase 1 KD-3 and subsequent award of the construction contract for this phase (site preparation). The Project continues to make progress toward the Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR), scheduled for November 15-16, 1995. We completed the conventional feed preparation and solid feed preparation demonstration technologies (telerobotic sorting) and conducted a prereview of the Analytical Services element. Molten Salt is scheduled for October 3-4, with Water Treatment and Analytical Services completing the reviews by October 12. While a number of design issues have been raised and are being tracked, the general level of engineering progress is consistent with completing the PDR on schedule. No show-stoppers have been identified, and all items requiring resolution before PDR will be competed.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report

Description: On November 15-16,1995, the Project held its formal Preliminary Design Review (PDR). The review was the culmination of the system element preliminary design reviews conducted throughout the summer and early fall. The Project level PDR brought together all of the elements of the Project for review by the Scientific Advisory Board. The committee was chaired by Booth Myers, LLNL, and included representatives from Bechtel, IT Corp., and SAIC. In addition, DOE/OAK and DOE/HQ were represented. The FY96 Plan was completed and issued (UCRL-ID-119105-95, L-20681-1). This plan focuses on completing the majority of Final Design activities by the end of FY96, with some elements carried into FY97, and on initiating a number of the long-lead procurement items. The planned expenditures for FY96 are $10.7M including expected liens and carryover into FY97. Of this budget, $9.4M is new BA and $1.4M is carryover from FY95 (including liens and approved work scope). The Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) engineering development unit tests continued to resolve engineering issues for final design. The top injector system, developed on contract by ETEC, was delivered and will be installed after the current test series are completed on the side injector concepts. The telerobotic feed preparation (TRS) engineering development also continues to make significant progress. The demonstration system was set up to mock the system configuration options in the MWMF. The system has been brought on line and the robotic system is operational. A number of tours were conducted at both of these systems as part of the PDR, and subsequently as part of the DOE/HQ visit associated with the DOE/OAK end-of-year review.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, October 1995

Description: A continuing concern over the last few months was resolved with the approval of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and signing of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This was completed in time to allow approval of the DWTF Phase 1 KD-3 and subsequent award of the construction contract for this phase (site preparation). The Project continues to make progress toward the Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR), scheduled for November 15-16, 1995. We completed the conventional feed preparation and solid feed preparation demonstration technologies (telerobotic sorting) and conducted a prereview of the Analytical Services element. Molten Salt is scheduled for October 3-4, with Water Treatment and Analytical Services completing the reviews by October 12. While a number of design issues have been raised and are being tracked, the general level of engineering progress is consistent with completing the PDR on schedule. No show-stoppers have been identified, and all items requiring resolution before PDR will be completed. We completed the initial iteration of the cost roll-ups for the preliminary design and have developed a plan consistent with the guidance issued for the Project (level funding at {approximately}$10M/yr, reduced scope, integrated with the DWTF). This was accomplished by staging the completion of various elements (e.g., MSO in FY98, Telerobotics in FY99), and reducing to the extent possible project support functions. Two significant modifications will be noted in the Project Baseline Revision 2.0-Preliminary Design (PB2.0) relative to previous estimates: (1) the cost of the MSO system has increased due to a better understanding of the system needs (relative to CDR assessment), and (2) project management has increased owing to a restructuring of how LLNL distributes facility charge costs. However, both these increases have been offset by reduction in other elements and by a general lowering of Project contingency.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mixed waste management facility

Description: During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to {approximately}$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at {approximately}$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report, March 1995

Description: This document presents details of the monthly activities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in regards to the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: quality assurance; regulations; program support; public participation; conceptual design; plant start-up; project management; feed preparation; molten salt, electrochemical, and wet oxidation; process transport and storage; and final waste forms.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report

Description: This report presents a project summary for the Mixed Waste Management facility from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for June, 1995. Key developments were the installation of the MSO Engineering Development Unit (EDU) which is on schedule for operation in July, and the first preliminary design review. This report also describes budgets and includes a milestone log of activities.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Monthly report

Description: Significant progress continued as preliminary design, technical reviews, engineering development, and procurements/contracts moved forward. Key accomplishments were installation and initial operation of the MSO Engineering Development Unit, Peer Review of Analytical Services, development of Preliminary design Baseline guidance, and formal acceptance of the environmental assessment. Budget information on WBS elements are given.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report August 1995

Description: The project is concerned with the design of a mixed waste facility to prepare solid and liquid wastes for processing by electrochemical oxidation, molten salt oxidation, wet oxidation, or UV photolysis. The facility will have a receiving and shipping unit, preparation and processing units, off-gas scrubbing, analytical services, water treatment, and transport and storage facilities. This monthly report give task summaries for 25 tasks which are part of the overall design effort.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report, April 1995

Description: During late April, we modified the budget and work plan for FY95 to reflect a $2000K funding reduction for this fiscal year. These changes incorporate both the delayed start and slow ramp-up due to DOE funding uncertainties, as well as new and real reductions in Project activities. Due to the significant budgeting impact, this report reflects the resulting budget changes (for April). Scope and schedule impact, however, will be documented in the May report due to the additional effort involved in assessing schedule impact. We will combine the May Monthly Report and the Revised FY95 Plan for cost efficiency; we will submit the FY95 Plan Rebaseline for approval by DOE in May. Technical progress continued during April, but was redirected toward the new FY95 Plan. Key changes in the revised plan are to delete MEO from Project scope and wrap up work to date, defer further major procurements for the Project from FY95, delete MSO staff additions (with milestones), and defer work and milestones in other WBS elements. Engineering development, preliminary design, and peer reviews continued in preparation for the Project Preliminary Design Review. The budget reduction is executed to delay the Project Preliminary Design Review until Ql of FY96.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report and revised FY95 plan, May 1995

Description: This report contains the project summary, as well as the financial summary for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Detailed accomplishments and milestone status are reported in the Task Summaries. The major accomplishments during this reporting period are included the following areas: preliminary design; systems integration; briefings for the Environmental Programs Scientific Advisory Committee; integrated cost/scheduling estimating system; feed preparation; mediated electrochemical oxidation; and molten salt oxidation.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer simulation of ductile fracture

Description: Finite difference computer simulation programs are capable of very accurate solutions to problems in plasticity with large deformations and rotation. This opens the possibility of developing models of ductile fracture by correlating experiments with equivalent computer simulations. Selected experiments were done to emphasize different aspects of the model. A difficult problem is the establishment of a fracture-size effect. This paper is a study of the strain field around notched tensile specimens of aluminum 6061-T651. A series of geometrically scaled specimens are tested to fracture. The scaled experiments are conducted for different notch radius-to-diameter ratios. The strains at fracture are determined from computer simulations. An estimate is made of the fracture-size effect.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Wilkins, M.L. & Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes

Description: The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D. & Couture, S.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mixed waste management facility: Cost-benefit for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Description: The Mixed Waste Management Facility, or MWMF, has been proposed as a national testbed facility for the demonstration and evaluation of technologies that are alternatives to incineration for the treatment of mixed low-level waste. The facility design will enable evaluation of technologies at pilot scale, including all aspects of the processes, from receiving and feed preparation to the preparation of final forms for disposal. The MWMF will reduce the risk of deploying such technologies by addressing the following: (1) Engineering development and scale-up. (2) Process integration and activation of the treatment systems. (3) Permitting and stakeholder issues. In light of the severe financial constraints imposed on the DOE and federal programs, DOE/HQ requested a study to assess the cost benefit for the MWMF given other potential alternatives to meet waste treatment needs. The MVVMF Project was asked to consider alternatives specifically associated with commercialization and privatization of the DOE site waste treatment operations and the acceptability (or lack of acceptability) of incineration as a waste treatment process. The result of this study will be one of the key elements for a DOE decision on proceeding with the MWMF into Final Design (KD-2) vs. proceeding with other options.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Brinker, S.D. & Streit, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mixed waste management facility. Project baseline revision 1.2

Description: Revision 1.2 to the Project Baseline (PB) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is in response to DOE directives and verbal guidance to (1) Collocate the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and MWMF into a single complex, integrate certain and overlapping functions as a cost-saving measure; (2) Meet certain fiscal year (FY) new-BA funding objectives ($15.3M in FY95) with lower and roughly balanced funding for out years; (3) Reduce Total Project Cost (TPC) for the MWMF Project; (4) Include costs for all appropriate permitting activities in the project TPC. This baseline revision also incorporates revisions in the technical baseline design for Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO). Changes in the WBS dictionary that are necessary as a result of this rebaseline, as well as minor title changes, at WBS Level 3 or above (DOE control level) are approved as a separate document. For completeness, the WBS dictionary that reflects these changes is contained in Appendix B. The PB, with revisions as described in this document, were also the basis for the FY97 Validation Process, presented to DOE and their reviewers on March 21-22, 1995. Appendix C lists information related to prior revisions to the PB. Several key changes relate to the integration of functions and sharing of facilities between the portion of the DWTF that will house the MWMF and those portions that are used by the Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) Division at LLNL. This collocation has been directed by DOE as a cost-saving measure and has been implemented in a manner that maintains separate operational elements from a safety and permitting viewpoint. Appendix D provides background information on the decision and implications of collocating the two facilities.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Streit, R.D. & Throop, A.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cumulative-strain-damage model of ductile fracture: simulation and prediction of engineering fracture tests

Description: A cumulative-strain-damage criterion is used to predict the initiation and propagation of fracture in ductile materials. The model is consistent with a model of ductile rupture that involves void growth and coalescence. Two- and three-dimensional finite difference computer codes, which use incremental-plasticity theory to describe large strains with rotation, are used to trace the history of damage in a material due to external forces. Fracture begins when the damage exceeds a critical value over a critical distance and proceeds as the critical-damage state is reached elsewhere. This unified approach to failure prediction can be applied to an arbitrary geometry if the material behavior has been adequately characterized. The damage function must be calibrated for a particular material using various material property tests. The fracture toughness of 6061-T651 aluminum is predicted.
Date: October 3, 1980
Creator: Wilkins, M.L.; Streit, R.D. & Reaugh, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of cracking in feedwater piping adjacent to the steam generators in Nine Pressurized Water Reactor Plants

Description: Cracking in ASTM A106-B and A106-C feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to the steam generators in a number of pressurized water reactor plants. We received sections with cracks from nine of the plants with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Variations were observed in piping surface irregularities, corrosion-product, pit, and crack morphology, surface elmental and crystal structure analyses, and steel microstructures and mechanical properties. However, with but two exceptions, namely, arrest bands and major surface irregularities, we were unable to relate the extent of cracking to any of these factors. Tensile and fracture toughness (J/sub Ic/ and tearing modulus) properties were measured over a range of temperatures and strain rates. No unusual properties or microstructures were observed that could be related to the cracking problem. All crack surfaces contained thick oxide deposits and showed evidence of cyclic events in the form of arrest bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fatigue striations on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces from one plant and possibly from three others. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a value of ..delta..sigma = 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses. Although surface irregularities and corrosion pits were sources for crack initiation and corrosion may have contributed to crack propagation, it is proposed that the overriding factor in the cracking problem is the presence of unforeseen cyclic loads.
Date: June 25, 1980
Creator: Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D. & Scott, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Load Combination Program. Progress report No. 5, April 1 - June 30, 1980. Volume 1

Description: This document is a progress report on the Load Combination Program (LCP) covering the period April 1, 1980 through June 30, 1980. The report gives a general description of the program by project and tasks, together with financial summaries, technical reports generated, and meeting attendance. Two appendixes which discuss technical subjects are also included. 13 figs.
Date: July 15, 1980
Creator: Chou, C.K.; Lu, S.C.; Schwartz, M.W.; Dutton, J.C.; George, L.L.; Gilman, F.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department